Trust News

[Weekend Reads] Preservation Stories from The New York Times, Thump, and More

Posted on: July 3rd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week.

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The Palisades are a National Treasure of the National Trust.

“’What preservation is really all about,’ the critic Ada Louise Huxtable noted almost 50 years ago, ‘is the retention and active relationship of buildings of the past to the community’s functioning present.’ Translation: Good preservation doesn’t embalm history. It binds a living past to change. ‘The accumulation,’ Mrs. Huxtable added, ‘is called culture.’ Replace buildings of the past with natural landmarks and you’ve got the LG story in Englewood Cliffs, N.J., which was resolved this week.” – The New York Times: LG Listens to Conservationists and Preserves a Landmark

“In July, the San Antonio Missions could become Texas’ first UNESCO World Heritage Site, but if it wasn’t for a small group of women in the 1920s, they may not have been standing today. More than 90 years since its founding, the San Antonio Conservation Society continues to work tirelessly to protect and preserve the city’s most valuable historic, natural and cultural assets.” – San Antonio Magazine: On A Mission... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Welcome to Weekend Reads at the PreservationNation blog, wherein we share a handful of the most interesting preservation-related stories we've come across over the course of the week. In light of the announcement of our new list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places on Wednesday, this week's articles are about the list.

The Factory, West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Hunter Kerhart)
The Factory, West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Hunter Kerhart)

"As Confederate flags come down across the country in the wake of the Charleston shooting, some say that American history is threatened. But a list of endangered historic places released by a respected D.C.-based nonprofit points out that American history transcends that of straight white men -- and often gets overlooked." Washington Post - Here are America’s most endangered historic places

"This year’s winners -- er, losers? -- are diverse: There’s The Factory, an LA nightclub that first rose to prominence as a center for gay culture as Studio One in the 1970s that’s being threatened by condo developers (condo developers are a recurring theme here). Or A.G. Gaston Motel, in Birmingham, Alabama, which served as a meeting place and planning hub for civil rights activists, including Martin Luther King Jr. What about Oak Flat, a National Forest in Arizona that’s now being mined for ore, creating a two-mile-wide crater?" Gizmodo - Go Now, These 11 Historic Places May Soon Be Gone Forever

"The National Trust for Historic Preservation expressed concerns over uranium mining around the Canyon, proposed development near the South Rim and a proposed resort on the Navajo Nation near the park's eastern border. The group added Oak Flat campground to the list over concerns about a proposed Resolution Copper mine." The Arizona Republic - Grand Canyon, Oak Flat added to endangered list

"But in 1974 a gay Beverly Hills eye doctor turned the building into Studio One, which became one of the most celebrated nightclubs in the country. Stars such as Patti LaBelle and Liza Minnelli performed there, and more than 1,000 people would dance under its disco balls and strobe lights. Aside from the legendary parties, Studio One hosted some of the country's first AIDS fundraisers, with entertainers like Joan Rivers helping pack the house." The Advocate - Infamous WeHo Dance Palace On National Trust's Endangered List

"Mayor William Bell is embracing the new listing from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, saying the attention will help advance the city's $10 million plan to restore the building and convert the property into a museum and public policy center. The facility will be known as the Freedom Center." AL.com - Saving history: Birmingham's A.G. Gaston Motel named among nation's 11 most endangered historic places

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Announcing America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places for 2015

Posted on: June 23rd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

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Grand Canyon, Arizona

Today, the National Trust for Historic Preservation issued our 28th annual list of the America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

This year’s list helps underscore the ongoing effort we have at the National Trust to tell the story of our nation in all its richness and complexity. We want to see the history of all Americans honored and remembered, and to see all our families and communities reflected in the telling. As such, many of the sites on the 2015 list, our most diverse ever, focus on important chapters in our history that have sometimes been overlooked.

We officially unveiled the 2015 list in a video released today:

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Join the Preservation50 Celebration!

Posted on: June 23rd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

By Eden Burgess, Preservation50

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2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), signed by President Lyndon Johnson on October 15, 1966. NHPA has transformed the face of communities from coast to coast, establishing the legal framework and incentives to preserve historic buildings, landscapes, and archaeology.

Preservation50 is the United States’ four-year effort to celebrate, learn from, and leverage the NHPA’s first five decades to assure historic preservation’s vibrant future in America. History lovers of all ages and backgrounds are gearing up for a slate of programs and initiatives aimed at revealing the great value that historic preservation delivers to the American people, and growing a community to lead preservation in the next 50 years.

The National Trust is a close partner in planning the celebration, and invites all its members to spread the word about how the NHPA has shaped the preservation of America’s historic and cultural heritage legacy in every corner of the nation.

2016 might feel like it’s far off, but it will be here before we know it. Get involved now by visiting www.preservation50.org and connecting with the celebration on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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Next City Vanguard conference attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a #ThisPlaceMatters-themed photo walk in Reno, hosted by the National Trust.

Successful tactical urbanism projects around the U.S. -- from parklets to pop-up shops -- show that sometimes all it takes to bring a community together is a simple, accessible project. That’s why this month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation is once again encouraging people in neighborhoods around the country to celebrate their connections to place through the organization’s “This Place Matters” campaign. (May is Preservation Month.)

“‘This Place Matters’ started in 2008 as a way for people to shine a spotlight on the historic places that played a role in their lives. Basically, it’s like crowdsourcing people’s personal connections to the built environment,” says Jason Clement, director of community outreach at the National Trust. “And the best part -- there are zero rules. These can be places that are large or small, nationally significant or personally priceless, historic or maybe just old. They just have to mean something to you.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

Happy Preservation Month, everyone! That’s right -- May is Preservation Month, our movement’s annual celebration of places and the people who save them. And to kick off this year’s festivities, we are thrilled to announce the reinvention of one of our favorite campaigns: This Place Matters.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.