Travel

 

In this round of our historic bars series, we travel to the American frontier of Alaska to a little spit of land to take a look at the Salty Dawg Saloon.

Credit: Cissy Rockett, Salty Dawg Saloon
The log cabin that houses the Salty Dawg was built in 1897. 

If you’ve never been to the Homer Spit, off Homer, Alaska, or heard of a drink called a Duck Fart, you might need to make tracks for the historic Salty Dawg Saloon. Housed in a 117-year-old cabin that has served the town in various capacities as a railroad station, grocery store, and post office, the Salty Dawg, which opened in 1957, is beloved by tourists and locals alike.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery in Portland, Oregon: A Refuge for All

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding

 

Credit: Metro and Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery
The MacLeay family mausoleum, in the southern section of Lone Fir.

Portland, Ore., might have been known as Boston, Ore., if not for the outcome of a simple coin toss in 1845. Founding father Asa Lovejoy had been pulling for Boston as the city’s name, but co-founder Francis Pettygrove, who was partial to the Portland moniker, outflipped him.

The penny they used is enshrined at the Oregon Historical Society, and Lovejoy himself rests in peace at Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery, in the city’s Buckman neighborhood. (Pettygrove, fittingly enough, is buried in another cemetery on the opposite side of the Willamette River.)

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

CityLove: Meet Philadelphia

Posted on: June 17th, 2014 by Grant Stevens 4 Comments

 

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Credit: mycombs, Instagram
Woodlands house #CityLovePHL #woodlandsphil --@mycombs, Michael Holmes. Our Monday evening meet-up was at the The Woodlands, a 54-acre beautiful oasis that includes a mansion, an 18th-century pleasure garden, and a 19th-century rural cemetery in West Philadelphia.

Since this past Saturday, National Trust staffers have been in Philadelphia as part of our on-the-ground series of CityLove events. We’ve taken people on behind-the-scenes tours throughout the city and done meet-ups in beautiful spaces. The result? We're falling head-over-heels for the City of Brotherly love. Here are just a few reasons why.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

[Historic Bars] Pinkie Master’s Lounge, Savannah’s Best Dive Bar

Posted on: June 13th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

As part of our historic bars series, we're continuing our coverage of the best dive bars in the country. This week, we turn our attention to the South and see what's going on in Savannah.

Credit: Erin KKR, Flickr
Pinkie Master’s is considered the best dive bar in Savannah, and one of the best in the entire South.

I’ll start with what I know to be true: Pinkie Master’s Lounge on Drayton Street in Savannah, Ga., was ranked as the third best dive bar in the South by Southern Living in 2013. It opened in 1951, and serves extremely cheap PBRs. It has alternately been referred to as “Stinky Bastards” and “The Vortex of Savannah.”

The rest is a little bit hazy.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

CityLove: Philadelphia by Instagram

Posted on: June 10th, 2014 by Grant Stevens

 

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Credit: digitaldave, Instagram
It’s Friday at Love Park … #Lomo-fi -- @digitaldave, David Ford

For our next installment of CityLove, we’re headed to The City of Brotherly Love: Philadelphia. In addition to our blog series, we’ll be doing in-person events June 14-20 in the city. If you’re in town, we hope you’ll join us!

Regardless, we wanted to spread the Philly warm-n-fuzzies to you virtually. For the past few weeks, we’ve been asking our followers to tag their photos with #CityLovePHL. Below we've chosen some of our favorites -- and we think they'll become your favorites, too.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.