Travel

Historic Train Stations (As Seen on Instagram)

Posted on: October 3rd, 2014 by Grant Stevens 19 Comments

 

Union Station. Credit: CocteauBoy
Detail of Union Station in Washington, D.C.

For a long time, I tried to deny it, but it’s probably time to fess up: I’m kind of a train nerd. Or at least I’m turning into one. I didn’t grow up around trains, but they have always fascinated me. I have vivid memories of visiting the Boone & Scenic Valley Railroad (pictured below) in elementary school and taking Amtrak from Iowa to New Mexico to get to Philmont Scout Ranch during high school.

In the last year, however, I think I’ve really realized my train nerd status. I’ve had the opportunity to travel through some beautiful train stations and several of our National Treasures projects have connections to trains. The Pullman Historic District in Chicago is home to the Pullman Palace Car; Washington, D.C.’s Union Station (where we did behind-the-scenes tours last May) is planning for a large expansion; and Cincinnati’s Union Terminal, an Art Deco masterpiece, needs public assistance to serve another generation of visitors.

I’m in Cincinnati right now, in fact, working on an exciting project for Union Terminal. (We’ll have a big announcement about that next week.) In the meantime, enjoy these photos of beautiful train stations from Instagram!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

[Historic Bars] The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming

Posted on: October 2nd, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Fans of the giggle water get to celebrate hooch in a big way this month as Preservation Nation covers blind pigs and juice joints – a.k.a. speakeasies -- as part of our historic bars series. First up: The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming.

The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.
The Mint Bar has been in operation since 1907.

Our collective memory of Prohibition, the roughly decade-long period in America's history when the manufacture, sale, and distribution (but not the consumption) of alcohol was forbidden, is rife with images of liberated flappers, hopping speakeasies, and decadent parties.

But Prohibition wasn’t all giggle water and dancing the Charleston; the American economy was damaged when thousands of jobs in alcohol-related industries were slashed, and a thousand people per year died, on average, from the years of 1920 to 1933 from drinking tainted bootleg liquor. The FDR-backed Prohibition repeal, ratified in 1933, was an exceedingly popular decision, bringing to a close what was known by temperance groups as “The Noble Experiment.”

While many bars across the nation were forced to close during the years of Prohibition, many more operated undercover as speakeasies, or places to partake in illegal hooch. The Mint Bar in Sheridan, Wyoming, was one such establishment.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] The Corner Club in Moscow, Idaho

Posted on: September 25th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 4 Comments

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. Last up for America’s historic sports bars: the Corner Club in Moscow, Idaho.

The Corner Club has been a Moscow, Idaho, institution since 1948.
The Corner Club has been a Moscow, Idaho, institution since 1948.

A man and his horse walk into a bar. The man orders two beers: one for him, one for his horse.

If you think I’m setting up a joke, you can stop waiting for the punch line. This is a true story from one day in the history of the Corner Club, a beloved 66-year-old sports bar in Moscow, Idaho.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

A Brief History of Palm Springs’ El Mirador Tower

Posted on: September 22nd, 2014 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

Since it opened in 1928, El Mirador Hotel and its iconic tower have been a Palm Springs landmark.
Since it opened in 1928, El Mirador Hotel and its iconic tower have been a Palm Springs landmark.

Think of Palm Springs, and you’re likely to envision a desert oasis dotted with sleek, Midcentury Modern buildings. But as you’ll read in the Fall 2014 issue of Preservation, the city has no shortage of buildings dating back to the earlier part of the last century.

These buildings from the 1920s and ‘30s tell the stories of Palm Springs' earliest days. But perhaps the structure with one of the more interesting, winding tales is the El Mirador Tower.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Retro Roadmap] Derby Racers, Carousels for Thrill-Seekers

Posted on: September 19th, 2014 by Beth Lennon

 

Graduating from the sedate carousel to the thrilling Derby Racer is a rite-of-passage across the decades at Rye Playland.
Graduating from the sedate carousel to the thrilling Derby Racer has been a rite-of-passage across the decades at Rye Playland.

The merry-go-round -- clinging to the brass pole with the horses gliding up and down to the tinkling sounds of the band organ -- is probably the one of the first amusement ride memories one has as a child. With their gentle appeal to riders of all ages, carousels remain a staple at any amusement park or carnival.

But there was a time at the beginning of the twentieth century when a “grown up” version of the carousel was available to the more adventurous. Sometimes thought of as inverted carousels since the poles and mechanisms were tucked underneath the quickly spinning track, they gave riders the opportunity to experience the rush of horse racing. Flying along at speeds twice as fast as the more sedate carousels, these hand-carved horses raced against each other to an imaginary finish line.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

[Historic Bars] The Holler House in Milwaukee

Posted on: September 18th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Preservation Nation continues its tour of historic bars as we slide (or stumble) our way into the musty dugouts that have served as the home bases for sports fans across the nation as they ride the bench and cheer their favorite teams. Next up for America’s historic sports bars: the Holler House in Milwaukee.

Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.
Milwaukee’s Holler House is home to the nation’s oldest certified bowling alley.

Speaking as a Midwestern native, I can tell you firsthand that the farther north you drive out of Chicago, the harder-pressed you’ll be to find a fancy watering hole. Wisconsin bars in particular pride themselves on their sticky floors and loud, bone-rattling jukeboxes; they’re spots to commiserate with friends and neighbors over pitchers of beer and baskets of greasy onion rings fried to perfection. Milwaukee’s Holler House, located in the city’s historically Polish South Side and owned by the Skowronski family since 1908, perfectly embodies the grittiness -- and greatness -- of this uniquely Midwestern variety of tavern.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.