Travel

 

Credit: Carlos Betancourt Inc.
Gloria Estefan presented a gift of $500,000 to the Friends of Miami Marine Stadium through her foundation on Saturday, June 28.

We're big fans of Gloria Estefan, the international superstar and trustee of the National Trust. In June 2013, we profiled her in the Spring issue of Preservation magazine, and she agreed to be the official “Voice of Miami Marine Stadium." Then, in January 2014, she and Jimmy Buffet were part of a one-of-a-kind celebration at the Coral Gables Museum.

This past Saturday, we found yet another reason to admire her: She announced a $500,000 gift through her foundation to our local partner, Friends of Miami Marine Stadium (FMMS).

Gloria’s announcement was part of the National Trust's “Day of Art and Action” at Miami Marine Stadium. In addition to announcing Gloria’s gift, the ART History Mural Project brought nine internationally recognized artists to the stadium to create large-scale murals. Curated by artist Logan Hicks, the murals will be photographed and sold as prints to benefit FMMS.

In addition, we held an Instagram contest where winners attended the day’s festivities, met Gloria and Hilario Candela (the stadium’s architect), and watched the street artists create their pieces. To help you get a feel for the day-long event and learn more about the artists, we pulled some photos from Instagram -- you can see more by searching the hashtag #marinestadium or checking out the @SavingPlaces account. Enjoy!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

Pharmacies-Turned-Restaurants: The Cure for What Ails You

Posted on: June 30th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: W.A. Frost & Co.
W.A. Frost & Company prides itself on serving seasonal, organic, locally sourced cuisine. 

If only you could get a doctor to write you a prescription for a meal in a refurbished pharmacy-turned-restaurant -- you'd feel better in no time. In the Summer 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight three such eateries: the Gryphon Tea Room in Savannah, Ga., housed in the city’s 1926 Scottish Rite Building; the Hillside Farmacy in Austin, Texas, named for the 1920s drugstore that occupied the same space; and Tonic at Quigley’s in Washington, D.C., located in the circa-1891 Quigley’s Pharmacy.

There are several more around the country, however, that could also do the trick -- consult our handy guide below.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

CityLovePHL: Our Week in Instagram Shots

Posted on: June 27th, 2014 by Grant Stevens

 

CityLove Header: Learn More!

brilliantartistry
Had an awesome time last Saturday exploring Eastern State Penitentiary. Now check it out through Sut’s iPhone. -- @brilliantartistry, Jarrett Hendrix

Last week’s CityLove celebration in Philadelphia included 20 events (exclusive behind-the-scenes tours, Instameets, special events, etc.) throughout the city over eight days. To date, more than 2,700 photos have been tagged with #CityLovePHL! Wow. Philly, you’ve truly stolen our heart.

We highlighted a few of our initial tour spots in last week’s CityLovePHL post, but this week we wanted to share some of our favorite photos. Though these snapshots certainly don't cover every stop we made, we hope you enjoy getting to see a bit more of our Philadelphia fun -- and are inspired to visit and explore these incredible sites yourself!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

 

Continuing our historic bars series, we take a look at the Slippery Noodle Inn, a well-known yet still genuine local bar in Indianapolis.

140626_blog_photo_SlipperyNoodle_Bar_SaraEtherington
The ceiling of the front bar is made of pressed tin and was installed around 1890. The "tiger oak" bar and the bar in the back are more than 100 years old as well.

"When a tourist comes to Indianapolis and asks where to grab a drink, they'll probably be told to go to the Slippery Noodle," says Sara Etherington, office manager of the historic Indiana watering hole.

With live music seven nights a week, a loyal constituent of thirsty locals, and the distinction of being the longest continuously operating bar in Indiana, "the Noodle" boasts a unique mix of having a well-known status and a consistent down-to-earth reputation.

"People like something local and unique," says Etherington. "It's one-of-a-kind."

Certainly the Noodle's famous breaded pork tenderloin, its half-priced Thursdays (a favorite among the locals, according to Etherington), and the every-night live music bring in the patrons, but the bar's appeal is rooted in something deeper than a savvy business model and a charming atmosphere: its history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

American World’s Fairs Icons that Have Stood the Test of Time

Posted on: June 20th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 6 Comments

 

Credit: Library of Congress, Wikimedia Commons
An aerial-view print of the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y.

The World’s Fair is one of the longest-running international exhibitions, in which countries gather to showcase premier inventions -- from Belgian waffles and ice cream to X-ray machines and electrical current systems. Ever since the first World’s Fair in 1851, which took place in London, host countries have constructed the most fantastic buildings, each outdoing the previous host.

During the Paris Universal Exposition in 1889, France erected the Eiffel Tower. In return, Chicago unveiled the never-before-seen Ferris wheel during the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which drew a crowd equal to a third of the U.S. population at the time. However, most World’s Fair buildings are constructed to be temporary, torn down after the one-time event.

Fortunately, not all World’s Fair buildings are demolished, and some even become the most iconic symbol of a city: Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, the New York State Pavilion, and certainly the Eiffel Tower. The upcoming World’s Fair will take place in Milan next year, but let’s take a look at some of the most iconic buildings that were built for the World’s Fair that have stood the test of time here in the United States.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.