Travel

 

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Chambers Bay is the first course in the Pacific Northwest to host the U.S. Open Championship.

Today, the best golfers from around the world will tee off in the 115th U.S. Open Championship at Chambers Bay Golf Course outside of Tacoma, Washington.

On top of making history as the first course in the Pacific Northwest to ever host the event, Chambers Bay has an interesting story of its own. The site was once home to an ancient Native American fishing village, a military fort, a sand and gravel mine, a conservation area, a waste water treatment facility, and now, of course, a championship-caliber golf course.

But of the many historic venues that have hosted the U.S. Open over the years, only four have transcended the game of golf and established themselves as icons of American history as National Historic Landmarks. Continue reading to find out which courses have made the cut.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Heritage Tourism

Posted on: June 17th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 


This video shares the highlights of the 2013 Zora Neale Hurston festival in historic Eatonville, Florida, an example of heritage tourism in action.

Heritage Tourism has been known to help economically revitalize struggling historic communities. But what exactly does it entail? The Georgia Department of Natural Resources: Historic Preservation Division Consultants Directory says:

Heritage Tourism, noun

The National Trust for Historic Preservation defines heritage tourism as traveling to experience the places, artifacts, and activities that authentically represent the stories and people of the past and present. It includes visitation to cultural, historic, and natural resources. Research and planning for Heritage Tourism would include identifying local or regional points of interest, developing or organizing those points of interest for visitation, and developing promotional and informational materials and guides for distribution to travelers and tourists through tourism bureaus, chambers of commerce, and by other marketing methods.

The video at the top of the post showcases the Zora Neale Hurston Festival, a successful endeavor by the historic town of Eatonville, Florida, to use their connection to author and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston to encourage heritage tourism and support their town.

Word in Use: "Heritage tourism brings in outside dollars providing employment across [Nevada]. Millions of dollars annually are spent at parks, museums, hotels, restaurants, stores and casinos by visitors to our historic and scenic sites…These are example of Nevada’s special places where heritage resources deserve our patronage and protection." -- Greg Seymour, "Legislature Protects Nevada Heritage"

Though an important component of heritage tourism is bringing in revenue for your historic neighborhood, another significant aspect is that it raises awareness for and celebrates the distinct culture of your community. For more information about heritage tourism, check out the National Trust’s five guiding principles for successful and sustainable heritage tourism development as well as four steps for getting started.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Summer Concert Series] Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 by David Weible

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): Johnny Cash, June Carter, Carl Perkins, the Tennessee Three, and the Statler Brothers

Venue: Folsom State Prison

Location: Represa, California

Date: January 13, 1968

Memorable Moment: The night before the show, Cash was presented with an original recording of an inmate who was serving life at Folsom. He liked the song, “Greystone Chapel,” so much, he recorded it as part of the show the next day.

Show Vibe: Roughly 1,000 inmates desperate for entertainment but surrounded by armed guards provided a unique atmosphere.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Ride Through History on These Historic Zoo Trains

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Fleishhacker Playfield Limited, or "Little Puffer," has been at the San Francisco Zoo since 1925.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we feature the Zooliner and the Centennial, two beloved miniature vintage trains at the Oregon Zoo that were restored and are now fully functional. In today’s post, we encourage you to hop aboard three additional historic trains and take a ride through history at the San Francisco Zoo, Detroit Zoo, and St. Louis Zoo.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Buy a Guitar at Tupelo Hardware: The Americana Music Triangle, Part 2

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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Memphis’ Beale Street is an 1.8 mile long stretch of blues clubs and restaurants in the city’s downtown.

A few weeks ago, we introduced you to the Americana Music Triangle, a 1,500 stretch of southern highway that encompasses the heart and soul of American music. We took virtual tours from New Orleans to Natchez and Vicksburg to Memphis, highlighting some of the museums, juke joints, and one-of-a-kind pit stops (like blues legend Robert Johnson's three gravesites) along the way.

Here, we’ve compiled recommendations from three more driving trails: Memphis to Nashville, Nashville to Muscle Shoals, and Tupelo back up to New Orleans (where the "Gold Record Road" began.) You’ll find gems like Jackson, Mississippi’s Historic Farish Street District, a hub for African-American businesses up until the end of Jim Crow, and the Rhythm Nightclub Memorial Museum, a Natchez spot memorializing a 1940 fire that killed visiting patrons and members of the Walter Barnes jazz band.

“The more I learn, the more I get excited about how much there is to learn about our music history,” says Americana Music Triangle founder Audrey Preston. “I kind of woke up one day and realized it’s really right on our back yard here – the roots of the music that is the popular music of the world.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] Gadsby’s Tavern in Old Town Alexandria

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Geoff Montes

 

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Gadsby's Tavern Restaurant in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, was built in 1792.

Most establishments can’t claim that their annual celebration of George Washington’s birthday originated with an appearance by the first president himself, but Gadsby’s Tavern Restaurant in Old Town Alexandria isn’t most establishments.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.