Travel

Follow the Gold Record Road: The Americana Music Triangle, Part 1

Posted on: May 29th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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This sculpture in Congo Square, New Orleans, pays homage to the enslaved workers who gathered there on Sundays to sell goods, dance, and play music.

The Americana Music Triangle is a stretch of land between Nashville, Memphis and New Orleans where a swirl of cultures and influences helped to form no fewer than nine uniquely American genres of music: blues, jazz, country, rock n’ roll, R&B/soul, gospel, southern gospel, Cajun/zydeco, and bluegrass. It includes the hot, swampy marshland that gave birth to the Delta Blues and the legendary recording studios of Nashville and Memphis that launched the careers of countless American icons like B.B King, Elvis and Johnny Cash. It’s a place that will tell you almost anything you want to know about the roots of American music, if you know where to look -- and listen.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

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The Bavarian Chef in Fredericksburg, Virginia offers travelers "warm, gemütlich hospitality."

In a previous post, we introduced you to three train depots-turned-restaurants which served up hot dishes that would make any Amtrak traveler envious. Today, we are giving you three more train depots-turned-restaurants that invite you to travel with them to taste-bud heaven.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Four Ghost Towns You Should Visit in the West

Posted on: May 7th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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Restored and recreated 19th-century structures await visitors at Calico, California.

We’ve had ghost towns on the brain lately. If our stories about Animas Forks, Colorado, or Bodie, California, haven’t convinced you to spend your summer vacation at a deserted mining town, maybe we can convince you with this round-up of ghost towns that are worth the trip.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Saving Places with a Twist: Preservation-Themed Booze, Part 2

Posted on: April 30th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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Great Lakes Brewery's Rotunda Pale Ale was inspired by the opening of Heinen's grocery store in the historic Ameritrust Rotunda in Cleveland.

One round of preservation-themed brews wasn't enough, so we’re offering you another one with special ties to preservation -- on the house! Sit back and soak up the nostalgia.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 


The Whitney Plantation uses art to honor slaves that toiled there and elsewhere across the United States. Video courtesy of The Whitney Plantation from UNISON LA on Vimeo.

When I visit a historic plantation or a city’s museum, I often see spaces -- such as slave cabins, outbuildings, or smaller exhibits -- that take on the task of interpreting slavery or free African-American communities. When I see this, I take a moment to appreciate the plantation or museum’s effort, and how far our nation has come in interpreting a narrative that, not too long ago, was invisible to the American public.

Though I appreciate these efforts, what intrigues and excites me is what the following five historic sites have done. They have flipped the traditional script and interpret their sites from the perspective of the enslaved or free African-American community. Moreover, they educate visitors about the struggles of African-Americans in both slavery and freedom and how this struggle influenced their culture.

Using different approaches, all of the five sites work to spark a dialogue that will lead to understanding and reconciliation. Take a look to see what I mean.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Atalaya Castle is a unique example of Moorish architecture infused with American craftsmanship.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, Logan Ward takes readers on a road trip down South Carolina' s Grand Strand, where Myrtle Beach is located. Along the way he visits the ruins of Atalaya in Murrells Inlet, an 80-year-old castle part of Huntington State Park with a vibrant history of art and culture.

Today, Atalaya hosts an annual arts festival in September, drawing fine artisans and aficionados from around the country. Here, we take a fresh look at the estate with more photos by Jody Horton from our feature story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.