Travel

Ride Through History on These Historic Zoo Trains

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Fleishhacker Playfield Limited, or "Little Puffer," has been at the San Francisco Zoo since 1925.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we feature the Zooliner and the Centennial, two beloved miniature vintage trains at the Oregon Zoo that were restored and are now fully functional. In today’s post, we encourage you to hop aboard three additional historic trains and take a ride through history at the San Francisco Zoo, Detroit Zoo, and St. Louis Zoo.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Buy a Guitar at Tupelo Hardware: The Americana Music Triangle, Part 2

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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Memphis’ Beale Street is an 1.8 mile long stretch of blues clubs and restaurants in the city’s downtown.

A few weeks ago, we introduced you to the Americana Music Triangle, a 1,500 stretch of southern highway that encompasses the heart and soul of American music. We took virtual tours from New Orleans to Natchez and Vicksburg to Memphis, highlighting some of the museums, juke joints, and one-of-a-kind pit stops (like blues legend Robert Johnson's three gravesites) along the way.

Here, we’ve compiled recommendations from three more driving trails: Memphis to Nashville, Nashville to Muscle Shoals, and Tupelo back up to New Orleans (where the "Gold Record Road" began.) You’ll find gems like Jackson, Mississippi’s Historic Farish Street District, a hub for African-American businesses up until the end of Jim Crow, and the Rhythm Nightclub Memorial Museum, a Natchez spot memorializing a 1940 fire that killed visiting patrons and members of the Walter Barnes jazz band.

“The more I learn, the more I get excited about how much there is to learn about our music history,” says Americana Music Triangle founder Audrey Preston. “I kind of woke up one day and realized it’s really right on our back yard here – the roots of the music that is the popular music of the world.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] Gadsby’s Tavern in Old Town Alexandria

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Geoff Montes

 

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Gadsby's Tavern Restaurant in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia, was built in 1792.

Most establishments can’t claim that their annual celebration of George Washington’s birthday originated with an appearance by the first president himself, but Gadsby’s Tavern Restaurant in Old Town Alexandria isn’t most establishments.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

[Photos] Roadside Rest Shelters

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

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This rest area stands against the desert backdrop near Abiquiu, New Mexico.

Think back to your last road trip. Where did you stop for a bite to eat? What scenery did you study when you paused to stretch your legs?

Before options like drive-thrus and commercial travel centers made road travel a little more convenient, small roadside rest areas, many of which were built as part of the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, were a driver’s only option.

On a drive from Los Angeles to Austin, Texas, in 2007, photographer Ryann Ford took notice of these rest shelters. “As a photographer, it’s hard not to notice them,” she says. “They’re perfect minimalist structures set on a perfect landscape. And they’re each different in their own way.”

For the last six years, Ford has traveled the country documenting rest shelters along highways and in state and national parks.

“I think they tell the story of a different time,” she says. “Now, we’re so rushed with our travel. We just want to get from point A to point B really quickly, whether it’s by plane or jumping on the fastest highway and getting there as fast as possible. If you eat, it’s through a drive-thru. [These rest shelters] tell the story of a different era in travel, when it was about the journey.”

You can explore Ford’s full collection of photographs in her book, The Last Stop: Vanishing Relics of the American Roadside, due out from powerHouse Books next spring. Until then, you can see a sampling of her photos in the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation.

We’ve also shared a few more of her images here. And we’d love to hear from you. Share your memories of roadside rest areas below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Dive Into These Six Historic Swimming Pools

Posted on: June 8th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding 8 Comments

 

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The Roman Pool at Hearst Castle

We’ve had historic swimming pools on the brain lately. The Summer 2015 issue of Preservation magazine features a story on the architect Julia Morgan, who was known in part for designing unusually lovely pools. (Plus, it’s another hot summer here in Washington, D.C., so the thought of a refreshing dip helps make our workday go swimmingly.)

Below, we’ve assembled a photo tour of six standout pools, three of them designed by Morgan. If you have other favorite historic pools, please let us know about them in the comments section.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Dunedin, Florida: Historic Coastal Getaway with a Scottish Twist

Posted on: June 8th, 2015 by Geoff Montes

 

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The 1922 view of gated Edgewater Drive, lined with new palm trees.

Florida’s Gulf Coast might seem like a dubious place to discover Celtic history, but sandwiched between Clearwater and Palm Harbor is a city that boasts a proud Scottish heritage -- and an admirable preservation ethic.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.