Travel

[Summer Concert Series] Talking Heads at the Pantages Theatre

Posted on: July 16th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performers: David Byrne, Chris Frantz, Jerry Harrison, Tina Weymouth, Ednah Holt, Lynn Mabry, Steven Scales, Alex Weir, Bernie Worrell

Venue: Pantages Theatre

Location: Hollywood, California

Date: December 1983

Memorable moment: The concert film Stop Making Sense was filmed over the course of a four-night stand by the Talking Heads at the Pantages Theatre. Director Jonathan Demme wanted to shoot additional scenes on a soundstage made to recreate the Pantages, but the band thought the lack of audience response would hinder their performance’s energy.

Show vibe: Stop Making Sense was shot during the Talking Heads’ tour in support of their fifth studio album, Speaking In Tongues, when the band was arguably reaching the peak of their fame. Audience members are featured briefly in only a few of the movie's shots, but to this day, filmgoers dance in the aisles at public screenings.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

The True Story Behind Those Giant Concrete Arrows

Posted on: July 16th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 7 Comments

 

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Giant concrete arrows were first installed by the Department of Commerce around 1927 to guide commercial pilots. (Photo courtesy Dppowell, Wikimedia Commons)

In the days before high-tech navigation systems, pilots flying across the country had slightly simpler tools to point them in the right direction: a network of beacons and giant concrete arrows.

Some of those arrows still exist today -- huge, mysterious, brush-covered artifacts, generally in remote reaches of the country. To an unsuspecting hiker, it might be a startling discovery. But together, these beacons and arrows tell the story of how the country’s earliest airmail and commercial airline pilots navigated the skies.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Historic Bars] Mr. Henry’s in Washington, D.C.

Posted on: July 9th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 4 Comments

 

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Mr. Henry’s has inhabited the same building on Capitol Hill since 1966.

As any District resident will tell you, Capitol Hill isn’t all C-SPAN and suits. Once you venture beyond the iconic dome and staid office buildings into the surrounding neighborhood populated by restaurants, shops and row houses, you’ll find plenty of eclectic charm, not to mention a historic bar or two.

Mr. Henry’s is one of the oldest and most beloved of these establishments. Operating continuously in the same location since 1966, the watering hole is well-known for its rich jazz history, as well as its friendly atmosphere and weekend brunch buffet (which, sadly, was discontinued earlier this year under new management.) The walls of the first floor are lined with Victorian-inspired paintings and art that have remained largely untouched over the years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Travel Itinerary] Elkmont Historic District, Tennessee

Posted on: July 6th, 2015 by Nancy Tinker 3 Comments

 

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Daisy Town sits at the heart of the historic Elkmont community and includes the Appalachian Clubhouse.

Nestled in the lush Little River Valley of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the Elkmont Historic District. The site has played multiple roles over many years. It was home to East Tennessee’s earliest settlers, a 19th-century logging camp and railroad line, and the Smokies’ most popular public campground. Elkmont is also the park’s most controversial historic district.

The story begins in 1908 when the Little River Lumber Company established the town of Elkmont as a base for logging operations and site of a railroad devoted to timber removal. Within two years, 86,000 acres of the Smokies had been cut, and the lumber company began deeding land to Knoxville businessmen who constructed cabins as weekend retreats and summer homes.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Nancy Tinker

Nancy Tinker

Nancy Tinker is a Senior Field Officer in the Charleston Field Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

[Travel Itinerary] Lowell, Massachusetts

Posted on: July 2nd, 2015 by David Weible

 

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Trolley tours through Lowell National Historical Park are free of charge.

One of Lowell, Massachusetts’ defining qualities -- beyond being a hard-working, blue-collar town -- is change.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] Flat Tire Lounge in Madrid, Iowa

Posted on: July 2nd, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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Flat Tire Lounge is in an old Quonset hut originally used by the railroad. It now features a new 800-square-foot deck.

A pint of beer after a summer afternoon bike ride? Yes, please.

Flat Tire Lounge in Madrid, Iowa, can deliver just that. This bike-friendly bar opened in 2011 as the vision of a group of local friends.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.