Travel

Find Nautical Nourishment at These Boathouses-Turned-Restaurants

Posted on: June 29th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Loeb Boathouse in Central Park

In the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation magazine we show you where you can drop anchor and get succulent maritime meals at three historic boathouses-turned-restaurants. Today, we take you somewhere beyond the sea to three more historic boathouses that now serve top notch cuisine.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 


Marquette University, a Jesuit college named for Father Marquette, was established in 1881.

In our summer 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight the historic charm of Marquette, Michigan, the biggest city in the state’s Upper Peninsula and one of the most architecturally significant. This place, however, isn’t the only one in the region to bear that moniker -- far from it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] Calaboose Grille in Owego, New York

Posted on: June 25th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 


The Calaboose Grille is located in the former Tioga County jail in Owego, New York.

You walk into a small cell. You hear the rough roll and clink of the cell door as it slams shut behind you. Is this the end of the line? Is it a surreal “Locked Up Abroad” (or in Owego’s case, “Locked Up in a Small Town”) experience?

No. You’re just having a good drink and a good time at the Calaboose Grille.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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The Supper Club in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, offers a fresh farm to table dining experience for its guests.

We hope that our last post left your mouth watering for the delicious dishes at former train depots that now host unique restaurants. Today, we bring you another round of train depots-turned restaurants that are sure to leave you with gastronomical comfort and railroad nostalgia.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Celebrate 50 Years of Preservation In Denver’s Larimer Square

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.
Larimer Square was the site of Denver’s very first building, constructed in 1858.

Not every major city can point to the exact spot where it began, but Denver can.

That spot is Larimer Square, where settler and developer William Larimer and his son first built a 16-by-20-foot log cabin in 1858. After aggressively selling tracts of land to miners and other migrants to the Rocky Mountains, Larimer eventually saw the city of Denver incorporate in 1860.

Although the original cabin was torn down in 1861, the square still stands today as a testament to its namesake’s tenacity and pioneer spirit. There was a time in the 1960s, however, when the future of Larimer Square was threatened by Denver's Urban Renewal Authority, which was attempting to "modernize" the city's skyline. In 1963, preservationist and developer Dana Crawford stepped in to form the Larimer Square Association, eventually succeeding in saving the block-long row of buildings from demolition in 1965 and ensuring their survival into the 21st century.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

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Chambers Bay is the first course in the Pacific Northwest to host the U.S. Open Championship.

Today, the best golfers from around the world will tee off in the 115th U.S. Open Championship at Chambers Bay Golf Course outside of Tacoma, Washington.

On top of making history as the first course in the Pacific Northwest to ever host the event, Chambers Bay has an interesting story of its own. The site was once home to an ancient Native American fishing village, a military fort, a sand and gravel mine, a conservation area, a waste water treatment facility, and now, of course, a championship-caliber golf course.

But of the many historic venues that have hosted the U.S. Open over the years, only four have transcended the game of golf and established themselves as icons of American history as National Historic Landmarks. Continue reading to find out which courses have made the cut.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.