Travel

 

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During Prohibition, a grocery store on the upper level was a front for a basement-level speakeasy, called Menotti’s Buffet. Today, you can order cocktails upstairs at Townhouse or in the basement at Del Monte Speakeasy.

As you might imagine, it wasn’t easy to get into Menotti’s Buffet during Prohibition -- and I mean that in many senses of the word. First, you had to know that the speakeasy even existed there in the basement of a Venice, California, grocery store. Plus, you also had to know the bartender. And then there was the part about actually getting down to where the alcohol was served. That required going through a trapdoor and into a tiny two-person, rope-operated dumbwaiter.

But in its 100 years, this bar -- the oldest bar in Venice, and one of the oldest in the greater Los Angeles area -- has always kept the party going.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Plunge Into the Past With These Five Historic Swimming Pools

Posted on: July 20th, 2015 by Kara Timberlake 4 Comments

 

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Coral Gables' Venetian Pool is a cornerstone of the community.

In the wake of our previous historic swimming pools post, we’ve arranged a tour of five more historic pools to help you escape the sweltering summer heat. Dip your toes into these refreshingly cool swimming spots from around the country.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. An aficionado of coffee and music, she loves to discover hidden stories through reading, traveling, and meeting new people.

[Travel Itinerary] Rugby, Tennessee

Posted on: July 20th, 2015 by Nancy Tinker 3 Comments

 

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The Thomas Hughes Free Public Library, named after Rugby, Tennessee's founder, contains 7,000 volumes and 1,000 periodicals.

The village of historic Rugby is nestled in Tennessee’s Cumberland Plateau, tucked within the craggy bands of mountains that define much of northeast Tennessee’s rugged landscape. The Rugby community was founded by English social reformer Thomas Hughes, a liberal member of English Parliament and author of the hugely popular novel, Tom Brown’s School Days.

Concerned about the social and economic inequity faced by England’s “second sons” and the American working class, Hughes sought to establish a cultured community free of the social constraints endemic to 19th-century society. Believing there was little desire for social reform in England, Hughes set his sights on America where he believed agricultural opportunity would give energetic and talented young men a fresh start.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Nancy Tinker

Nancy Tinker

Nancy Tinker is a Senior Field Officer in the Charleston Field Office of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

This Eid al-Fitr, Explore Five Historic Mosques Nationwide

Posted on: July 17th, 2015 by Kara Timberlake No Comments

 

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The Islamic Center of Washington in Washington, D.C.

Today marks a joyous celebration for Muslims worldwide. The Islamic holy month of Ramadan concludes and followers celebrate Eid al-Fitr, a holiday that translates as “festival of breaking of the fast” and boasts feasts that, in some communities, can last up to three days.

In honor of this religious holiday, we pay homage to five historic mosques from around the country.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake

Kara Timberlake is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. An aficionado of coffee and music, she loves to discover hidden stories through reading, traveling, and meeting new people.

The True Story Behind Those Giant Concrete Arrows

Posted on: July 16th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 7 Comments

 

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Giant concrete arrows were first installed by the Department of Commerce around 1927 to guide commercial pilots. (Photo courtesy Dppowell, Wikimedia Commons)

In the days before high-tech navigation systems, pilots flying across the country had slightly simpler tools to point them in the right direction: a network of beacons and giant concrete arrows.

Some of those arrows still exist today -- huge, mysterious, brush-covered artifacts, generally in remote reaches of the country. To an unsuspecting hiker, it might be a startling discovery. But together, these beacons and arrows tell the story of how the country’s earliest airmail and commercial airline pilots navigated the skies.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Historic Bars] Mr. Henry’s in Washington, D.C.

Posted on: July 9th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 4 Comments

 

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Mr. Henry’s has inhabited the same building on Capitol Hill since 1966.

As any District resident will tell you, Capitol Hill isn’t all C-SPAN and suits. Once you venture beyond the iconic dome and staid office buildings into the surrounding neighborhood populated by restaurants, shops and row houses, you’ll find plenty of eclectic charm, not to mention a historic bar or two.

Mr. Henry’s is one of the oldest and most beloved of these establishments. Operating continuously in the same location since 1966, the watering hole is well-known for its rich jazz history, as well as its friendly atmosphere and weekend brunch buffet (which, sadly, was discontinued earlier this year under new management.) The walls of the first floor are lined with Victorian-inspired paintings and art that have remained largely untouched over the years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.