Travel

 

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Sometimes, the experiences that move us most are also the ones that go beyond words -- and that's where composer Eric Nathan finds his richest inspiration. Take, for example, his time spent in the Eternal City as a 2013 Rome Prize Fellow, where Nathan met our National Trust colleague Tom Mayes (a fellow Fellow) and became intrigued by Mayes' exploration of why old places matter.

The result of their conversations? Nathan's composition "Why Old Places Matter," a 12-minute piece for oboe, horn, and piano that was commissioned by the Boston Symphony Orchestra for the Boston Symphony Orchestra Chamber Players. In this piece, he evokes place, continuity, and memory -- all without words.

We caught up with Nathan to learn more about his creative process, his time in Rome, and his own relationship to old places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Historic Bars] San Francisco’s Vesuvio Cafe

Posted on: February 26th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: Vesuvio Café in San Francisco.

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Vesuvio Café was founded in 1948.

Writer Henry Miller once wrote to Jack Kerouac, saying that he enjoyed The Dharma Bums and would like to meet the younger author in person. Kerouac agreed, and they arranged to meet one night in 1960 in Big Sur, along California’s central coast.

But the night of the meeting, Kerouac never made it out of San Francisco. Instead, he spent his evening at Vesuvio Café.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

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In this day of green screens, CGI, and other special effects techniques, it’s easy for filmmakers to fake reality. But when it comes to historic places, many of this year’s Oscar contenders opted for the real deal.

Below, we look at five Academy Award-nominated films that shot on-location at historic sites across the country.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Historic Bars] Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge

Posted on: February 18th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge in Nashville.

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Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge has been a hub for many Country Music legends such as Faron Young, Patsy Cline, Kris Kristofferson, and Loretta Lynn.

Picture this: It's Nashville, the bar is packed, the ‘shine is flowing, and the music is rocking.

Where are you? None other than Tootsies World Famous Orchid Lounge!

Tootsies is the most famous honky tonk on downtown Nashville’s Broadway. It has hosted and nurtured dozens of Country Music’s legends -- such as Faron Young, Charley Pride, Patsy Cline, and Loretta Lynn, to name a few -- and is responsible for grooming many of Music City’s stars of tomorrow. With such a reputation, Tootsies has become a legend in and of itself.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Historic Bars] Chicago’s Billy Goat Tavern

Posted on: February 12th, 2015 by David Weible

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: the Billy Goat Tavern in Chicago.

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The original Billy Goat Tavern moved to its current subterranean location just north of the Chicago River in 1964.

As if beer and cheeseburgers weren’t enough, Chicago’s Billy Goat Tavern also boasts barnyard animals, baseball curses, an SNL skit, and -- best of all -- a wall of fame for writers.

OK, there’s a chance I have my priorities a little mixed up, but no matter what order you put the above in, this joint’s a winner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] Cheers in Boston

Posted on: February 5th, 2015 by Geoff Montes

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. First up: the needs-no-introduction Cheers in Boston, Massachusetts.

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The Boston bar that inspired the TV series “Cheers” was originally named the Bull and Finch Pub, and was actually established in 1969.

The Boston pub that inspired the fictional bar in the CBS sitcom “Cheers” is actually a real neighborhood institution that has been serving its Beacon Hill environs for 46 years.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.