Travel

Four More California Wineries With Rich Histories

Posted on: April 20th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

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Wine being barrel-aged at the Gundlach Bundschu winery.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, we feature the stories of three well-aged and much-loved Northern California wineries that have weathered historical calamities to continue producing award-winning libations into the present day. There are so many others whose stories we didn’t get the chance to tell, so we thought we’d take this opportunity to do so.

Gundlach Bundschu, Freemark Abbey, Inglenook and Beringer Vineyards are all known for their rich viticultural history. Sit back, pour a glass of your favorite vintage, and read on to find out more about how each vineyard got its start and endured setbacks such as Prohibition and the 2014 Napa Valley Earthquake.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Written by Sarah Fitts, Atlanta Movie Tours

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The Castleberry Hill neighborhood has been featured in films such as "Driving Miss Daisy," "Sweet Home Alabama," and "Ride Along."

Recently, Atlanta, Georgia, has become known as "The Hollywood of the South." Right now, over 35 television shows and movies are filming in and around the city. And although Atlanta’s movie business is just beginning to boom, there are several places in the city and in surrounding areas that have been saved from -- or face the threat of -- demolition.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Saving Places with a Twist: Preservation-Themed Booze

Posted on: April 8th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 4 Comments

 

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The Ladies United for the Preservation of Endangered Cocktails (LUPEC) meet once a month to socialize, network, and have a good cocktail.

If you’ve been following the hype around The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament, you can understand how preservation and alcohol can combine to make an intoxicating mix. As the Big Tap rounds up this week (have you voted for the champion yet?), we’d like to highlight some fascinating groups with preservation ties to one of our favorite vices.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Bells, Banjos, and Bullets at the Appomattox Sesquicentennial

Posted on: April 6th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Generals Grant and Lee signed surrender documents in the parlor of Wilmer McLean’s brick house (reconstructed by the Park Service in the 1940s). (credit: Jim Bowen)
Generals Grant and Lee signed surrender documents in the parlor of Wilmer McLean’s brick house (reconstructed by the Park Service in the 1940s).

On the afternoon of April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert E. Lee, decked out in full dress attire, signed surrender documents in the parlor of the modest brick house of Wilmer McLean in Appomattox Court House, Virginia. They were accepted by a muddy and threadbare Ulysses S. Grant, and the Civil War was effectively over, after four bloody years.

Fast-forward to today, and the village of Appomattox Court House, including the brick home where the historic meeting between Lee and Grant took place, has become a National Historical Park, meticulously preserved by the National Park Service to bring visitors closer to this pivotal moment in our nation’s history. Starting on April 8, that history will come alive during a sesquicentennial celebration and commemoration.

NPS and the village have been preparing for this event for two years, and they’re expecting 1,100 re-enactors, as well as thousands of visitors, during the five-day event. (The Appomattox County Historical Society, which is holding a separate reenactment outside the park, is expecting about 3,600 re-enactors.) Music, reenactments and historian talks are all on the agenda, and none of the on-site events require advance reservations or tickets.

We've rounded up a few highlights below, but you can find the full list (and a map of the festivities) here. Also, don’t forget to use the hashtag #APX150th on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for all of your Appomattox-related posts.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Historic Real Estate: Historic Inns and Hotels Edition

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Mountain View Inn is within the vicinity of Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, presented by the Yale School of Music.

Mountain View Inn -- Norfolk, Connecticut

Mountain View Inn is a charming country hideaway that offers the perfect retreat for guests, and a promising commercial venture for any potential entrepreneur. Located in Litchfield Hills region of the Berkshires, this Victorian mansion, built in 1880, offers nine bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a Grand Hall, and a formal living and dining room, all perfect for hosting wedding parties, business and conference guests, and tourists to the quaint town of Norfolk. When business is booming and extra space is needed, there is a guesthouse behind the Inn with two bedrooms, one bathroom, a kitchen, and living room. The Mountain View Inn always has potential for business due to its vicinity to Norfolk’s Infinity Hall and Bistro and the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival’s concerts, recitals, and classes. Price: $895,000

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One luminary that visited the Wheat Growers Hotel was Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Wheat Growers Hotel -- Kimball, Nebraska

Built in 1918 by Frank Cunningham, one of the most successful wheat growers in Nebraska at the time, the Wheat Growers Hotel was considered the best hotel between Omaha and Denver during the 1920s, ‘30s, and ‘40s. Its 86 rooms had hot and cold running water and electricity, a novelty for the times. The stylish basement ballroom and restaurant were the venue for some of Kimball’s most elegant parties during the post-World War I era.

The Wheat Growers Hotel was built adjacent to a train depot and, as a result, was a melting pot for people from all regions and walks of life. (One luminary to visit was Dwight D. Eisenhower.) However, as automobile travel became more popular, passenger railway travel declined and the Wheat Growers Hotel’s business dwindled. In 1988 the hotel permanently closed its doors, but now it is looking for a business- and preservation-savvy owner to restore it to its former elegance and glory. Price: $51,000

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The Graystone Inn has been recognized by American Historic Inns, Inc. as one of the "Top 10 Most Romantic Inns in the U.S."

Graystone Inn -- Wilmington, North Carolina

Built in 1905 and located in North Carolina’s largest historic district, the Graystone Inn boasts not only Southern charm, but also modern elegance. Already recognized by American Historic Inns, Inc. as one of the “Top 10 Most Romantic Inns in the U.S.,” and as a Four Diamond hotel by AAA, the Graystone has a reputation that any potential proprietor can be proud of -- and profit from. With nine guest suites and a large first floor that holds 100 or more guests, the Inn is the perfect venue for any special event. The Graystone also has a two-bedroom owner’s quarters and a one-bedroom apartment suitable for use as a long term rental space or as an office. Price: $2,850,000

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

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Post-earthquake, the first floor of the 1886 winery building leans about four feet to the west.

At 3:20 a.m. on August 24, 2014, the ground in Napa, California started shaking, heralding a 6.0 magnitude earthquake. It was the region's largest seismic activity since 1989's Loma Prieta quake, and although it only lasted about 10 to 20 seconds, varying by location, that was more than enough time for the temblor to tear buildings apart, spark fires, and send hundreds to area hospitals with injuries. It also caused millions of dollars worth of damage to homes, businesses and infrastructure, and especially the region's famous wineries.

One of the hardest hit wineries was Trefethen Family Vineyards, an operation known throughout the valley for its unique wooden production building dating from 1886. I spoke with Hailey Trefethen, a third-generation vintner who works with her family’s winemaking and viticulture operations, about the damage sustained to Trefethen’s iconic National Register-listed building and the rehabilitation efforts than are underway.

Now propped up on steel buttresses, the building is estimated to take about one to two years to restore, and the total cost of the overhaul is not yet known. The Trefethen family, however, hasn’t let the damage to its beloved building crush its spirits.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.