Travel

[Interview] Zach Schonfeld: "I Visit Presidential Birthplaces"

Posted on: July 31st, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita 3 Comments

 

Zach Schonfeld's project: he visits presidential birthplaces. Credit: Rachel Pincus.
“I wanted to pursue something absurd before succumbing to adulthood,” says Zach Schonfeld of his project on historical tourism and presidential history.

While in college, Zach Schonfeld had a quarter-life crisis. So, the 22-year-old decided to roadtrip across the country and see where U.S. presidents were born.

In the summer of 2011, he set off to blog about the local stories behind the national myths, from Jimmy Carter to Andrew Jackson to Ronald Reagan. The result: I Visit Presidential Birthplaces, a project funded by The History Channel and Wesleyan University, where Schonfeld studied English.

This past spring Schonfeld finished the project as his undergraduate thesis. Now, he’s here to share with us some of his presidential adventures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Silver Birches: Polishing a Jewel at Michigan's Mackinac Island

Posted on: July 29th, 2013 by Paulina Tam

 

Silver Birches ready for the 2013 July 4th festivities. Credit: Silver Birches.
Silver Birches ready for the 2013 July 4th festivities.

"They say Mackinac Island is the crown jewel of Michigan," says Liz Ware, a Chicago native who is spearheading the renovation of Silver Birches, one of the many historic buildings at the popular Mackinac Island summer colony at Lake Huron, Michigan.

Built in 1906, Silver Birches alternated between use as a private rental property and a public resort, lodge, and girls' camp. Its pristine Adirondack style signified health and wellness, drawing generations of visitors to its dock, pool, and cottages.

"I saw the property last summer for the first time when I was on a boat going around the island," says Ware. "I saw it from the water and I thought, 'What is that place?' Afterwards, I got on my bicycle and rode out to the property. I walked to the back of it and I saw its architectural style and the view of the lake. Then I just cried because it was just so beautiful."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

 


Wigwam Village #2 in Cave City, Kentucky was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. Seven of these roadside motels once stood in Kentucky, Alabama, Arizona, Louisiana, Florida, and California.

In the old days before the interstate, you would take the Dixie Highway, one of the first north-south, cross-country roads in the U.S. Driving with the windows down in a vintage car, you'd see these curious structures emerge on the roadside, beckoning in a retro sign: "Sleep in a Wigwam!"

No, they’re not actually wigwams; in fact, they're formed like tipis. And yes, it may have been one man’s misguided cultural appropriation. But "Wigwam Villages" are an iconic -- if controversial -- piece of American road-travel culture and history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

[Sitings] African Meeting House, Nantucket

Posted on: July 13th, 2013 by Mame McCully 1 Comment

 

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The African Meeting House on York Street in Nantucket, Mass.

Nantucket, Mass., a popular and picturesque summer destination, is home to the African Meeting House and the Seneca Boston-Florence Higginbotham House. Sites of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, these historic structures tell the story of the 19th-century African-American community on the island.

Spend a few minutes virtually touring this special site:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

Twitter Chat Recap: Travel, Bucket Lists, and Announcements

Posted on: June 26th, 2013 by Sarah Heffern

 

Historic marker for Hasbrouck House in New Paltz, NY. Photo courtesy Robert A, Flickr.
Historic marker for Hasbrouck House in New Paltz, NY.

Going into the summer months, there's no better topic to cover than travel, since most everyone is thinking about hitting the road at some point. For that reason, historic travel was the topic of our June #builtheritage Twitter chat.

We had a great conversation about our bucket lists, serendipitous preservation discoveries, festivals and reenactments, and our favorite ways of saving and sharing all our travel memories. (Surprise discovery: I'm not the only preservationist who loves using Foursquare to find places to go when I'm on vacation.)

A slideshow of highlights is below, and there's a more complete transcript is available as well.

Ordinarily, this is where I would announce our next topic, but in keeping with today's vacation theme, today's news is that we'll be taking the month of July off from the #builtheritage chat. With our regularly scheduled date/time being on the eve of the Fourth of July -- and, therefore, a long weekend for many of our U.S. participants -- we thought folks might be embarking on a little historic travel of their own, rather than sitting at their computers.

We'll be back in August at our usual time, 4:00 p.m. EDT on the first Wednesday of the month -- August 7. See you then!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.