Travel

Preservation in Play: Five Old Playgrounds Worth Visiting

Posted on: August 4th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Giant Stride ca. 1910-1915 as would be seen on a Model Playground. Credit: Library of Congress.
This piece of playground equipment is called a Giant Stride, ca. 1910-1915.

By this point in the summer, with humidity building and activities dwindling, kids on break from school are likely to turn to the most classic of childhood activities: a visit to the playground.

Though you might not think of them this way, these ubiquitous community spaces have a fascinating background all their own, as Kaitlin O'Shea (of Preservation in Pink fame) shared with us in her post, The History of Playgrounds. So, in honor of the dog days of summer -- and all the industrious kids bringing their imaginations outside -- we're sharing five older or historic playgrounds around the country that might inspire you to do the same.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Have A Whale Of A Time In New Bedford, Massachusetts

Posted on: August 3rd, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

150803_blog-photo_new-bedford
The New Bedford Whaling Museum (right) tells the global story of whales and whaling, and is open daily.

What do novelist Herman Melville, abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and two members of the ‘90’s hip-hop group Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch have in common?

We won’t leave you hanging: All of the above have ties to New Bedford, Massachusetts, either living or working in the city at some point in their lives. (Melville and Douglass came to New Bedford later in life, while the two Funky Bunch members, Hector Barros and Scott Ross, are New Bedford natives.) The city of about 95,000, located right on the state’s Buzzards Bay, is rife with whaling history, as well as abolitionist and African-American heritage.

Check out our list of highlights of some of the amazing cultural and historical experiences that New Bedford has to offer, including nine historic districts and the oldest continuously operating jail in the United States. (Plus, it's home to the First Baptist Church, one of our National Treasures.) You’re guaranteed to leave with good vibrations.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

140925_blog-photo_corner-club_sign

Our Historic Bars series is in a fresh round of old and historic watering holes around the country, but we here at PreservationNation found ourselves getting a bit nostalgic for the favorite bars of yesteryear. Indulge us for a moment, and come along for a stroll (or stagger) down Memory Lane as we revisit the five most popular bar features from the past year.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

150730_blog-photo_Wichahpi1
Tom Hendrix has spent the last 30 years building this mile-long monument to his great-great grandmother.

Some retirees take up fly-fishing or gardening. After retiring from a Ford Motor Company aluminum plant in Sheffield, Alabama, in 1983, Tom Hendrix started building a stone wall with his bare hands.

Even though it’s still a work in progress, the Wichahpi Commemorative Stone Wall is currently the largest unmortared wall in the United States, built to memorialize Hendrix’s Native American great-great grandmother, Te-lah-nay. The wall represents Te-lah-nay’s journey back to her homeland after being relocated to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears following the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Missing the “singing” Tennessee River she had grown up next to in present-day Florence, Alabama, she spent five years retracing her steps, eventually making her way back to her Yuchi tribe’s native land.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Fall Asleep in Class at Portland, Oregon’s Kennedy School

Posted on: July 29th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

150729_blog-photo_ms_zwickelmania-2491
Kennedy School in northeast Portland, Oregon, was built in 1915.

Go ahead -- drink a beer or take a nap at northeast Portland, Oregon’s Kennedy Elementary School. We promise you won’t get detention.

Since its doors re-opened in 1997, Kennedy School, as it’s now called, has traded in reading, writing, and arithmetic for something a little different, thanks to its new owners, McMenamins. The popular Portland-based chain worked its magic on the long-vacant school, turning it into a combination hotel, restaurant, bar, brewery, theater, music venue, community garden, and community gathering space.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Summer Concert Series] James Brown at the Apollo Theater

Posted on: July 28th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): James Brown and the Famous Flames (Bobby Byrd, Bobby Bennett, and Lloyd Stallworth)
Venue: The Apollo Theater
Location: Harlem, New York City
Date: October 24, 1962
Memorable Moment: After nearly 11 minutes of practically torturing the crowd with “Lost Someone,” Brown slips into "Please Please Please." The crowd responds like the building is collapsing. It’s incredible.
Show Vibe: Thirty-one minutes of desperate flirtation between entertainer and audience swelling with funk, anguish, and lust.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.