Travel

[Historic Bars] Baltimore’s The Horse You Came In On Saloon

Posted on: September 3rd, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

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The Horse You Came In On is Maryland’s only bar to operate before, during, and after Prohibition.

The Horse You Came In On Saloon, located in Baltimore’s Fell's Point Historic District, is the only bar in America that can boast the dual attractions of live music every night of the week and the ghost of Edgar Allan Poe.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] Bryant’s Cocktail Lounge in Milwaukee

Posted on: August 27th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

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Bryant’s Cocktail Lounge is located in Milwaukee’s Historic Mitchell Street Neighborhood.

Bryant Sharp had an idea. And it was a very good one.

Two years after he opened his beer hall in 1936, he decided to turn it into a cocktail lounge. Out went the jukebox and in came the record player. The wooden floors were carpeted, and wallpaper was hung. The windows were blocked, and the lights were dimmed.

Bryant’s Cocktail Lounge was dark. It was swanky. It was the first cocktail lounge in Milwaukee.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Retro Roadmap] Maine Idyll Motor Court in Freeport, Maine

Posted on: August 26th, 2015 by Beth Lennon 4 Comments

 

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The neon sign at the Maine Idyll still lights up the darkness for late-night travelers along Route 1.

Some say "Go Big or Go Home," but at the Maine Idyll Motor Court it’s more like "Stay Small and Stay Homey." This collection of twenty diminutive domiciles is nestled on the side of a tree-lined stretch of Route 1 just north of the hustle and bustle of Freeport, Maine, offering old-fashioned charm and lodging since 1932.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

[Historic Bars] McCrady’s Restaurant in Charleston

Posted on: August 20th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

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McCrady's bar room -- formerly home to horses and stage coaches -- is covered by a skylight along its full length.

There’s something so undeniably charming about Charleston it almost makes your heart hurt. The key lime pie and the soft, salty kiss off the sea air are definitely part of it, but it’s the architecture and the attitude that make any trip to Charleston a travel through not just space, but time.

McCrady’s is the kind of place that makes this happen.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Explore These West Coast Asian-American Heritage Sites

Posted on: August 13th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn No Comments

 

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Seattle’s Panama Hotel has continuously operated as a hotel since it was first constructed, and the first floor holds a tea room that’s open to the public.

What makes the six-story Panama Hotel in Seattle, one of our National Treasures, so special? We could start with the fact that, despite being built in 1910, it's remained remarkably intact over the years, and its basement houses the best surviving example in the U.S. of an urban Japanese-style bath house, or sento. It was designed by Sabro Ozasa, thought to be the first Japanese-American architect to practice in Seattle. And perhaps most powerfully, it still holds the belongings, like trunks, suitcases, and boxes, of Japanese Americans incarcerated in “relocation centers” during World War II.

While Asian American/Pacific Islander historic sites can be found all over the country, we’re taking cues from the National Park Service and highlighting a few West Coast examples that tell the story of centuries of Chinese-American and Japanese-American history. We hope that if you’re ever in that neck of the woods, you’ll take the time to experience the powerful stories they have to tell.  Make your way down from Seattle to Fremont, California, and check out these sites along the way.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Summer Concert Series] B.B. King at the Regal Theater

Posted on: August 10th, 2015 by David Weible No Comments

 

Summer is concert season, and as part of our own summer concert series, we're putting the spotlight on places that have witnessed some of the most memorable musical performances in American history. Some are traditional venues, and others… well, not so much. But they all have two things in common: terrific music and fascinating history.

Liner Notes

Performer(s): B.B. King (Leo Lauchie: bass, Duke Jethro: piano, Sonny Freeman: drums, Bobby Forte and Johnny Board: tenor sax)

Venue: The Regal Theater

Location: Bronzeville, Chicago

Date: November 21, 1964

Memorable Moment: The duration of Sweet Little Angel, It’s My Own Fault, and How Blue Can You Get? (Songs two, three, and four on the Live at the Regal album). If that series doesn’t stir something in you, you may not have a soul.

Show Vibe: Class and soul, all the way.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.