Tools

[10 on Tuesday] How to Preserve Historic Bridges

Posted on: September 3rd, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Written by Kitty Henderson, Executive Director of the Historic Bridge Foundation

Historic bridges give us physical examples of the progress and the development of engineering, architecture, art and technology. And unlike written texts or photographs, historic bridges are living history -- direct, tangible links to different periods in time.

Saving significant and illustrative samples of historic bridges allow us to look back in time, appreciate where we have come from, and plan where we want to go. Here are 10 tips for protecting and preserving historic bridges in your community.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Preserve Historic Cemeteries and Burial Grounds

Posted on: August 20th, 2013 by Sarah Heffern

 

We recently shared how to research the history of historic cemeteries and burial grounds; now it’s time to start saving them. Here are 10 critical steps for preserving historic burial grounds:

1. Determine -- and coordinate with -- the congregation, owners, or governing agency responsible for the land. Cemeteries or burial grounds may be associated with a religious organization, located on private property (which the descendants of those buried there might still own), or under the control of a state or local government. In any event, it’s critical to get the owners on board early for the site’s restoration.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Preserve Historic Train Stations

Posted on: August 13th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 5 Comments

 

Trains -- and the railroads that carried them -- encouraged westward expansion, stimulated industrial and commercial growth, and spurred technological innovation for much of the 19th and 20th centuries. And often, stations were the most important and prominent buildings in town -- the gateways to their communities.

At the height of railroad building during the late 19th century, more than 40,000 depots dotted the country. Now, less than half remain. But with these losses come an opportunity to preserve historically and architecturally significant railroad buildings in creative ways.

Coming up with a viable, in-depth plan for reuse can go a long way in keeping the depot around for the community to enjoy for another century. This toolkit outlines 10 steps your community can take to evaluate and preserve its historic train station:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Preserve Places of Worship, Part Two

Posted on: August 6th, 2013 by Emily Potter 5 Comments

 

As with any type of historic site, churches, synagogues, and mosques can find themselves at risk when no longer in use. The key difference: They have a religious context and sacred atmosphere that deserve special attention and care.

Last week, we began this conversation with ten questions to ask at the outset of any preservation or reuse project concerning a sacred space. This week, we have ten things to consider when planning for the most sympathetic reuse possible of a place of worship.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Preserve Places of Worship, Part One

Posted on: July 30th, 2013 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

A few blocks from my home in Washington, D.C., a non-denominational Christian church is housed in what once was an Irish-Catholic church (as the Celtic cross adorning the steeple makes clear). It always reminds me of the fluid and adaptable nature of our communities, and how a single building can be a part of many histories.

Preservationists, of course, have a role in maintaining that continuity, but because of the spiritual and emotional significance of religious spaces, it’s important to approach them sensitively. In particular, conflict can arise if there’s a feeling that preservationists are prioritizing the building over the religious group’s spiritual needs.

Today’s toolkit offers 10 questions to ask to make sure you’re keeping the congregation’s needs at the forefront of the preservation process. Next week, we’ll delve deeper into the nitty-gritty of the rehabilitation and/or re-use of religious buildings.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.