Tools

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Bousillage

Posted on: June 24th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Roque House, built circa 1797, has bousillage walls on its exterior.

If you’ve ever visited a historic house in Louisiana -- particularly modest mansions, small outbuildings, or cottages of the French Colonial period -- you may have noticed mud walls on the interior or exterior of the building. This idiosyncratic feature is made with a building material called bousillage.

The Trust for Architectural Easements’ Glossary of Architectural Terms defines it as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

If you followed our Down to the Wire campaign to save the James River this spring, you probably noticed a crucial piece of our outreach: the online petition hosted by Change.org.

Change.org is the world’s largest petition platform, with nearly 100 million users in 196 countries. Such widespread use around countless causes and campaigns underscores the power of combining a time-tested tool -- the petition -- with social media and global connectivity.

In today’s toolkit, we’re walking you through top tips for a successful online petition on Change.org so that you can better raise your voice about the preservation issues you care about.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Rhythm

Posted on: June 10th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The south colonnade at George Washington's Mount Vernon displays a pattern of arches and columns.

When I learned to salsa dance, my teacher stressed the importance of listening to the rhythm so that we could keep our steps in time with the music. Keeping in step with the repetitive beats would help us stay oriented and looking pristine as we executed lavish turns and outlandish dips.

Although buildings don’t dance, they do have architectural elements that produce beautiful and unique rhythms. According to Preservation Virginia’s Glossary of Historic Preservation Terms, rhythm, as it pertains to buildings, is defined as:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Parapet

Posted on: June 3rd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 3 Comments

 

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The parapets on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad depot in Kingman, Arizona, are a signature characteristic of the Mission Revival style.

Parapets can be one of those mysterious architectural features in the sense that people may recognize them, but may not know the technical term for them. “A Preservation Handbook for Historic Residential Properties and Districts in Salt Lake City” defines it as:

Parapet, noun

A low horizontal wall at the edge of a roof.

The photo above shows the parapets on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad depot in Kingman, Arizona. The depot's parapets are a signature characteristic of its Mission Revival architectural style.

Word in use: “12. Art Deco and Art Moderne. Both of these styles feature open floor plans, flat or very low-pitched roofs with low profile parapets, smooth stucco walls, and horizontal groupings of metal casement windows.” -- Emily Potter, “[10 on Tuesday] Buying a Historic Home: What’s Your Style? (Part 2)

So the next time you pass by a parapet, don’t be afraid to call it out and demystify the mystery.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] How to Save a Place: Get the Word Out

Posted on: May 28th, 2015 by Julia Rocchi

 

Preservation Month 2015 comes to a close this weekend, but everyone’s hard work to save places that matter to them will continue for months, years, and decades to come. So, for our final installment of the How to Save a Place series, we’re sharing ways you can continue to rally community support for your project.

Methods range from public relations to social media outreach, and from pop-up shops to community tours. (And don’t forget the other popular tactics in our Become an Advocate toolkit!) Here are a variety of tools, techniques, and tips to help you shine a light on the places you love.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the director of digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Historic Feeling

Posted on: May 27th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Prince Room in the Palace of the Governors transports visitors back to 17th-century Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Let's say you’ve been following our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series this month and you run across the Apply for Historic Designation toolkit. You read the post and decide you want to list your historic site on the National Register of Historic Places.

You do your research and read the guidelines for evaluating the integrity of a historic site nominated to the National Register. Your site seems to be a perfect match! The location is on point, and the design, setting, materials, workmanship, and association are perfect. Then you hit a wall -- the abstract stumbling block that is the term "feeling."

Since it is in many ways an abstract concept, historic feeling -- as it relates to preservation -- can be a bit tricky to define. But Preservation Glossary has your back.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.