Tools

 

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Once the hub of the tobacco industry in Durham, North Carolina, this historic factory has been converted into a space for entertainment, residential, retail, and office purposes.

As we shared in part one, preservation talk can be confusing. The acronyms, organizations, and federal laws that make up this movement’s language can all blend together sometimes to create a blanket of bewilderment.

To help you out, we’re focusing this follow-up post on other common terms and concepts that will give you a firm foundation for your preservation work. (For a full list of basic preservation terms, check out our legal and lobbying glossaries.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener

Cassie Keener is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She enjoys writing, spending time outdoors, and is a movie and music enthusiast.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] Retrofitting Historic Windows

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by Julia Rocchi 3 Comments

 

Now that we have a beautiful, new Preservation Tips & Tools template, we're looking back at some of our most popular "10 on Tuesday" toolkits and giving them a refresh with our new look. 

Windows are the most visible, yet most commonly underappreciated, components of older and historic homes and buildings.

In addition to adding beauty and character, original windows serve a great purpose -- they connect the outside of the building to the inside and, as an integral part of the architecture, offer invaluable clues to a building's history.

Despite this value, however, historic windows often get the blame for a building’s energy loss. Most often, people jump to replace their historic windows because a) companies promise that their replacement windows will save clients time and money, and b) it’s promoted as the "green" thing to do. In fact, a thriving industry has grown around this perceived need to replace rather than restore.

A report from our Preservation Green Lab in Seattle, Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaluating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement, tackles this unfortunate perception head-on. The study examines multiple ways you can retrofit (read: modify) your historic windows for better performance, and outlines each option’s energy, carbon, and cost savings across a variety of climates.

The heartening result: Retrofits for historic windows perform comparably to new replacement windows, and almost every retrofit option offers a better return on investment (at a fraction of the cost).... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] Fundamentals of Fundraising

Posted on: May 20th, 2014 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

One critical component of nearly any preservation project is funding. It enables you to hire craftsmen, build advocacy campaigns, purchase materials and equipment, and so much more. However, money won’t just fall into your lap -- so how do you get it?

All research and polling around charitable or philanthropic behavior suggest one inescapable truth: People give because someone asked them. While that’s a strong place to start, there’s a little more to it, so this toolkit provides you with some fundamental steps for fundraising.

If you can put these basics into practice, then you will increase your chances of turning an ask into financial support for your great preservation work.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

 

In The Death and Life of Great American Cities, written in 1961, Jane Jacobs observed, “Cities need old buildings so badly it is probably impossible for vigorous streets and districts to grow without them.”

Older, Smaller, Better: Measuring How the Character of Buildings and Blocks Influences Urban Vitality, a new report from Preservation Green Lab, validates Jacobs' long-respected, but largely untested hypothesis -- that neighborhoods containing a mix of older, smaller buildings of different ages support greater levels of positive economic and social activity than areas dominated by newer, larger buildings.

The three study cities -- San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. -- all have extensive older building stock and strong real estate markets. In this toolkit, we share the highlights from the research as well as the steps your community can take to realize similar benefits. (See the full report and methodology here.)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

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Historic Fifth Ave in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania

In recent weeks, we've shared a couple of toolkits breaking down the partners -- governmental and nonprofit -- that every budding preservationist needs to know (see part one and part two). But once you start getting involved with these groups, it quickly becomes clear: Preservation seems to have a language all its own.  

With a few pointers, however, such as in our glossary of basic preservation terms, it gets easier to crack the preservation code, allowing you to show up at community meetings and preservation review board sessions sounding like a seasoned pro. Today's toolkit covers some of the "legalese" you're likely to encounter in the preservation world.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.