Tools

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Historic Feeling

Posted on: May 27th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson

 

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The Prince Room in the Palace of the Governors transports visitors back to 17th-century Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Let's say you’ve been following our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series this month and you run across the Apply for Historic Designation toolkit. You read the post and decide you want to list your historic site on the National Register of Historic Places.

You do your research and read the guidelines for evaluating the integrity of a historic site nominated to the National Register. Your site seems to be a perfect match! The location is on point, and the design, setting, materials, workmanship, and association are perfect. Then you hit a wall -- the abstract stumbling block that is the term "feeling."

Since it is in many ways an abstract concept, historic feeling -- as it relates to preservation -- can be a bit tricky to define. But Preservation Glossary has your back.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Preservation Tips & Tools] How to Save a Place: Become an Advocate

Posted on: May 26th, 2015 by Sarah Heffern

 

Over the course of this month's How to Save a Place toolkit series, we've covered a lot of ground: managing your expectations during a preservation projectunderstanding the difference between federal, state, and local groups; learning the fundraising basics; sorting through the various types of historic designations, and more. Now, it's time to start thinking like an advocate, because getting other people to support your project -- from your friends and neighbors to government officials -- will be critical to the success of your preservation efforts.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series has guided you through the wilderness of managing your personal expectations during a preservation project, understanding the difference between federal, state, and local preservation groups, and fundraising basics. Today, we’re going to help you navigate through the tricky thicket of historic designations.

For professional preservationists, historic designations are among the primary go-to factors to consider when trying to save a historic site or property. However, for people who don’t spend their days steeped in historic preservation, it’s not always easy to determine what separates a national landmark from a local one -- not to mention all the stops in between.

These tips will help you better understand the difference between federal, state, and local designations, their benefits, and their application processes.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Preservation Glossary] Today’s Word: Cultural Landscape

Posted on: May 20th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 3 Comments

 

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The College of William and Mary's campus was strategically designed to reflect a symmetric layout of brick walkways and vegetation.

The term “cultural landscape” is frequently used in preservation dialogue, but it isn’t always clearly defined or understood. If you’ve ever heard this tricky term but never had a grip on its definition, you can relate to the frustration in trying to understand exactly what a cultural landscape is and how to use it to make your case for preservation. But today, Preservation Glossary is here to help!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

If you’ve been following along with our How to Save a Place toolkit series, your plan to save the historic place that matters to you is likely beginning to take shape. But there’s still one significant element that you probably need more guidance on: fundraising.

It takes money to make things happen. Money enables you to hire craftsmen, build advocacy campaigns, purchase materials and equipment, and much more. Asking for funding doesn’t have to be a daunting challenge, though. No matter your approach, there is one universal truth about fundraising: People give because someone asked them.

This toolkit provides you with some fundamental steps for fundraising. If you can put these basics into practice, then you will increase your chances of turning an ask into financial support for your great preservation work.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

So far in our “How to Save a Place” toolkit series, we’ve covered why historic places matter, how to manage your expectations, and how to research and assess threats to a beloved place. The natural next step is, of course, how to find help -- which can be daunting in an environment where terms like “historic property” and “National Register” get thrown around interchangeably, with little explanation of who is responsible for what part of the process.

The good news is, the best bet is always to start close to home. The saying “all politics is local” is often true of preservation as well, particularly early in the process. Local laws and regulations are the first line of defense in saving many historic places and can usually get the job done, but sometimes it becomes necessary to escalate the fight to the state or even federal level. Knowing the basics of who does what at each level can make navigating preservation a great deal easier.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.