Tools

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Basic Elements of a Preservation Ordinance

Posted on: February 5th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

If you’ve been following along through our toolkit series on establishing a local historic district, you know that your community should develop a task force; understand and communicate the benefits of historic district designation; and decide on where the boundary lines should be set to ensure you keep the “local” in your local historic district.

Next, you’ll need to develop the legislation -- a preservation ordinance -- to protect the historic resources in your community.

A preservation ordinance is a local statute enacted to protect buildings and neighborhoods from destruction or insensitive rehabilitation. It also establishes a design review board (known as the preservation commission) and process, which are critical for securing historic district designation.

Developing a preservation ordinance demonstrates the willingness of a community to recognize, invest in, and protect its historic character. And while every community’s ordinance should be written to meet the specific needs of the area, each should have these 10 basic components:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Preserving African-American Historic Places: New Resource Available

Posted on: February 4th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Brent Leggs, Harvard Loeb Fellow, Boston Field Office

This post was adapted from its original version on the Preservation Leadership Forum blog.

At the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., visitors can tour the Lorraine Hotel, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was killed. Credit: Isaac Singleton Photography, flickr
At the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn., visitors can tour the Lorraine Hotel, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was killed.

In 2004 my job as research assistant for the Kentucky Heritage Council was to inventory Rosenwald Schools in Kentucky. I traveled across the state to document what were the most advanced, architecturally designed school buildings constructed for African-American students between 1917 and 1932.

I was always excited when I found a Rosenwald School standing. Many times, however, nothing was left. It was as if these places had never existed; only landscapes remained, rich with memories of students walking to school. In many cases entire communities had disappeared. People had left rural areas for the big city, leaving significant parts of the history of African-Americans behind. I realized these stories would be all but erased from memory if we didn’t act to protect them.

My experience has shown me that the preservation of historic African-American sites often happens on an informal basis. To be sure, some significant sites associated with African American history are formally recognized and serve as permanent reminders about our ancestors and their journey in America -- for example, the African Meeting House in Boston or the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. But relatively few places that are important to or representative of the African American experience enjoy this level of recognition. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

Over the past several weeks we’ve covered several aspects of creating local historic districts, including deciding to establish a local historic district, considering where its boundaries should be, and getting community buy-in. This week, we’re looking at keeping the local in your historic district, because districts are not a one-size-fits-all solution.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Over the next few months, we’ll be sharing a series of toolkits on managing communications for your preservation project. Public Affairs intern Sarah Coquillat kicks it off this week by showing you the big picture -- the full arc that a robust outreach campaign can take. We’ll dive into each of the steps in more detail going forward, but consider this a general checklist for whenever you’re preparing to take your project public.

Although all campaigns have different objectives, the overarching goal of any media campaign should be to successfully change the behavior of a targeted group. To achieve this, issues must be properly presented to the target audience.

A campaign to save a place can benefit greatly from well-run media outreach, providing an organization with one of its best opportunities to reach its intended audience. Publicly presenting an issue through the media can also help attract the attention of policy and other decision makers who may ultimately decide the outcome of your project.

But where do you start? And where should you end up? Here are 10 steps to building an effective communications strategy that can help take your preservation project over the finish line.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

So you’ve decided you want to establish a local historic district and have considered where its boundaries should be. Now comes perhaps the hardest part: getting your community to buy into the idea.

Shaping local sentiment and opinions is always a complex task, and planning a local historic district is no exception. While the preservation community understands and appreciates its benefits, not everybody might feel as enthusiastic about it. What’s more, all the local stakeholders -- homeowners, government officials, merchants, and property owners -- will endorse, change, or reject proposals depending on how well they understand the issues involved.

So it’s up to the district advocates to make a clear and compelling case about the advantages of a local historic district. Not only will it increase community awareness, but it can also help avoid controversy later by building consensus now.

Here are 10 points you can share with your community stakeholders about what establishing a local historic district will bring to your area.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.