Tools

[10 on Tuesday] Should You DIY or Hire a Professional?

Posted on: May 28th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

Once you've decided whether you need to restore or rehabilitate your historic house, the next step is deciding whether you want to DIY-it or hire a professional.

Taking on a restoration or rehabilitation project can be enjoyable if you like hands-on work, whereas hiring a professional can save you time. Or, you might want to do a little of both, where you work on the projects you’re passionate about and contract experts to finish the rest.

Whatever approach you take, the decision involves knowing how much time and money you want to spend, what your interests are, and what skills you’re looking to hire someone for. This toolkit explains different types of professionals who can help you, plus important things to consider before hiring them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

 

Last week, after completing our series on how to buy a historic house, we embarked on the next step in the process: deciding whether to restore or rehabilitate your home. Once that’s decided, the fun really begins, since it involves playing detective. There are clues all around to what your house may once have looked like; you just need to know where to look.

We covered the go-to-the-library angle before in our 10 Ways to Research Your Home’s History toolkit, so today we’ll look more closely at what your house and its immediate surroundings might be trying to tell you. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Our previous toolkit series walked you through the steps of finding and buying a historic house. Now the search is over, and you’re the proud owner of a new old home -- congratulations! Sooo … now what?

As you’ll find out, historic homeownership brings with it a unique set of questions, decisions, and goals. Our next toolkit series is designed to guide you through the process and offer practical advice on how to make the most of your historic home.

Let’s address one of the most basic questions first: Should you restore or rehabilitate your house? Your decision will influence the house’s finished character, the project cost, and the amount of time it takes. It will also impact how much of the work you take on yourself and how much you’ll hand off to professionals.

With this in mind, here are ten things to keep in mind to determine which approach will work best for you:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

 

You've launched your search for a historic house, figured out how to finance it, and thoroughly checked whether it’s in good condition. Now you think you’re ready to buy -- so you’re done, right?

Well, almost. Before you sign on the dotted line, use this handy summary checklist -- the final item in our series on buying a historic home -- to make sure you've covered all your bases. (We’ll be back next week with toolkits on getting you settled into your new old house.)

Here are the top 10 questions to ask yourself before putting your John Hancock on the contract:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

 

In our ongoing series about buying a historic home, we've covered how to find a historic house, determine its architectural style (parts One and Two), and finance the cost. Today we're on to the next step in the process -- how to inspect the house to make sure it is in good condition.

Of course, a professional inspection -- which will cover many of these same areas, but with greater depth and accuracy -- is necessary once you move from looking to buying, but knowing what to look for while you're shopping around can help you make your decision!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.