Social Media

 

As a social network, Twitter is a celebration of real-time human experience. It's ephemeral: Messages come and go as the Twitter feed updates, and news and messages sink to the bottom of the screen -- and the reader's consciousness -- within a matter of seconds. The social media network seems to be built on the idea that what's happening is valued above what happened, and that new is more important and relevant than old.


The planted roof deck of Twitter's new headquarters inside the 1939 Merchandise Mart building.

Which is why Twitter's real-life move to the 1939 Art Deco San Francisco Merchandise Mart building in the city's up-and-coming Mid-Market neighborhood, instead of something more UFO-like in the middle of Silicon Valley (see Apple's proposed new headquarters), is a pleasant surprise. With the move, Twitter is helping to prove that being on the cutting edge doesn't have to mean "out with the old," and that where we've been -- architecturally, historically -- is as relevant as where we're going.

According to Ed Axelsen, Twitter's Director of Facilities:

"A revitalized building like SF Mart offered Twitter several key advantages: it's centrally located for public transportation; the building has lots of light, it has huge floor plates, it offered the possibility of outdoor space; and perhaps most appealing, it's an historic building that is being revitalized for modern use."

Check out their new old building in the slideshow below. As you can see, they've adapted the interior to fit their brand -- dynamic, fun, and innovative --  while acknowledging the critical importance of urban and historic context for moving modern communication, their company, and this corner of San Francisco forward.

(All photos by Troy Holden / @Twitter on Flickr)

Editor's note: This seems as good a time as ever to remind you that, yes, the National Trust is on Twitter! Follow us at @PresNation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

 

Habitat for Humanity's excellent work building homes in partnership with families that need them is well-known in many communities -- but their work as preservationists is a bit more under the radar. A growing realization that a good home requires a good neighborhood has led many of their affiliates to take a more holistic approach, one that involves rehabilitating buildings and revitalizing struggling communities.


One of four Victorian cottages relocated and restored by Habitat for Humanity of Teller County in Cripple Creek, Colorado. Read their story.

This is, of course, an idea near and dear to our preservationist hearts -- and a couple of years back, the National Trust partnered with Habitat for Humanity to develop resources to help Habitat affiliates become more active in preservation. (And Habitat World magazine returned the favor earlier this year with a gorgeous feature about some recent success stories.)

To help preservationists and Habitat affiliates continue to learn more about one another, we’ve invited Duane Bates (@habitat_org) and Shala Carlson (@HWEditor) to join us for the July #builtheritage Twitter chat. We’ll discuss why preservation is a good fit for some Habitat affiliates, the challenges -- and rewards -- of uniting home-making with preservation, and learn a bit about Habitat’s plans for future preservation-focused work.

The chat will take place on July 11, 2012 from 4:00-5:00 EDT. (Regular #builtheritage participants take note: this is one week later than our usual first-Wednesday-of-the-month chat date because of the July 4th holiday.) ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Like Us on Facebook for Exclusive "11 Most" Preview

Posted on: June 4th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

This Wednesday, America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places -- our annual list of threatened treasures around the country -- will turn 25. Since its inception in 1988, the National Trust’s "11 Most" list has become one of the most effective tools for saving our country's diverse architectural, cultural, and natural heritage.

As we were preparing our formal announcements and events leading up to this year's list, we decided to do something a little different. We'll be announcing the full list of 2012 sites on Wednesday, but this year we're giving an exclusive "11 Most" preview to our Facebook fans one day earlier. All you need to do is like the National Trust on Facebook, then watch our timeline on Tuesday, June 5, for a sneak peek available only to our fans.

We hope you'll join us tomorrow for our preview announcement, and look forward to revealing the entire list on all of our media channels on Wednesday.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

In 1992, the once-magnificent West Baden Springs Hotel was added to the National Trust’s list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. Lauded as the largest glass and steel dome in the world when it was constructed in 1902, the hotel fell into disrepair in the early 1990s, and its future looked bleak. The listing, however, proved a turning point, and today -- after a full restoration -- it is once again one of America’s top resorts.

This is but one of many success stories that have resulted from the "11 Most" list over its 25 year history, but we at the National Trust are far from alone in developing and publicizing endangered lists for the places we love -- many organizations on the state and local level do, too.

What makes these lists successful? And how does the awareness created by a list translate into action?

We'll be discussing these questions and more in the June #builtheritage chat on Twitter, which just happens to be on the date of our annual 11 Most announcement. (Translation: We'll be sharing our list and chatting about it, too.)

The chat will take place on June 6, 2012 from 4:00 -5:00 EDT. Here's how to participate:

1. Sign in to Twitter, TweetDeck or TweetChat. We (the chat moderators) usually use TweetChat since it adds the hash tag automatically and allows for easy replies and re-tweets.

2. Follow and tweet with the hashtag #builtheritage.

3. Watch for the questions in the Q1 format. Provide answers using the A1 format, and interact with other participants using replies and retweets.

Oh, and what we mean by the Q1/A1 format is this: Questions (we usually have four per chat) are posed by the moderators as Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4 about every 15 minutes. We ask that chatters reply with A1, A2, etc. to help everyone stay clear on what they’re responding to. A lot of side conversations and such still break out, but it helps keep things at least a little organized.

Hope you can join us -- but even if you can't, we'll share a transcript of the chat afterwards.

Speaking of which, sharing the transcript from this month's chat -- when we discussed jobs in preservation -- somehow fell through the cracks, so here it is. Better late than never, I hope.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Preservation Round-Up: Found on Facebook Edition

Posted on: May 24th, 2012 by David Garber 2 Comments

 

Today's Preservation Round-Up is a selection of stories you alerted us to on our Facebook page. As much as we have our ear to the ground for local preservation stories and efforts around the country, we can't be everywhere at once, so we greatly appreciate your shares. Here are some recent posts worth checking out.

Historic Preservation Needs in Los Angeles

"I've just created a shared google map for alerting folks to historic preservation emergencies in their LA communities. Click to see what's in danger near you, and please add any place you are worried about which is not already on the map."

The Last Humble Gas Station

"Humble Oil was once the most important oil company in Texas with service stations stretched across the state and huge refineries that supplied both Texans and motorists across the country."

Massive Fergus Falls, Minnesota Hospital in Danger of Demolition

"What would you do with 700,000+ square feet of pretty much raw space? The Historic Fergus Falls State Hospital (now RTC) is in need of your ideas. No idea is too outlandish - what would you do with this building?"

Philadelphia's Historic St. Peter’s Church Needs You

"St. Peter’s is one of those places that makes you realize you can go home again.  From her beautiful windows to the high boxes inside the church, to the climb up the stairs for a look out over the church yard, St. Peter’s is just a very cool place."

Kickstarter to Restore a Historic Building and Open a Coffee House

"I am trying to save this historic building and create a gathering place for the community and visitors! The Kickstarter project is to help raise the funds to complete the restoration of the building and create an outdoor space open to the public." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.