Social Media

Twitter Chat Recap/Reminder: From Windows to Fundraising

Posted on: November 29th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 

We've been talking a lot about windows here at the National Trust lately, thanks in large part to our colleagues in the Preservation Green Lab, who published a great report (Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaluating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement) in October that gave us a lot of detailed information about the energy efficiency of historic windows.

The report's authors joined us for our monthly Twitter chat in November to talk about their findings and discuss how we can get the information out to people who are considering replacing their windows when repairs would be better for the building, the environment, and their wallet.

Here are some highlights of the conversation:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

Tweet Chat Reminder: Let's Talk Windows on November 7

Posted on: November 6th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

Since the dawn of the preservation movement -- or, at least it seems that way -- preservationists have been touting the value of maintaining historic windows. We know them to be one of the most defining characteristics of a building, as well as one that can be made highly energy-efficient, but with the constant drumbeat of replacement window advertising, our words are often drowned out.

However, with the arrival of the latest report from the Preservation Green Lab, Saving Windows, Saving Money: Evaluating the Energy Performance of Window Retrofit and Replacement, we now have all sorts of research to back up our claims about historic windows. (See our 10 Things You Should Know About Retrofitting Historic Windows for highlights.)

We'll be discussing the report -- and how to talk about it to the home and business owners in your community -- during this month's Twitter chat, taking place tomorrow, Wednesday, November 7, from 4:00-5:00 EST.

How to participate:

1. Sign in to TwitterTweetDeck or TweetChat. We (the chat moderators) usually use TweetChat since it adds the hash tag automatically and allows for easy replies and re-tweets.

2. Follow and tweet with the hashtag #builtheritage.

3. Watch for the questions in the Q1 format. Provide answers using the A1 format, and interact with other participants using replies and retweets.

What we mean by the Q1/A1 format is this: Questions (we usually have four per chat) are posed by the moderators as Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4 about every 15 minutes. We ask that chatters reply with A1, A2, etc. to help everyone stay clear on what they’re responding to. A lot of side conversations and such still break out, but it helps keep things at least a little organized.

Hope to "see" you at the chat!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Ways to Use Pinterest for Preservation

Posted on: October 23rd, 2012 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

Earlier this year, Pinterest arrived on the social media scene like a cool new kid showing up in school -- one everyone couldn’t wait to sit next to at lunch.

Online, though, that kind of popularity is worth a lot more than free meals; it means going from a tiny, invitation-only site to 25 million unique views per month in just about a year (per Fast Company). And it also means a lot of people with a lot of businesses and causes saying, “Is this useful to my work?”

For those of us in the historic preservation, house museum, and Main Street worlds, the answer is very much YES. Pinterest is, at its core, a place for sharing pictures of pretty things. Historic places are pretty, but it goes well beyond that, too.

To help demystify the latest social craze, here are 10 tips for using Pinterest -- five for getting started, and five easy, preservationist-friendly ideas for content to share.

1. What is Pinterest, exactly? It’s where the corkboard on your wall meets your web favorites and becomes social -- it's bookmarking, with pictures, that you can share. But instead of having one corkboard like on your wall, you can have as many as you want, and each can have its own theme. For example: National Treasures. Historic Travel. The color yellow. (Really.) Each pin links back to the site it came from, so if you are sharing content from your own website, you’ll be driving traffic right where you want it!

2. How do I use it? Visit www.pinterest.com to sign up for an account, and use the built-in tools to identify your interests and find people to follow.

Tip: Take a moment to install the “Pin It” button that makes pinning fast and easy.

3. Create some boards. Pinterest is a great way to show visually what your site, museum, or community is about, so when you’re planning your boards, think about what story you want to tell. Are you into “neato architecture”? Or maybe about “finding your cool”?

4. Pin. Once you've decided on what your story is, pin items -- from your website, partners (see item #9 below), or other sites -- that support the story you want to tell.

5. And re-pin. A big part of the culture of Pinterest is sharing, so be sure to watch the feeds of the pinners you follow. If you have picked folks with similar interests and/or organizations within your community, you’ll find lots of pins to share -- or re-pin, as it's called.

6. Say “I do.” Pinterest is a hotbed for planning weddings and other events. So if your site, museum, or Main Streets hosts weddings and other social events, post as many pictures of it as you can, and link it back to the related info on your website.

7. Cook up interest in your site. Food is another popular topic on Pinterest, so use recipes to tell the story of your site or community.

8. Think about your partners. If you don’t have wedding photos to share or your own tasty food, do you work with photographers and caterers when you’re hosting events? Of course you do! Coordinate with them to cross-promote their service at your site.

9. Use the search function. A great way to find more great things to pin is to use the search. You'll find pins from people who have visited, or want to visit, your site. Click through on their pins, and you may even make your way to blog posts or online reviews that say nice things. Re-pin those too!

10. Expand your online store. Does your historic site or Main Street shop sell things online? Share them on Pinterest to give them additional visibility.

Tip: If you include the price of your item with a dollar sign ($15.00, for example), Pinterest will automagically flag it as something that can be purchased.

Are you a pinning-for-preservation whiz -- or know someone who is? Let us know in the comments.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

Twitter Chat Recap: The Language of Preservation

Posted on: October 12th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 

Last week's Twitter chat on the way we talk about preservation was one of the most active hours we've had since starting -- almost more than I was able to keep up with! Turns out preservationists are nearly as passionate about how they talk about their work as they are in doing it.

I am not sure, however, that we came up with any answers. Everyone agreed that having a professional lexicon is important when preservationists are dealing with each other or related fields, but also agreed that it was important to communicate in a less jargon-laden way with people in the community. Perhaps that awareness will help us all get started in using more friendly language when we're working with the public. 

Here are some highlights of the conversation:


As usual, we have a transcript available -- but chat participants and longtime readers might notice it's not as complete as in the past. Some recent changes in the way Twitter works have made getting a full transcript nearly impossible; our apologies for any inconvenience!

The next chat will be Wednesday, November 7 at 4:00 pm EST. We'll be joined by our colleagues at the Preservation Green Lab to talk about their latest report on the value of rehabbing historic wood windows. Save the date and plan to join us!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Great Ways to Engage Preservationists on Facebook

Posted on: October 9th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 


The High Line in New York City.

One of the things that can make jumping into social media daunting for preservationists -- well, anyone, really -- is figuring out what to share in order to create a lively, engaged community. Here are 10 ways that preservation-friendly groups are keeping the conversation going on Facebook.

1. Share pretty pictures. That saying about "a picture is worth a thousand words" is doubly true when it comes to Facebook, where even a small page can draw people in with a great photo. And while we might not have kittens, puppies, or babies to share on our preservation-themed pages (not usually, anyway) we do have gorgeous buildings, amazing historic photos, and charming ruins. Like this one, for example.

2. Ask questions. Paired with a pretty picture (see #1), National Public Lands Day keeps their fans engaged even after their big event is over by asking them to weigh in on questions like "One of my favorite fall outdoor activities is ______ ."

3. Keep 'em guessing. On the Civil War Trust's page, they play "Name that Battlefield" by sharing a photo and asking their fans to identify where it came from.

4. Go trivial. The National Parks Conservation Foundation hosts "Trivia Tuesdays" where they encourage folks to visit their page on Pinterest to answer a trivia question about a National Parks site.

5. Take it on the road. I don't think the folks at Vintage Roadside go anywhere without their cameras -- their page is full of captured-in-the-moment roadside attractions (along with the occasional scanned old-timey photo). And the fact they're all mid-century eye candy doesn't hurt, either!

Tip: If you have an iPhone, add the pages manager app for easy access to your page when you're away from your desk.

6. Help people connect offline. Buffalo's Young Preservationists share links to a lot of local events to help build real-world community -- not just online camaraderie.

7. Ask your supporters to share. The California State Parks Foundation is asking people to share their "Defend What's Yours" photos on the foundation's page. This helps build awareness of the campaign while also giving fans a little face-time. And the High Line asks folks to share their photos when they have public events.

8. Extra! Extra! Read all about it! If your fans know you're a reliable source for all things historic or all things built environment (or both!) they'll keep coming back to your page. See the National Park Service's link to a story about their newest park, César E. Chávez National Monument.

9. Offer a simple action. On the Save Prentice Facebook page, a bold "Take Action" button brings fans right to a petition asking the Commission on Chicago Landmarks support landmarking the historic hospital.

10. Think outside the page. A lot of organizations default to gathering fans on a page, which makes it easy for that group/org to talk to everyone at once. But many projects actually work better if people are talking among themselves and bouncing ideas around -- just what Facebook's groups functionality was made for! Take it from the folks at Preservation-Ready Sites, a Buffalo-based group where many different people are driving the conversation.

What are your favorite ways to engage other preservationists on Facebook?

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JUST ADDED: Check out the slides that spotlight these great examples and share them with others interested in building the cause of preservation!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.