Social Media

Celebrating 25 Years of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places

Posted on: May 7th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 29 Comments

 

Wide open space: that's something North Dakota has a lot of. However, if you’ve ever explored this part of Big Sky Country, you know that the prairie – which seems to stretch and roll endlessly – is often punctuated by simple, yet remarkable church houses.

Built by first-generation settlers from Germany, Poland, Iceland, Russia, and Scandinavia, these structures served as the glue for rural life. By the early 2000s, though, many had seen better days – it was estimated that as many as 400 of the churches were vacant and directly threatened with demolition. Something had to be done.

In 2001, the prairie churches of North Dakota were added to the National Trust's list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. What ensued was a grassroots effort led by Preservation North Dakota that, to this day, works community by community to save these amazing treasures.

The rebirth of these prairie icons is one of hundreds of success stories born out of our annual endangered list. In fact, since its inception in 1988, the list has become one of the most effective tools for saving our country's architectural, cultural, and natural heritage. Of the 234 places that have been listed over the years, only a few have been lost. That's a track record worth celebrating, and this is the year to do it.

2012 marks the 25th anniversary of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. As we prepare for this year's announcement (save the date: Wednesday, June 6), we invite you to follow along online as we spotlight a quarter-century of people saving amazing places. Here's where you can find us:

  • Pinterest: Each Thursday, we'll create a board dedicated to a former listing that is back from the brink. Follow throughout the day as we curate tons of amazing photography, all snapped by people who are passionate about that place.
  • Twitter: Put your preservation knowledge to the test with trivia tweets about former listings. Keep an eye on hashtag #SavingPlaces for all the action.
  • Our Blog: Check back here each Tuesday for a special post on an 11 Most success story. We'll offer insight into how former listings were saved, and of course, some really awesome photos.
  • Facebook: Who doesn't like to be in the know? On Tuesday, June 5, we'll offer our fans an exclusive sneak peek at a place to be included on this year's endangered list.

Also, be sure to check out our website, which we've updated with one amazing story per year of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

Which of these places inspires you?

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

It's hard to believe, but it's almost Twitter chat time again! And, for the first time, we're revisiting an earlier topic: preservation jobs. With graduation season upon us, and many newly accredited preservation professionals looking for work, it seems worth discussing again. We'll be chatting about online resources for job hunting, work in fields tangential to preservation, the skills needed to succeed in preservation, and more. Come armed with your best job-hunting advice!


Preserving an ornamental iron fence in Savannah, Georgia. (Photo: ncpttmedia on Flickr)

The chat will take place this Wednesday, May 2, from 4:00-5:00 pm EDT. As always, we'll be hanging out at the #builtheritage hashtag. If you're new to the chat, here's how to get involved:

1. Sign in to Twitter, TweetDeck or TweetChat. We (the chat moderators) usually use TweetChat since it adds the hash tag automatically and allows for easy replies and re-tweets.

2. Follow and tweet with the hashtag #builtheritage.

3. Watch for the questions in the Q1 format. Provide answers using the A1 format, and interact with other participants using replies and retweets.

Oh, and what we mean by the Q1/A1 format is this: Questions (we usually have four per chat) are posed by the moderators as Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4 about every 15 minutes. We ask that chatters reply with A1, A2, etc. to help everyone stay clear on what they’re responding to. A lot of side conversations and such still break out, but it helps keep things at least a little organized.

See you online on Wednesday!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Check In on Foursquare, Unlock the Preservation Nation Badge!

Posted on: April 27th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 

Ah, Friday afternoon, that time of the week when many people's thoughts start straying towards the weekend. (Not mine, of course. I am totally focused on work.) If your plans for the next two days involve visiting historic places, and you're on Foursquare, I have a challenge for you: unlock the Preservation Nation badge on Foursquare!

That's right: the National Trust for Historic Preservation now has a badge on Foursquare. We're not really allowed to tell you how to get it, other than you need to follow PresNation on Foursquare to do so. We have more than 500 tips loaded into the site, so you can pick up fun facts about historic places nationwide.  The badge will be available for a limited time only, so start checking in now!

By the way -- if you do check in somewhere and unlock our badge, we'd love to see where you are. If you upload a photo on Foursquare and "shout" it to us on Twitter using the hashtag #savingplaces, we may feature your photo in a future blog post.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Twitter Chat in Review: Main Streets

Posted on: April 17th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern

 

Despite being a week later than usual, April's Twitter chat was once again a lively conversation. To help cover our topic - Main Streets - more thoroughly, we were joined by Andrea Dono (better known in the Twitterverse as @NatlMainStreet) from the National Trust Main Street Center. We discussed cool Main Street rehabs and promotions, how online content and social media can help Main Streets (pro tip: make your location, phone number, and hours really, really easy to find), and the challenges faced on Main Streets.


Vintage postcard from Evansville, Indiana. (Image: alandberning on Flickr) ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

Ask any preservation fan where they prefer to shop -- on Main Street or at a strip mall -- and I'd be willing to bet upwards of 90% of them would first look at you like you were insane, and then confirm what you already suspected -- their hearts (and wallets) are with their local downtowns.


Vintage postcard from Andrews, North Carolina. (Image: Cowtools on Flickr)

But in a time that prizes big box over mom and pop, how have Main Streets become those places that we love so much? A big reason is the ideals that have been promoted by the National Trust Main Street Center for more than 30 years. Hot off the heels of another successful National Main Streets conference, we'll be joined by our friends at Main Street for this month's Twitter chat.

We'll discuss challenges facing Main Streets, cool adaptive reuse projects, and -- because on a Twitter chat, how could we not? -- how technology (online directories, social media, etc.) impact how people find and interact with local businesses.

We'll be online from 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. EDT tomorrow, Wednesday, April 11.

Here’s how to participate in the chat:

1. Sign in to Twitter, TweetDeck or TweetChat. We (the chat moderators) usually use TweetChat since it adds the hash tag automatically and allows for easy replies and re-tweets.

2. Follow and tweet with the hashtag #builtheritage.

3. Watch for the questions in the Q1 format. Provide answers using the A1 format, and interact with other participants using replies and retweets.

Oh, and what we mean by the Q1/A1 format is this: Questions (we usually have four per chat) are posed by the moderators as Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4 about every 15 minutes. We ask that chatters reply with A1, A2, etc. to help everyone stay clear on what they’re responding to. A lot of side conversations and such still break out, but it helps keep things at least a little organized.

In the event you can't join us, don't worry - we'll have a transcript available online within a few days. Hope to chat with you tomorrow!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.