Slideshows

[Sitings] African Meeting House, Nantucket

Posted on: July 13th, 2013 by Mame McCully 1 Comment

 

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The African Meeting House on York Street in Nantucket, Mass.

Nantucket, Mass., a popular and picturesque summer destination, is home to the African Meeting House and the Seneca Boston-Florence Higginbotham House. Sites of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, these historic structures tell the story of the 19th-century African-American community on the island.

Spend a few minutes virtually touring this special site:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Slideshow] Exploring Iconic Wilshire Boulevard

Posted on: July 12th, 2013 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

The intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Grand Avenue, one of the anchors of the route, featured a pedestrian zone with food trucks, performances, public programs, and information booths, where participants could pick up handy guidebooks to learn about the architecture as they travel up and down the street.
The intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Grand Avenue, one of the anchors of the route, featured a pedestrian zone with food trucks, performances, public programs, and information booths, where participants could pick up handy guidebooks to learn about the architecture as they travel up and down the street.

On June 23, thousands of bicyclists, skateboarders, rollerbladers, walkers, and other non-motorists (including more than a few unicyclists) took to the streets and explored iconic Wilshire Boulevard up close, without the usual ambiance of car horns and exhaust fumes.

It was the latest CicLAvia, a recurring event that closes Los Angeles streets to motor vehicles, creating a new way to explore the city, while calling attention to the possibility of a more car-free L.A. In this seventh CicLAvia, a 6.3-mile portion Wilshire Boulevard was closed down for seven hours, from downtown to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

And this time, the street’s Modern architecture was on full display.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Sitings] James Madison's Montpelier

Posted on: July 6th, 2013 by Mame McCully

 


Montpelier was the home of the Madison family. James Madison's grandfather settled at the property in the 1720s.

For those looking for a patriotic way to spend their Fourth of July holiday weekend, look no further than James Madison’s Montpelier, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Orange, Virginia. The lifelong home and 2,650-acre estate of James Madison -- Father of the Constitution, Architect of the Bill of Rights, and fourth President of the United States -- is just a short drive from our nation’s capitol.

This site is the perfect place for families, history lovers and those who want to experience the beautiful surrounding landscape. Can't make it out there this weekend? Visit via slideshow:

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

 

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Beacon Towers. "And as the moon rose higher, the inessential houses began to melt away."
-- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

In the afterglow of Baz Luhrmann’s summer adaptation of The Great Gatsby, we looked at some inspirations for the novel's Long Island palaces. Yet many of these grand Gilded Age sites now lie in ruin, while others have been demolished. Here is a look at some of Long Island's lost treasures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

 

An interior look of the portion of the Willow Run Bomber Plant that is waiting to be rescued, renovated, and resurrected so it could continue to tell stories of the Second World War. Credit: Dennis Norton
An interior look of the portion of the Willow Run Bomber Plant that is waiting to be rescued, renovated, and resurrected so it could continue to tell stories of the Second World War.

Many places -- and many hands -- contributed to the war effort during the Second World War, which lasted from 1939 to 1945. One exceptional story: the Willow Run Bomber Plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, which not only housed mass production for military aircraft, but also employed women to rivet those planes together.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.