Slideshows

[Slideshow] Touring Los Angeles' Modern Skyline

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Lauren Walser

 

Sleek steel and glass skyscrapers are interspersed with structures from an earlier era, making Bunker Hill a unique collection of Art Deco, Beaux Arts, and Corporate International architecture.
Sleek steel and glass skyscrapers are interspersed with structures from an earlier era, making Bunker Hill a unique collection of Art Deco, Beaux Arts, and Corporate International architecture.

Standing in the shadows of the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles’ Bunker Hill area, it’s hard to imagine what the neighborhood once was: a quiet, upscale community, with elegant Victorian homes that housed the city’s social elite.

How times have changed.

In the 1950s and ‘60s, with the city’s population soaring and the neighborhood’s residents relocating to other parts of the city, Bunker Hill underwent a major redevelopment. Streets were reconfigured and the once-stately houses were razed, replaced with the towering corporate skyscrapers that we see today, in what is now a major financial center.

These sleek glass and steel Corporate International Style buildings are on display this summer, as the Los Angeles Conservancy hosts weekly Modern Skyline Walking Tours as part of the Getty initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. (You can read more about this initiative, and check out a tour I took of the modern residential architecture of Pasadena, Calif.)
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Announcing the 2013 List of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places

Posted on: June 19th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

San Jose Church - Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. Built in 1532, San Jose Church is of the few remaining Spanish Gothic architecture structures in the Western Hemisphere. Closed for 13 years, it is threatened by deterioration and structural damage. Photo courtesy Archdiocese of San Juan of Puerto Rico.
San Jose Church in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico, one of this year's listings.

With a country as large and diverse as the United States selecting a list of just 11 endangered historic places annually is a daunting task -- which is why this year, as our endangered list enters its second quarter-century, we opened up the process to the general public for the first time.

The results were overwhelming. We received more than twice the nominations we have in the past, with passionate local preservationists reaching out from sites nationwide.

The resulting list of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places represents the broad cultural, geographic, and historic diversity of our country. The "newest" site -- the flying-saucer-shaped Worldport Terminal at JFK Airport in New York -- dates from the mid-20th century, while the oldest -- San Jose Church in San Juan, P.R. -- was built more than 400 years earlier.

Without further ado, the 2013 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list, in slides...

And in video:

Want to learn more about this year's listings? Later this morning, from 11:00 a.m. to noon EDT, National Trust President Stephanie Meeks (@SavePlacesPres) will be participating in a Twitter chat about the 11 Most Endangered List. She will be taking questions and discussing the 2013 list, and several of the listed sites will also be available during the chat. To join the chat:

 1. Sign in to Twitter, or into a chat-specific site such as tchat.io, twubs.com, or oneqube.com. (Using a chat site allows you to filter just the chat-specific hashtag, and also appends it to any tweets you send, allowing for a more streamlined experience.)

2. Follow and tweet with the hashtag #11Most.

Hope to see you there!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

The House that Radio Built: NPR's New Headquarters Celebrates Preservation

Posted on: June 18th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 4 Comments

 

NPR’s new headquarters building, where old effortlessly meets shiny and new.
NPR’s new headquarters building, where old effortlessly meets shiny and new.

For most people, moving means cardboard boxes, heavy lifting, and forgetting where you packed your underwear. However, for National Public Radio, a recent relocation meant making something old new again.

NPR’s shiny new headquarters is built atop the National Register-listed Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company Warehouse. As an anchor in an emerging neighborhood, the organization is a terrific example of how preservation supports the future.

National Trust correspondents Jason Clement and Julia Rocchi had the chance to tour the building. Here’s what they thought -- to quote NPR’s “founding mother” Susan Stamberg -- of “the house that radio built.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Sitings] Hotel de Paris: French Flair in Colorado

Posted on: June 15th, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Exterior of the Hotel de Paris. Credit: Flowercat, Flickr
Exterior of the Hotel de Paris

The Hotel de Paris, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is located in Georgetown, Colorado. A historic town about an hour from Denver, visitors can spend the day enjoying the area or can spend the weekend in the relaxing environment.

You can find the Hotel de Paris on the main street in town which also features shops, restaurants and for those with a sweet tooth, plenty of places to buy an ice cream cone this summer to eat as you stroll.

The Site just opened for the season today and will be welcoming visitors until December 15. Come visit and enjoy!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Slideshow] Cincinnati's Workers Murals: Historic Treasures on the Move

Posted on: June 8th, 2013 by David Robert Weible

 

Winold Reiss traveled to local Cincinnati industries and businesses in search of scenes to capture in his murals. Pictured here is a scene from American Laundry Machinery Inc., which at the time, was the world’s largest producer of industrial laundry equipment. This mural is one of the nine that will have to be moved.
Winold Reiss traveled to local Cincinnati industries and businesses in search of scenes to capture in his murals. Pictured here is a scene from American Laundry Machinery Inc., which at the time, was the world’s largest producer of industrial laundry equipment. This mural is one of the nine that will have to be moved.

They've done it before. The question is whether they can do it again.

With the completion of Cincinnati’s new Art Deco Union Terminal in 1933, officials commissioned over 18,000 square feet of art for its walls meant to transform the city’s image from one to be avoided on cross-country train travel, to a desired stopover. The largest portion of that space went to Winold Reiss, who set about depicting the industrial prowess of the Cincinnati area with 23 glass mosaic tile murals.

But after train service ceased at Union Terminal in 1972, and with the impending demolition of the concourse, 14 of the murals depicting specific scenes from local industries and businesses like Procter & Gamble, ended up being the ones on the move.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.