Slideshows

Miami Instagrammers Take Over Miami Marine Stadium

Posted on: October 28th, 2013 by Adriana Gallegos 1 Comment

 

Instameet_1_salfars

Want to catch someone’s attention in Miami? Then you better do something flashy, fun, and visually appealing.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Adriana Gallegos

Adriana Gallegos

Adriana Gallegos is the Blogger Outreach Manager working to inform bloggers and online influencers about the National Trust’s mission. In her free time she enjoys spending time with family both in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Burgos, Spain.

 

The Brooklyn Public Library was designed to look like an open book. Credit: Roberta Lane
The library's central branch is a striking building combining Art Deco and Scandanavian Modernist elements, completed in 1941 on Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn. The design was meant to evoke an open book.

Last week, the Brooklyn Public Library central branch celebrated the completion of restoration of their entrance doors, made possible by the Partners in Preservation program, a partnership between the National Trust and American Express.

In 2012, Partners in Preservation chose 40 diverse historic places all over New York City to compete for $3 million in preservation funding by appealing to the public for votes. The Brooklyn Public Library won the popular vote, and with it, $250,000 for their preservation project.

Now, a year later, you can see the fruits of the partnership in completed projects such as these doors. Here's my take on the Brooklyn Public Library's milestone, filtered through Instagram.

The newly restored doors at Brooklyn Public Library. The Brooklyn Public Library was designed to look like an open book. Credit: Roberta Lane

The people who created this library system understood that providing beautiful, inspiring public buildings was as important to the community as it was to build robust library collections. The library's entryway is framed with glowing, gilded figures from history and lore. To enter a great library is to pass into other, bigger worlds, and the Brooklyn Public Library's fine entryway draws patrons into that elevated experience like nothing else could.

Working on the Brooklyn Public Library's doors. The Brooklyn Public Library was designed to look like an open book. Credit: Roberta Lane

The library's users are among the most diverse in the country, and it serves as a vibrant center of community. A huge range of places in all five NYC boroughs competed for Partners in Preservation funding, from the Guggenheim and the Apollo, to a small church in Staten Island and a stately historic house museum in the Bronx. But the Brooklyn Public Library won the public vote by appealing to Brooklynites' love for their iconic library.

Interior of the Brooklyn Public Library. The Brooklyn Public Library was designed to look like an open book. Credit: Roberta Lane

With Partners in Preservation, the National Trust and American Express sought to help historic places to meet their immediate restoration needs. But by driving them to ask the public for votes, we also wanted to help them build their visibility and base of support, and to engage with people about the importance and relevance of NYC's multifaceted history.

Roberta Lane speaks at the celebration of the Brooklyn Public Library's door restoration. The Brooklyn Public Library was designed to look like an open book. Credit: Roberta Lane

I just moved to Brooklyn in March to staff the National Trust's new New York Field Office. Before speaking at the ribbon-cutting, I snuck away to spend some time in the local history part of the library, poring over historic images of the Brooklyn streets I've been exploring. As a preservationist, I was happy to be part of this celebration of the Brooklyn Public Library's restoration success. As a new resident of Brooklyn, I was particularly glad for the chance to thank the library for caring for this place we all value, and ensuring that it will endure.

Find Roberta on Instagram at robertal7, and the National Trust at presnation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Roberta Lane

Roberta Lane

Roberta Lane is the Senior Field Officer and Attorney for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s New York City Field Office. She has been with the National Trust since 2006, delivering preservation technical assistance and legal guidance in the field.

The (Nearly) Forgotten History of Maxville, Ore.

Posted on: September 27th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

In the Fall issue of Preservation magazine we interview Gwendolyn Trice, whose search for her own history led her to quit her day job in Seattle and relocate to eastern Oregon to preserve the memory of the now-defunct logging town that originally brought her family to the Pacific Northwest.

The town -- known as Maxville -- popped up in the 1920s in Wallowa County, and drew both white and black workers from all of the American South and Midwest. Though the town was segregated, the hard work and brutal weather brought the community together.

You can find the full story in the print edition of Preservation. (Forum Journal also has a great article available for members, titled "Breathing Life into a Ghost Town: The Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center.")

In the meantime, here are some cool photo extras that show the history of Maxville and its community.

Gwendoyn Trice in Maxville. Credit: Colby Kuschatka... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Behind the Scenes in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Posted on: September 26th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Ark., is now a brewery and distillery. Credit: Rush Jagoe
Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Ark., is now a brewery and distillery.

Our travel feature in the Fall issue of Preservation magazine puts the spotlight on Hot Springs, Ark., an unexpected gem in the Ouachita Mountains where thermal waters played a huge role in the city's past -- and are now influencing its future.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

See the Unseen: Amazing 3-D Views of Historic Churches and Theaters

Posted on: September 26th, 2013 by Lauren Walser 2 Comments

 

Reconstructed Chapter House. Vina, California. (2013)

For the past two years, San Francisco-based designer Scott Page has been taking his 11-lb. 3-D laser scanner into historic churches and theaters all around the Bay Area, including Bernard Maybeck’s First Church of Christ, Scientist in Berkeley and the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, collecting point clouds of data and photographic images to quickly and accurately map every detail of a building’s interior, down to each visible beam and pipe.

“[Scanning] allows you to visualize buildings in ways you couldn’t see them before,” Page says. “You can really get to places where you couldn’t before, even just five years ago.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.