Slideshows

Behind the Scenes in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Posted on: September 26th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Ark., is now a brewery and distillery. Credit: Rush Jagoe
Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Ark., is now a brewery and distillery.

Our travel feature in the Fall issue of Preservation magazine puts the spotlight on Hot Springs, Ark., an unexpected gem in the Ouachita Mountains where thermal waters played a huge role in the city's past -- and are now influencing its future.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

See the Unseen: Amazing 3-D Views of Historic Churches and Theaters

Posted on: September 26th, 2013 by Lauren Walser 2 Comments

 

Reconstructed Chapter House. Vina, California. (2013)

For the past two years, San Francisco-based designer Scott Page has been taking his 11-lb. 3-D laser scanner into historic churches and theaters all around the Bay Area, including Bernard Maybeck’s First Church of Christ, Scientist in Berkeley and the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, collecting point clouds of data and photographic images to quickly and accurately map every detail of a building’s interior, down to each visible beam and pipe.

“[Scanning] allows you to visualize buildings in ways you couldn’t see them before,” Page says. “You can really get to places where you couldn’t before, even just five years ago.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

It Takes a Village: How Boise, Idaho is Celebrating its Sesquicentennial

Posted on: September 23rd, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more -- it was a great party!
The BOISE 150 SESQUI-PARTY on July 7, 2013 commemorated the 150th anniversary of the first platting of Boise. An estimated 16,000-20,000 people attended and were treated to performances at four different staging areas by local musicians, cultural groups, dancers, storytellers, and more.

This year, Boise, the capital city of Idaho, celebrates its 150th anniversary. Explorers and missionaries began arriving in the Boise River's fertile valley in the early 1800s. The U.S. military established Fort Boise on July 4, 1863. By 1867, the town consisted of 140 blocks and its population almost tripled between 1900 and 1910.

Throughout the 20th century and into the 21st, Boise grew in population, economy, and culture. Hewlett-Packard and Micron Technology led the city in technological advancements, while the environment -- the Boise Foothills, River, and surrounding desert -- enjoys preservation. Today, Boise’s creative energy and artistic entrepreneurship continues to move the city forward.

The Boise City Department of Arts & History led the effort to commemorate Boise’s 150th anniversary -- or sesquicentennial -- in 2013, which evolved into a wide-scale initiative: BOISE 150. With support from the mayor and city council members, a small but passionate crew comprised of city staff, contractors, volunteers, and grantees developed an array of programs to celebrate Boise’s past, present, and collective future.

Want to see how the whole city is in on the act? Check out the BOISE 150 slideshow after the jump.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

[Sitings] Touro Synagogue: 250 Years in the Making

Posted on: September 14th, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Touro Synagogue, the oldest synagogue building in the United States. Credit: Joseph A, Flickr.
Touro Synagogue, the oldest synagogue building in the United States.

Touro Synagogue, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Newport, Rhode Island, was dedicated in 1763 and is the oldest synagogue building in the United States. The synagogue is considered one of the most architecturally distinguished buildings of 18th-century America and the most historically significant Jewish building in the United States.

Each year, over 30,000 visitors cross the synagogue threshold to pray, see its magnificent interior, and hear its remarkable story. Check out the slideshow to see more.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Sitings] Cliveden: Historic Estate and Battle Site

Posted on: September 7th, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Cliveden was built between 1763 and 1767 by Benjamin Chew and in the more than 200 years to follow, seven generations of his family went on to live in the mansion. Credit: Michael Feagans, Flickr.
Cliveden was built between 1763 and 1767 by Benjamin Chew and in the more than 200 years to follow, seven generations of his family went on to live in the mansion.

Cliveden, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is located on 5.5 acres of historic parkland in northwest Philadelphia. Discover this unique site and learn more about the people who lived there and the role this place played in American history and freedom.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.