Slideshows

[SLIDESHOW] How Preservation Transformed Two Small Towns in Kansas

Posted on: December 26th, 2012 by Gwendolyn Purdom 3 Comments

 

For our upcoming winter issue of Preservation magazine, I had a chance to travel to rural Plainville and Hays, Kansas, where I spent a few days with entrepreneur Chuck Comeau, the founder of Dessin Fournir and a designer who has been buying up empty historic storefronts and reviving them to house his luxury furnishings business and other ventures for nearly 20 years.

The magazine didn’t have enough pages to include all the cool pictures photographer Jason Dailey took of these now-vibrant communities, so we’ve put together a slideshow for you with some of the shots that didn’t make it to print. Enjoy!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[SLIDESHOW] Merry Christmas from the Historic Village of Zoar!

Posted on: December 25th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

The setting sun over the Zoar Garden. Credit: Andy Donaldson
The setting sun falls over the Zoar Garden.

What better way to celebrate the warmth and joy of the season than by returning to one of our most photogenic historic sites, the Historic Village of Zoar?

Local photographer Andy Donaldson, ever ready with his camera, captured the town's recent Christmas in Zoar event, and we wanted to share some of his favorite shots with you. Enjoy this National Treasure in all its winter beauty, and Happy Holidays to you and yours!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[SLIDESHOW] Holidays and History at the White House

Posted on: December 19th, 2012 by Sarah Heffern 1 Comment

 

Vermeil Room. Credit: Sarah M. Heffern

When I was a little kid, I remember my dad looking at the massive amount of Christmas decorations that came out of the attic every year and saying to my mom, "You decorate like you were raised in an orphanage!" We all took this to mean that he thought my mom perhaps over-did things a bit, and in a way, he was right: Mom did decorate every surface in our house.

But I, as a result, am wildly enthusiastic about Christmas decorations, so I jumped at the chance when a friend -- and National Park Service preservation colleague -- offered me one of her tickets to see the White House all tricked out for the holidays. (Fun fact: The White House is a National Park.)

The White House, I am happy to say, did not disappoint. While my mother was not in any way involved in the decorating process, her "decorate everything" ethic was clearly on display. From tabletops to mantles and from archways to the Presidential Seal, our president's home was festively -- and beautifully -- adorned.

Here are some of my favorite snapshots of my White House visit -- enjoy!

Descriptions of the decorative themes of the rooms are taken from the booklet "Joy to All: Holidays at the White House 2012," which is provided to all visitors.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

[Slideshow] Remembering Pearl Harbor: A Personal Reflection

Posted on: December 7th, 2012 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 


USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor.

As a writer at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, I often get to talk with local preservationists and hear about their thoughts, memories, and feelings on places they love. I enjoy telling their stories and getting to feel like a part of something bigger. Today, I have my own story to share.

Three weeks ago, I visited Pearl Harbor, one of our country’s most poignant historic places and one that we are remembering and honoring today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

Report from the Field: Sandy's Impact on Ellis Island

Posted on: November 30th, 2012 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 2 Comments

 

Written by Roberta Lane, Senior Field Officer & Attorney, Boston Field Office


The storm surged onto the South Side of Ellis Island, depositing debris and flooding the basements of the historic hospital and administration buildings.

One month after Hurricane Sandy barreled into the East Coast, repair and restoration continues apace at homes, religious structures, downtowns, parks, historic sites, and beyond. In particular, the damage at Ellis Island (one of our National Treasures) provides a snapshot of one kind of post-Sandy reality.

Our National Treasure and America’s 11 Most Endangered Places listings for Ellis Island focused on the 30 vacant buildings on the island to highlight their plight. These buildings have stood the test of time while they wait for a reuse. We were already concerned about their condition, though, so early reports that the stormwaters surged right over the island distressed us.

Indeed, Hurricane Sandy flooded through Ellis Island with a vengeance. Today, the National Park Service is working heroically, in awful conditions, to assess and repair the damage, and we are working with them and Save Ellis Island to try to ensure a brighter future for the south side of the island, a place that has endured so much.

The following slideshow features my photos from a staff trip to the south side of Ellis Island in spring 2012. Consider it a virtual tour, one that might deepen this site's significance for you:

Since the storm, we’ve met with the National Park Service and Save Ellis Island to learn about the current conditions and coordinate our assistance. Of note:

  • One vacant building -- the Ferry Building -- was restored a few years ago by the National Park Service and Save Ellis Island. The storm blew out windows and doors at the Ferry Building and inundated the exhibits and interiors inside.
  • At the vacant US Public Health Service buildings, boarding meant to protect windows was blown out and water got into the lower areas.
  • The grand Main Building had basement flooding, destroying the island’s mechanical systems and most other parts of its infrastructure.
  • The grand Immigration Hall and most exhibits at the Main Building were unaffected.

The National Park Service is finishing its assessments and stabilization of the many units of the National Parks of New York Harbor that were damaged in the storm. We plan to work with our partners to connect preservation professionals from the field with the Park Service’s experts, as needed. And we are building a broad coalition of agencies and organizations to help support the work ahead.

Ellis Island stands for a complex and wonderful American ideal: that we should garner the benefits of major change through immigration, while always ensuring our nation’s fundamental stability and constancy. This concept of well-managed change is also, of course, a value at the heart of historic preservation -- one we hope to demonstrate at this important site.

Post-storm photos are at the National Park Service's Sandy Response Flickr site. Also check out the National Park Service’s fascinating Facebook page, NPS Hurricane Sandy Response. Ellis Island was my first Instagram adventure. Find the National Trust Instagram at @presnation.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.