Slideshows

[Slideshow] Sitings: Belle Grove Plantation

Posted on: March 23rd, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Spring has sprung and at Belle Grove Plantation in Middletown, Virginia, this means that this historic site opens for the season just as it has every year since 1967. A short trip from Washington D.C., the site and historic Cedar Creek Battlefield are a perfect stop if you are passing by on a roadtrip or if you want to escape for a day from a nearby city.

Check out some of the beautiful vistas and fun facts from this historic site of the National Trust:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

 

The wood shakes on the house were deteriorating by the time Fenton purchased the property. He consulted with architects, fellow historic homeowners, and manufacturers of products designed for historic buildings in order to learn how to best repair them. He eventually stripped and re-stained each shake by hand.

It is said to be the largest Craftsman residence ever built, and now, after an extensive 25-year restoration, the three-story house in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles known as Artemesia is celebrating its centennial.

Built in 1913, Artemesia was designed by architect Frank A. Brown for the family of engineer Frederick E. Engstrum, whose father founded a major Southern California construction company.

After passing through the hands of several owners, the house sat largely neglected since the early 1940s, until advertising executive Leonard Fenton purchased the house in 1987 at the tender age of 23.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

The city of Miami at dawn as viewed from the Miami Marine Stadium seating area.
The city of Miami at dawn

In the Spring 2013 issue of Preservation magazine, we’ll be featuring one of our National Treasures, the Miami Marine Stadium. Producing the story required navigating an ocean of red tape -- filling out film permits and “hold harmless” agreements with the city of Miami, providing proof of insurance, etc. -- all to get approval to photograph the stadium, which stands abandoned behind a chain link fence and locked gate.

Abandoned, but not unused.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman is editor in chief of Preservation magazine. He’s lived all over the United States but currently resides in Baltimore where he is restoring a 1918 center hall Colonial.

 

Redevelopment plans for the furnaces include a possible sound stage or concert hall.

Redevelopment plans for the furnaces include a possible sound stage or concert hall.

What happens when you try to save something that was never meant to be preserved?

This is a question that August Carlino, president and CEO of the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area in Pennsylvania, is trying to answer. He’s searching for the best way to transform the Carrie Furnaces, two blast furnaces built in 1907 as part of the Carnegie Steel Company’s Homestead Works, into something that the post-industrial Pittsburgh region can be proud of.

“These things were never meant to be saved the way they were built,” Carlino says of the two remaining 92-foot-tall blast furnaces, which once produced about 1,250 tons of “pig iron,” used in the production of steel, a day. “They were meant to be put to some use and torn down, and for something else to be built there.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Slideshow] Sitings: Shadows-on-the-Teche

Posted on: March 16th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 4 Comments

 

The Shadows at magic hour. Credit: adie reed, Flickr
The Shadows at magic hour

You can't help but get a little more pep in your step when spring arrives, and for preservationists, that often means escaping the indoors to go visit beautiful historic places.

But in case you can't make it to all those places on your historic bucket list right now, we'll bring the scenery to you -- with a fresh slideshow each week featuring shots and scenes from the lovely historic sites of the National Trust.

First up: The Shadows in New Iberia, Louisiana. March is one of the most beautiful times of the year to visit this historic antebellum house museum, with live oaks, Spanish moss, and the Bayou Teche bringing nature right up to the front door. The Shadows is open year-round, Monday thru Saturday, with guided tours daily, so definitely plan a visit if you're in the area.

We hope one day you have the chance to experience the rich culture and history of this Gulf Coast treasure firsthand. In the meantime, enjoy this week's Sitings slideshow!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.