Slideshows

[Slideshow] Philly Painting: One Community's Extreme Makeover

Posted on: March 26th, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

As you’ll see in our spring issue of Preservation, one dilapidated business corridor in north Philadelphia is finding there’s a surprising amount of power in a few -- okay, a lot of -- cans of paint.

Dutch artists Dre Urhahn and Jeroen Koolhaas have joined forces with the city’s Mural Arts Program and enlisted a group of locals to give the neighborhood’s collection of run-down commercial buildings new life with a Technicolor update, in a project called Philly Painting.

We include one before and after image in the print magazine, but there are plenty more transformations worth seeing among the late 19th-century and early 20th-century buildings where the work has been taking place. Take a look...... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Slideshow] Sitings: Belle Grove Plantation

Posted on: March 23rd, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Spring has sprung and at Belle Grove Plantation in Middletown, Virginia, this means that this historic site opens for the season just as it has every year since 1967. A short trip from Washington D.C., the site and historic Cedar Creek Battlefield are a perfect stop if you are passing by on a roadtrip or if you want to escape for a day from a nearby city.

Check out some of the beautiful vistas and fun facts from this historic site of the National Trust:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

 

The wood shakes on the house were deteriorating by the time Fenton purchased the property. He consulted with architects, fellow historic homeowners, and manufacturers of products designed for historic buildings in order to learn how to best repair them. He eventually stripped and re-stained each shake by hand.

It is said to be the largest Craftsman residence ever built, and now, after an extensive 25-year restoration, the three-story house in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles known as Artemesia is celebrating its centennial.

Built in 1913, Artemesia was designed by architect Frank A. Brown for the family of engineer Frederick E. Engstrum, whose father founded a major Southern California construction company.

After passing through the hands of several owners, the house sat largely neglected since the early 1940s, until advertising executive Leonard Fenton purchased the house in 1987 at the tender age of 23.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

The city of Miami at dawn as viewed from the Miami Marine Stadium seating area.
The city of Miami at dawn

In the Spring 2013 issue of Preservation magazine, we’ll be featuring one of our National Treasures, the Miami Marine Stadium. Producing the story required navigating an ocean of red tape -- filling out film permits and “hold harmless” agreements with the city of Miami, providing proof of insurance, etc. -- all to get approval to photograph the stadium, which stands abandoned behind a chain link fence and locked gate.

Abandoned, but not unused.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman is editor in chief of Preservation magazine. He’s lived all over the United States but currently resides in Baltimore where he is restoring a 1918 center hall Colonial.

 

Redevelopment plans for the furnaces include a possible sound stage or concert hall.

Redevelopment plans for the furnaces include a possible sound stage or concert hall.

What happens when you try to save something that was never meant to be preserved?

This is a question that August Carlino, president and CEO of the Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area in Pennsylvania, is trying to answer. He’s searching for the best way to transform the Carrie Furnaces, two blast furnaces built in 1907 as part of the Carnegie Steel Company’s Homestead Works, into something that the post-industrial Pittsburgh region can be proud of.

“These things were never meant to be saved the way they were built,” Carlino says of the two remaining 92-foot-tall blast furnaces, which once produced about 1,250 tons of “pig iron,” used in the production of steel, a day. “They were meant to be put to some use and torn down, and for something else to be built there.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.