Slideshows

[Slideshow] Exploring "Iconic" Places with Photographer Brian Vanden Brink

Posted on: March 29th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

ICONIC Book Jacket/Cover, 2012.

Brian Vanden Brink has been photographing unforgettable historic places since the 1970s, when he moved to the coast of Maine and began shooting for architects and magazines. Since then, he has cemented a reputation as one of the nation’s foremost architectural photographers.

“The images in Iconic, my sixth book, cover more than 35 years of this work -- my whole photographic life,” he says. “It’s almost like a personal travel journal documenting experiences with buildings I feel are important ... Whether it’s because of the way these structures sit in the landscape -- or what they represent culturally or socially -- I felt they had to be brought together for readers to see and appreciate.”

James H. Schwartz, the National Trust’s vice president for editorial and creative strategy, recently spoke with Brian to learn more about his work and inspirations.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Slideshow] A Makeover for the Mayo Building

Posted on: March 27th, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

A majestic relic of turn-of-the-20th century Tulsa, Okla., the Mayo Building, erected by two of the state’s founders, Cass and John Mayo, is the last remaining building in the city’s original “skyscraper district.” But as recently as 2005, the structure was abandoned and derelict.

Enter developer Wiggin Properties, LLC and architects Kinslow, Keith & Todd, who transformed the forgotten property into a mixed use residential and commercial building, earning the $30 million project the 2012 National Housing & Rehabilitation Association’s Best Historic Rehab Utilizing New Market Tax Credits award, among other recognition. There’s now even a permanent display in the structure’s public spaces that tells the Mayo Building’s unlikely story.

Take a look at our slideshow to find out more about this inspiring makeover.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Slideshow] Philly Painting: One Community's Extreme Makeover

Posted on: March 26th, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom

 

As you’ll see in our spring issue of Preservation, one dilapidated business corridor in north Philadelphia is finding there’s a surprising amount of power in a few -- okay, a lot of -- cans of paint.

Dutch artists Dre Urhahn and Jeroen Koolhaas have joined forces with the city’s Mural Arts Program and enlisted a group of locals to give the neighborhood’s collection of run-down commercial buildings new life with a Technicolor update, in a project called Philly Painting.

We include one before and after image in the print magazine, but there are plenty more transformations worth seeing among the late 19th-century and early 20th-century buildings where the work has been taking place. Take a look...... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Slideshow] Sitings: Belle Grove Plantation

Posted on: March 23rd, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Spring has sprung and at Belle Grove Plantation in Middletown, Virginia, this means that this historic site opens for the season just as it has every year since 1967. A short trip from Washington D.C., the site and historic Cedar Creek Battlefield are a perfect stop if you are passing by on a roadtrip or if you want to escape for a day from a nearby city.

Check out some of the beautiful vistas and fun facts from this historic site of the National Trust:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

 

The wood shakes on the house were deteriorating by the time Fenton purchased the property. He consulted with architects, fellow historic homeowners, and manufacturers of products designed for historic buildings in order to learn how to best repair them. He eventually stripped and re-stained each shake by hand.

It is said to be the largest Craftsman residence ever built, and now, after an extensive 25-year restoration, the three-story house in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles known as Artemesia is celebrating its centennial.

Built in 1913, Artemesia was designed by architect Frank A. Brown for the family of engineer Frederick E. Engstrum, whose father founded a major Southern California construction company.

After passing through the hands of several owners, the house sat largely neglected since the early 1940s, until advertising executive Leonard Fenton purchased the house in 1987 at the tender age of 23.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.