Slideshows

 

Built for oil company executive John (Jack) W. Norton, the Norton House’s colors and materials blend with its natural surroundings -- part of the architects’ beliefs that there should be no strict divisions between interior and exterior spaces.
Built for oil company executive John (Jack) W. Norton, the Norton House’s colors and materials blend with its natural surroundings -- part of the architects’ beliefs that there should be no strict divisions between interior and exterior spaces.

A couple Saturdays ago, I spent the day touring some truly amazing Modern-era homes in Pasadena, Calif., all dating from 1950 to 1983. In a city renowned for its unparalleled collection of early-20th-century Craftsman bungalows, it was exciting to see an equally important, if less celebrated, side of Pasadena’s architectural legacy.

After all, a number of big names in Modern architecture made their mark on Los Angeles in the early- and mid-20th century, including Richard Neutra, Rudolph M. Schindler, and Gregory Ain. And the contributions of these Modernists to Pasadena had a distinctly Southern California feel: light, natural materials; rich landscaping focusing on native plants; and lots and lots of windows and glass paneling to elegantly blend the indoors and out, making full use of the endless sunshine.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

The abandoned Frontier Drive-In in Center, Colo.
The abandoned Frontier Drive-In in Center, Colo.

The drive-in theater is an American summertime classic, and June 6 marks the 80th anniversary of the opening of the very first theater in Camden, N.J. in 1933. Park-In Theaters, the brainchild of chemical company magnate Richard Hollingshead, charged 25 cents for each car and an additional 25 for each passenger, and advertised with the slogan, “The whole family is welcome, regardless of how noisy the children are.”

A number of these nostalgic spaces are still in operation in the U.S. (as of 2012, the number stood at 368), but abandoned drive-ins also dot the American landscape, their weathered screens and dilapidated ticket booths serving as reminders of a bygone era. Craig Deman, a Santa Monica, Ca.-based photographer, has made it his mission to document these remnants in 10 different states over four years. His images are both evocative and haunting.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Sitings] Lower East Side Tenement Museum: Elevating the Ordinary

Posted on: June 1st, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Visitors to the Lower East Side Tenement Museum get to explore the history of the Lower East Side and the lives of its former residents. Once home to 7,000 immigrants between 1863 and 1935, this area of New York City offers the stories of those who came to the United States looking for a new and better life.

A popular museum for locals and tourists, don’t miss this unique experience. Take a look through our slideshow, and also learn more about the museum's new "Shop Life" exhibit.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Sitings] Chesterwood: A Sculptor's Idyllic Retreat

Posted on: May 25th, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

Each year, during the month of May, French left his permanent home and studio in New York for six months and moved with his family to Chesterwood, where he worked on over 200 public and private commissions. He shared this house with his family during these summers.
The main house at Chesterwood

Chesterwood, a Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Stockbridge, Mass., offers visitors the chance to enjoy a retreat in the Berkshires just as America’s foremost sculptor, Daniel Chester French, did during his lifetime.

French, who is best known as the creator of the Minute Man and Abraham Lincoln for the Lincoln Memorial, owned this country home, studio, and gardens. Each year, during the month of May, French left his permanent home and studio in New York for six months and moved with his family to Chesterwood, where he worked on over 200 public and private commissions.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Slideshow] From Wild to Whimsical: The Gargoyles and Grotesques of Washington National Cathedral

Posted on: May 20th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 6 Comments

 

By Linda S. Glisson, Assistant Director for Information Resources, Main Street

Washington National Cathedral. Credit: Linda S. Glisson
Washington National Cathedral

As a passionate photographer and preservationist, I’m always on the lookout for fascinating buildings, from the funky to the sublime. Washington National Cathedral, winner of this year’s Partners in Preservation contest and also one of our National Treasures, is definitely the latter.

From the light streaming through stained glass windows and bathing the interior in a rainbow glow to the fantastical creatures that adorn the outside, National Cathedral is a photographer’s dream. Every time I visit I discover something new. And no wonder: There are 112 gargoyles, the last completed in 1987, and more than 3,000 grotesques and other architectural carvings.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.