Slideshows

 

130702_blog_photo_gatsbybeacon1
Beacon Towers. "And as the moon rose higher, the inessential houses began to melt away."
-- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

In the afterglow of Baz Luhrmann’s summer adaptation of The Great Gatsby, we looked at some inspirations for the novel's Long Island palaces. Yet many of these grand Gilded Age sites now lie in ruin, while others have been demolished. Here is a look at some of Long Island's lost treasures.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

 

An interior look of the portion of the Willow Run Bomber Plant that is waiting to be rescued, renovated, and resurrected so it could continue to tell stories of the Second World War. Credit: Dennis Norton
An interior look of the portion of the Willow Run Bomber Plant that is waiting to be rescued, renovated, and resurrected so it could continue to tell stories of the Second World War.

Many places -- and many hands -- contributed to the war effort during the Second World War, which lasted from 1939 to 1945. One exceptional story: the Willow Run Bomber Plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, which not only housed mass production for military aircraft, but also employed women to rivet those planes together.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam

Paulina Tam is an intern at Preservation magazine as well as the Features Co-Editor of The Observer at Fordham University. A WWII and aviation fanatic, she maintains a growing collection of WWII model airplanes that accompanies her hometown writing station.

[Sitings] President Lincoln’s Cottage: Abe's Home Away From Home

Posted on: June 29th, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

President Lincoln's Cottage is the most significant historic site directly associated with Lincoln's presidency aside from the White House. During the Civil War, President Lincoln and his family resided here from June to November of 1862, 1863, and 1864.
President Lincoln's Cottage is the most significant historic site directly associated with Lincoln's presidency aside from the White House.

Most people associate Abraham Lincoln with the White House, but one of the most pivotal times in our 16th president's career took place at this Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation -- President Lincoln's Cottage.

President Lincoln lived in this Gothic Revival Cottage in Washington, DC, for 13 months from June to November of 1862-1864, and regularly commuted to the White House. More importantly, he developed the Emancipation Proclamation onsite, leading to its reputation today as "the cradle of emancipation."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Sitings] Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House

Posted on: June 22nd, 2013 by Mame McCully

 

130621_blog_photo_leighey
A "Usonian" house, Pope-Leighey House was developed as a means of providing affordable housing for people of moderate means.

The Pope-Leighey House, designed by famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright, is located just outside Washington. D.C. in Alexandria, Virginia. This Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation is located at Woodlawn, a 126-acre estate that was originally part of George Washington’s Mount Vernon.

Commissioned in 1939 by Loren Pope, a journalist in Falls Church, the residence was sold to Robert and Marjorie Leighey in 1946. The house was in the path of an expansion of Highway 66, so in an effort to preserve the building, Mrs. Leighey gave the property to the National Trust, which relocated it to nearby Woodlawn.

Visitors should take time to explore both historic houses -- and as you will see, the Pope Leighey House should not be missed!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Mame McCully

Mame McCully is a marketing manager at the National Trust. Her heart is forever in the Midwest, but she loves to travel, explore new places, and spend time with family and friends.

[Slideshow] Touring Los Angeles' Modern Skyline

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Lauren Walser

 

Sleek steel and glass skyscrapers are interspersed with structures from an earlier era, making Bunker Hill a unique collection of Art Deco, Beaux Arts, and Corporate International architecture.
Sleek steel and glass skyscrapers are interspersed with structures from an earlier era, making Bunker Hill a unique collection of Art Deco, Beaux Arts, and Corporate International architecture.

Standing in the shadows of the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles’ Bunker Hill area, it’s hard to imagine what the neighborhood once was: a quiet, upscale community, with elegant Victorian homes that housed the city’s social elite.

How times have changed.

In the 1950s and ‘60s, with the city’s population soaring and the neighborhood’s residents relocating to other parts of the city, Bunker Hill underwent a major redevelopment. Streets were reconfigured and the once-stately houses were razed, replaced with the towering corporate skyscrapers that we see today, in what is now a major financial center.

These sleek glass and steel Corporate International Style buildings are on display this summer, as the Los Angeles Conservancy hosts weekly Modern Skyline Walking Tours as part of the Getty initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. (You can read more about this initiative, and check out a tour I took of the modern residential architecture of Pasadena, Calif.)
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.