Slideshows

Palace of the Governors: A Time Capsule of Santa Fe’s Diverse History

Posted on: August 5th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

By Kirsten Hower

Indian Detours personnel group photo with Harvey cars lined up in front of Palace, c. 1926 - 1930.
Indian Detours personnel group photo with Harvey cars lined up in front of the Palace of the Governors, c. 1926 - 1930.

Located in the heart of downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, the Palace of the Governors is one of the oldest, in-use public building in the United States. Once the seat of power, the Palace now showcases the diverse and colorful history of Santa Fe and its peoples. This Exposure slideshow takes you on a virtual tour of this unique historic place.


Palace of the Governors by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Summer Party at the Glass House

Posted on: August 3rd, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation No Comments

 

Visitors enjoy the annual Summer Party at Glass House. June 13, 2015.
Visitors enjoy the annual Summer Party at Glass House.

The annual Summer Party at the Glass House, Philip Johnson's 1949 structure in New Canaan, Connecticut, is always a crowd-pleaser, and this year was no exception. Guests gathered at the 49-acre property to view and bid on art, feast on a picnic lunch, play croquet and ping pong on the lawn, and enjoy the perfect summer afternoon.

If you couldn't make it to this year's events, don't worry: You can view our collection of photos here.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

[Photos] Explore the Ancestral Places of Southeast Utah

Posted on: July 21st, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

By Kirsten Hower

Encompassing nearly eight thousand square miles, the Ancestral Places of Southeast Utah are home to a diverse array of sites sacred to the Navajo, Hopi, Pueblo, and Ute tribes. Throughout the area are archaeological sites, cliff dwellings, petroglyphs, and trails that are a visual narrative dedicated to twelve thousand years of human history and traditions.

Explore that narrative in our latest Exposure with stunning images from these ancestral places.


Ancestral Places of Southeast Utah by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

A New “Constellation” Over Bannerman Castle

Posted on: July 9th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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"Constellation" rises over Bannerman Castle.

There's a new set of stars shining over the ruins of Bannerman Castle, a former military surplus warehouse on Pollepel Island in the Hudson River 60 miles north of Manhattan. It's the work of Beacon, New York-based artist Melissa McGill, who grew curious about the island and its mysterious brick and stone structure as she passed them by train.

After researching the island's history, McGill worked with local preservation groups to install 17 poles around the ruins, ranging in height from 40 to 80 feet, each with a solar-powered LED light on top. One by one, the lights turn on at sunset, creating a new constellation above the ruins.

Some lights mark a current architectural feature of the castle; others mark what was once there. Together, they create a set of stars connecting the castle’s past to its present.

Constellation will shine above Bannerman Castle for the next two years. Check out the photo essay below for more about the history of this island and how this public art project is shaping the skies.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Photos] Une Belle Maison: The Lombard Plantation House

Posted on: June 30th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

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Left: S. Frederick Starr in front of the fully-reconstructed kitchen house on his Lombard Plantation property. He was able to rebuild the kitchen house from scratch using 19th-century notarial drawings. Right: When Starr initially purchased the Lombard Plantation house, a cement-block biker bar called Sarge’s sat in the front yard. 

We’re excited to feature the story of the Lombard Plantation house -- one of the last 19th-century plantation houses still in existence inside New Orleans’ city limits -- in the 2015 Summer issue of Preservation magazine. We couldn’t fit all of the wonderful photos of the house inside our six-page spread, so to make sure they didn’t go to waste, we’re featuring a selection of outtakes by photographer Sara Essex Bradley here.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Photos] Roadside Rest Shelters

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

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This rest area stands against the desert backdrop near Abiquiu, New Mexico.

Think back to your last road trip. Where did you stop for a bite to eat? What scenery did you study when you paused to stretch your legs?

Before options like drive-thrus and commercial travel centers made road travel a little more convenient, small roadside rest areas, many of which were built as part of the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, were a driver’s only option.

On a drive from Los Angeles to Austin, Texas, in 2007, photographer Ryann Ford took notice of these rest shelters. “As a photographer, it’s hard not to notice them,” she says. “They’re perfect minimalist structures set on a perfect landscape. And they’re each different in their own way.”

For the last six years, Ford has traveled the country documenting rest shelters along highways and in state and national parks.

“I think they tell the story of a different time,” she says. “Now, we’re so rushed with our travel. We just want to get from point A to point B really quickly, whether it’s by plane or jumping on the fastest highway and getting there as fast as possible. If you eat, it’s through a drive-thru. [These rest shelters] tell the story of a different era in travel, when it was about the journey.”

You can explore Ford’s full collection of photographs in her book, The Last Stop: Vanishing Relics of the American Roadside, due out from powerHouse Books next spring. Until then, you can see a sampling of her photos in the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation.

We’ve also shared a few more of her images here. And we’d love to hear from you. Share your memories of roadside rest areas below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.