Restoration

Colorado’s 1911 Silverton School Hits Preservation High

Posted on: February 3rd, 2014 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

Silverton’s 1911 school serves grades K-12 and sits at 9,305 feet above sea level. Credit: Scott Smith
Silverton’s 1911 school serves grades K-12 and sits at 9,305 feet above sea level.

Everything is a little tougher in Silverton, Colo. Take, for example, breathing. At more than 9,300 feet, the town of some-600 sits in pretty thin air.

Then there’s the issue of getting there. Accessible only by high-mountain pass or the historic Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, making the trek is nothing to sneeze at.

Needless to say, residents of this former mining town and National Register Historic District in southwestern Colorado are a hearty bunch, so when it came time to preserve their historic 1911 schoolhouse, there were no ifs, ands, or buts about it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

A New Experiment for the Eero Saarinen-Designed Bell Labs Building

Posted on: January 30th, 2014 by David Robert Weible 4 Comments

 

The massive atrium of the Bell Labs building. Credit: s o d a p o p, Flickr
The massive atrium of the Bell Labs building

The Bell Labs building has been the site of countless advances in science and technology since its completion in 1961. In its time, it’s hosted the work of multiple Nobel Prize winners, including that of Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, who in 1964 discovered the universal background radiation that helped prove that our universe is expanding, and led to the general acceptance of the Big Bang Theory.

Needless to say, a building with that much cultural heritage is practically priceless to preservationists, but the fact that it was designed by Eero Saarinen makes it that much sweeter. Now, the building that almost went the way of the Dodo will play host to a whole new experiment.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

By Kathleen M. Yasas, President, Save The Sherburne Inn Restoration Project, Inc.

A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today. Credit: Rick L. Crowell Photography
A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today.

There was no Jimmy Stewart. No basket full of cash spilled onto a table to get George Bailey out of trouble. No little girl telling her daddy that every time a bell sounds an angel gets his wings. But there is no question that angels were close by on December 6, 2013, when The Sherburne Inn opened its doors for the first time in more than decade to welcome over a hundred people to gather and celebrate the rebirth of a century-old landmark.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Historic Touro Synagogue Celebrates 250 Years of Religious Freedom

Posted on: January 22nd, 2014 by Katherine Flynn 2 Comments

 

Touro Synagogue was originally built in 1763. Credit: dbking, Flickr
Touro Synagogue was originally built in 1763.

Touro Synagogue, the oldest synagogue in the country, celebrated its 250th anniversary in 2013. Festivities included the reading of a letter written to the synagogue’s original congregation by George Washington and a visit from Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Community Rallies to Restore 400-Year-Old St. Augustine Mission

Posted on: January 17th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

Earliest known photo of St. Augustine Mission, c. 1867. Credit: Bell, William A., courtesy Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), negative 012321
Earliest known photo of St. Augustine Mission, c. 1867.

As it approached its 400th year, St. Augustine Mission in the Pueblo of Isleta, 15 miles south of Albuquerque, N.M., was showing its age.

Built in 1613 by local masons and craftsmen, the adobe church, which for generations has been a place of worship and a community gathering space, as well as a popular tourist attraction, is one of the oldest and largest Spanish missions in New Mexico and a striking example of local Puebloan architecture.

“We’re very proud to have this church, with this significance in America’s history,” says Alan Cherino, a longtime member of the church.

When community members at the Pueblo of Isleta formed a restoration committee in 2004, Frank Lujan, then-governor of Isleta, had one demand: to make the mission, which had been well maintained throughout its life, look just as it did on the day restoration began.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.