Restoration

 


Hinchliffe Stadium’s Art Deco cast concrete construction has long suffered from neglect.

The 1933 Art Deco Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., is one of the few remaining stadiums in the country associated with Negro League Baseball, and the former home to some of the league’s greatest players and teams.

In connection with today’s community cleanup of Hinchliffe, coordinated by the National Trust, the city of Paterson, and the Hinchliffe Steering Committee, PreservationNation spoke with famed Negro League historian Dr. Larry Hogan about the significance of Hinchliffe Stadium and the legacy of Negro League Baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Baseball’s Hidden History

Posted on: April 15th, 2014 by Guest Writer 5 Comments

 

Written by Adrian Burgos, Jr., Professor, U.S. History, University of Illinois

Graffiti at Hinchliffe Stadium. Credit: DanielLugo, Flickr
Built in 1932, Hinchliffe Stadium is situated near Great Falls, a National Historic Landmark in Paterson, N.J.

Years before Jackie Robinson stepped across the white lines and onto Ebbets Field to make history as major league baseball's integration pioneer, decades before Roberto Clemente displayed his hitting prowess, graceful fielding, and powerful arm on North American baseball diamonds, and well before U.S. baseball fans became acquainted with the high-leg kick of Juan Marichal, the pitching gyrations of Luis Tiant, the prodigious home runs of Orlando Cepeda, other amazing performances of Big Papi David Ortiz, Pedro Martinez, and Manny Ramirez, black baseball fans congregated on Saturdays to watch the Negro League’s premier talent at Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J. -- a historic space where African-American and Latino fans watched some of their own perform during the era of segregated baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 


 Jennifer Carman, president of J. Carman, Inc., founded the Facebook page Stop the Demolitions, Little Rock in 2013, which seeks to explore constructive and viable alternatives to the destruction of neglected and abandoned structures.

As part of the CityLove Blog series, we wanted to highlight a local leader -- someone who is in the city, living the preservation-minded life. For this month’s city of Little Rock, we spoke with Jennifer Carman, the president of J. Carman, Inc., a fine art advisory and appraisal firm.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

Putting a Stamp on History at the Bronx General Post Office

Posted on: March 26th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

140325_blog_photo_PostOffice_3_NewYorkLandmarksConservancy
The United States Postal Service first proposed shuttering the post office, along with 16 other Bronx post offices, in 2012.

Thirteen colorful New Deal-era murals line the walls inside the Bronx General Post Office on the borough’s Grand Concourse. They stretch all the way to the 20-foot ceiling, towering over everyone who walks through the doors. Rendered in egg tempura on plaster by artist Ben Shahn and his wife Bernarda Bryson Shahn, the paintings embody the might of American labor and industry.

But until recently, the murals’ future, as well as that of the grand historic lobby that they occupy, was in doubt.

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Desegregation Landmark in New Orleans Again Offers Education — and Healing

Posted on: March 7th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

The William Frantz Elementary, now Akili Academy, in New Orleans' upper 9th Ward after restoration.
The William Frantz Elementary, now Akili Academy, in New Orleans' upper 9th Ward after restoration

On November 14, 1960, 6-year-old Ruby Bridges started her first day at the William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans’ Upper 9th Ward. As one of the first children to integrate public schools in the city, she was escorted to the building by federal marshals through throngs of hostile protestors.

“I remember turning onto the street. I saw barricades, and police officers, and just people everywhere,” Bridges recalled in a PBS documentary that aired in November. “When I saw all of that, I immediately thought that it was Mardi Gras. I had no idea that they were here to keep me out of the school."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.