Restoration

[10 on Tuesday] 10 Steps for Restoring Historic Theaters

Posted on: December 31st, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 9 Comments

 

PreservationNation blog readers love historic theaters with a capital LOVE, reading and liking and commenting in overdrive whenever we share a restoration or reuse story. And really, what’s not to love? Theaters evoke wonderful memories of experiencing art, enjoying architecture, and spending time with loved ones.

Plus, historic theaters are proven community revitalizers and economic drivers. Not only do they generate an impact of at least $2-$3 per dollar spent on tickets, but they also catalyze other business development, create jobs, and improve the local quality of life.

But restoring a historic theater is no small undertaking. In fact, the average historic theater project costs between $5 and $30 million, opens in 5 to 10 years from inception, and requires dozens of consultants. In this toolkit, we share the essential steps in bringing a historic theater back to life so it can be the site of many more happy memories to come.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

10 Preservation Wins in 2013

Posted on: December 30th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 9 Comments

 

For anyone worried that year '13 would prove unlucky for the beautiful places in our midst, take heart: Though we did lose some irreplaceable historic places this past year, we also celebrated a remarkable number of preservation wins throughout the country. Let's look back at some of 2013's biggest success stories and get inspired for the year ahead!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

One Community's Creative Solution to Restoring Historic Windows

Posted on: December 20th, 2013 by Scott Austin Sidler 4 Comments

 

Scott Sidler teaches a volunteer how to finish glaze windows. Credit: Steve Quillian
Scott Sidler teaches a volunteer how to finish glaze windows.

Last month a unique event took place in the piney woods of central Florida: A group of Florida’s leading preservationists came together to try a new way to save one of the state’s historic landmarks.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Scott Austin Sidler

Scott Austin Sidler

Scott Austin Sidler is the owner of Austin Home Restorations in Central Florida, and spends his time blogging about all things preservation, salvage, and historic on his blog, The Craftsman.

Step by Step: Update on the Philadelphia Uptown Theatre Restoration

Posted on: November 27th, 2013 by Meghan Drueding

 

At the time of its opening in 1929, the Uptown’s grand auditorium dazzled moviegoers. Credit: Glazer Collection, Athenaeum of Philadelphia
At the time of its opening in 1929, the Uptown’s grand auditorium dazzled moviegoers.

Philadelphia's Uptown Theatre (covered in Preservation's Summer 2012 issue) once hosted shows by some of the biggest names in music, such as Stevie Wonder, James Brown, and The Jackson 5. Designed by prominent local architect Louis Magaziner, the 1927 Art Deco building originally served as a glamorous movie venue. During the 1950s and '60s, it evolved into a prestigious tour stop for African-American entertainers.

By the 1990’s, though, the Uptown had fallen on hard times. When community organizer Linda Richardson formed the Uptown Entertainment and Development Corporation (UEDC) in 1995, the abandoned theater in North Philadelphia suffered from a leaky roof, a vandalized interior, and a shabby exterior. The UEDC began raising funds for its restoration, and was eventually able to purchase the building in 2004.

The organization has completed a series of stabilization and preservation projects, such as the restoration of the terracotta tiles on the facade by local tile artist Karen Singer. (It still needs to raise the money to actually install the tiles.) And the UEDC will soon unveil a $1.3 million renovation of a six-story office tower that is part of the original building.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Saving Colonel Charles Young's Historic Birthplace in Mays Lick, Ky.

Posted on: November 22nd, 2013 by Katherine Flynn

 

Colonel Charles Young was born in this cabin in May’s Lick, Ky., in 1864. Credit: Bill Macintire, Kentucky Heritage Council

The cabin doesn’t look like much. Tucked into a stand of trees and covered in vines, its log walls and stone chimney slightly off-kilter, the neglected building has sat empty for years. But its humble appearance belies a big slice of history: In 1864 it served as the birthplace of Charles Young, an African-American colonel who fought discrimination to build a remarkable military career.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.