Restoration

 

Credit: Elizabeth Gill Lui
What is now the Tangier American Legation in Morocco played a key role in the Allied invasion of North Africa during World War II.

If you had to guess, you’d probably think the first American-owned government property outside of our borders was in France, or Canada, or maybe even Japan. But you’d be way off. In fact, you wouldn’t even be on the right continent.

The longest tenured American-owned property on foreign soil is in Africa -- Tangier, Morocco, to be exact. It’s the only National Historic Landmark on foreign soil and has served as a symbol of American engagement with the Islamic world and North Africa since the early days of the republic.

Morocco was the first country to recognize American statehood (in June of 1786). What is now known as the Tangier American Legation in Morocco (TALIM) was gifted to the American government by Sultan Moulay Suleiman in 1821. Since then, it’s acquired quite a bit of history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Why More People Should Know About Tacoma, Washington (And Not Just from 10 Things I Hate About You)

Posted on: May 27th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Sara Stiltner, Senior Project Manager, Preservation Green Lab

Credit: Sara Stiltner/National Trust for Historic Preservation
Old City Hall, which was built 1882, was the first building to be added to the Tacoma Register of Historic Places. 

Thanks to Tacoma’s Old City Hall, I finally got someone to laugh at my favorite joke, the only joke I’ve bothered to memorize.

The first time my husband Ryan visited Tacoma, Wash., we meandered through my hometown’s historic district. I showed off my favorite spots, rattling off both the histories and my memories of various buildings. Inspiration struck when we passed Old City Hall’s clock tower.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House: Music to a Preservationist’s Ears

Posted on: May 19th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Jackson Rooming House, exterior. Credit: Bracken Engineering
Outside the Jackson Rooming House

Though there’s no clear record for when exactly it was built, Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House started off as a typical single-family home in the 1890s. It wasn’t until between 1901 and 1905 that it received its addition and became the one of the city’s few rooming houses that catered to African-Americans during the era of segregation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Credit: Roberta Lane, Instagram

“The world’s favorite season is the spring. All things seem possible in May.” -- Edwin Way Teale, American naturalist and writer

It’s May, and the historic Untermyer Gardens of Yonkers, N.Y., are in bloom. We all know that gardens mean hope. Creating a place where natural beauty can be sown and nurtured and enjoyed is an ambitious, humanitarian act. Therefore, a restored historic garden represents hope renewed.

My trip to Yonkers confirmed it -- there is no better way to recharge than to try to capture some of the stories and scenes in a historic garden.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Roberta Lane

Roberta Lane

Roberta Lane is the Senior Field Officer and Attorney for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s New York City Field Office. She has been with the National Trust since 2006, delivering preservation technical assistance and legal guidance in the field.

 


The "Tent of Tomorrow" was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Fifty years ago today, the world flocked to Queens, New York, for a glimpse of utopia.

Adults paid $2 for admission to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, and what they got in return was the next best thing to an actual trip to the moon. Scattered throughout a 646-acre urban oasis were 150 fancifully designed pavilions showcasing inventions that promised to boundlessly transform life and how it was lived. There were lasers, mainframe computers, ten-story tall rockets, touch tone telephones, microwave meals, color televisions -- even a dishwasher that melted washed and dried plastic dinnerware into new cups, plates, and saucers.

The future was here, and everyone was a Jetson.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.