Restoration

Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House: Music to a Preservationist’s Ears

Posted on: May 19th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

Jackson Rooming House, exterior. Credit: Bracken Engineering
Outside the Jackson Rooming House

Though there’s no clear record for when exactly it was built, Tampa’s Jackson Rooming House started off as a typical single-family home in the 1890s. It wasn’t until between 1901 and 1905 that it received its addition and became the one of the city’s few rooming houses that catered to African-Americans during the era of segregation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

Credit: Roberta Lane, Instagram

“The world’s favorite season is the spring. All things seem possible in May.” -- Edwin Way Teale, American naturalist and writer

It’s May, and the historic Untermyer Gardens of Yonkers, N.Y., are in bloom. We all know that gardens mean hope. Creating a place where natural beauty can be sown and nurtured and enjoyed is an ambitious, humanitarian act. Therefore, a restored historic garden represents hope renewed.

My trip to Yonkers confirmed it -- there is no better way to recharge than to try to capture some of the stories and scenes in a historic garden.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Roberta Lane

Roberta Lane

Roberta Lane is the Senior Field Officer and Attorney for the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s New York City Field Office. She has been with the National Trust since 2006, delivering preservation technical assistance and legal guidance in the field.

 


The "Tent of Tomorrow" was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Fifty years ago today, the world flocked to Queens, New York, for a glimpse of utopia.

Adults paid $2 for admission to Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, and what they got in return was the next best thing to an actual trip to the moon. Scattered throughout a 646-acre urban oasis were 150 fancifully designed pavilions showcasing inventions that promised to boundlessly transform life and how it was lived. There were lasers, mainframe computers, ten-story tall rockets, touch tone telephones, microwave meals, color televisions -- even a dishwasher that melted washed and dried plastic dinnerware into new cups, plates, and saucers.

The future was here, and everyone was a Jetson.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

 


Hinchliffe Stadium’s Art Deco cast concrete construction has long suffered from neglect.

The 1933 Art Deco Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J., is one of the few remaining stadiums in the country associated with Negro League Baseball, and the former home to some of the league’s greatest players and teams.

In connection with today’s community cleanup of Hinchliffe, coordinated by the National Trust, the city of Paterson, and the Hinchliffe Steering Committee, PreservationNation spoke with famed Negro League historian Dr. Larry Hogan about the significance of Hinchliffe Stadium and the legacy of Negro League Baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Hinchliffe Stadium Reveals Baseball’s Hidden History

Posted on: April 15th, 2014 by Guest Writer 5 Comments

 

Written by Adrian Burgos, Jr., Professor, U.S. History, University of Illinois

Graffiti at Hinchliffe Stadium. Credit: DanielLugo, Flickr
Built in 1932, Hinchliffe Stadium is situated near Great Falls, a National Historic Landmark in Paterson, N.J.

Years before Jackie Robinson stepped across the white lines and onto Ebbets Field to make history as major league baseball's integration pioneer, decades before Roberto Clemente displayed his hitting prowess, graceful fielding, and powerful arm on North American baseball diamonds, and well before U.S. baseball fans became acquainted with the high-leg kick of Juan Marichal, the pitching gyrations of Luis Tiant, the prodigious home runs of Orlando Cepeda, other amazing performances of Big Papi David Ortiz, Pedro Martinez, and Manny Ramirez, black baseball fans congregated on Saturdays to watch the Negro League’s premier talent at Hinchliffe Stadium in Paterson, N.J. -- a historic space where African-American and Latino fans watched some of their own perform during the era of segregated baseball.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.