Restoration

First HOPE Crew Project Revitalizes 75-Year-Old Stable

Posted on: June 17th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 3 Comments

 

Credit: Susana Raab
Members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia helped rehabilitate the Skyland Stable, built in 1939, at Shenandoah National Park earlier this year as part of the National Trust's HOPE Crew initiative.

When a crew of young members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia arrived at Shenandoah National Park’s Skyland Stable back in March, they knew plenty about construction, but not much about historic preservation.

Less than three months later, however, the once-dilapidated stable looked much as it did when it was built in 1939, thanks to the young corpsmembers who trained alongside preservation professionals to conduct a large-scale rehabilitation of the property.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

Credit: J. J. Lamb, Vail Preservation Society
Students in Cienega High School’s construction technology course learn preservation trade skills at the 1915 section foreman house.

It’s the sound of a train whistle -- not a school bell -- that will alert students to the end of the school day at Esmond Station K-8 in Vail, Ariz. With details like that, the new railroad-themed school, set to be completed this summer, is taking its design cues from the town’s rich railroad history.

But the biggest nod to history lies in the 1915 railroad foreman’s house on the campus. And that foreman’s house, in merging the old with the new, has sparked a partnership between the Vail School District and the Vail Preservation Society, which have worked together to create a hands-on learning laboratory for students throughout the district.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Instagram Tour] Behind the Scenes at Union Station

Posted on: June 3rd, 2014 by Grant Stevens 4 Comments

 

Credit: brilliantartistry, Instagram
The top of the main hall | Fun Fact: Saint Gaudens designed these statues without shields. The railroad owners felt that the bare-legged statues might offend the ladies. As a way to get back at the resistance, the sculptor decided to give the statues a little extra. There are some interesting surprises behind some of these shields. -- @brilliantartistry, Jarrett Hendrix

While waiting in the Washington, D.C., Union Station Main Hall, many visitors look up to admire the beautiful barrel-vaulted ceilings currently undergoing restoration or the statues of Roman legionnaires that look down from stories above. Rarely, however, do you see people looking back at you.

Saturday, May 31 was an exception. In partnership with the Union Station Redevelopment Corporation (USRC), the National Trust led four behind-the-scenes tours of Union Station, taking photographers and Instagrammers to spaces rarely open to the public.

We’ve compiled some of our favorite photos from the day, as well as information about each of the stops. You can find more photos on Instagram or Twitter by searching #unionstationtour. Be sure to follow @SavingPlaces too!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

Preservation in Progress: Main Street Revitalizes Conrad, Iowa

Posted on: May 29th, 2014 by Grant Stevens

 

Credit: Conrad Chamber, MainStreet
The Record building in Conrad, Iowa, seen before its renovation in winter 2013

Though I now live in Washington, D.C., my home will always be Conrad, Iowa -- population 1,108 and Black Dirt Capital of the World. Conrad was actually how I first heard about the National Main Street Center, which is now a subsidiary of the National Trust. My town boasted one of Main Street Iowa’s original Rural Main Streets (populations less than 5,000) and I have fond memories of when my mom had a business in Conrad and was involved with Main Street.

Each time I go home, I notice small differences, but when I was home during Christmas this past year, major changes were underway. As Darla Ubben, the Conrad Chamber-Main Street Program Director, explains in this more in-depth Preservation Leadership Forum blog post, Conrad received a $500,000 Community Development Block Grant to carry out a facade improvement program on 22 storefronts and four rear facades.

I snapped some photos last winter while work was underway, and convinced my younger brother Clark to get some as well in early May when the work was nearly complete. I hope you enjoy seeing some of these great preservation-in-progress photos!

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens

Grant is the Manager of Community Outreach at the National Trust. He's proud to be from a Main Street Community and the Black Dirt Capitol of the World – Conrad, Iowa! Growing up on a farm, he always loved going to town and looking at the historic buildings. Now a resident of DC, Grant enjoys reading, running, and anything rural.

Artist’s Retreat Chesterwood Completes an Artful Restoration

Posted on: May 28th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Ashley R. Wilson, AIA, ASID, Graham Gund Architect

Credit: Ashley Wilson/National Trust for Historic Preservation
The studio in 2012, before the restoration, which shows extensive cracking.

There was a distinctive Berkshires art vibe at the opening party of Chesterwood, the newly restored studio and summer estate of American Renaissance sculptor Daniel Chester French in Stockbridge, Mass. The gardens were vibrant, the mountains were streaked with fog and sunlight, and the nymph-like dancers from Berkshire Pulse emerged from the forest to open the studio doors after nearly two years of restoration.

Built in 1896, Chesterwood, a Historic Site of the National Trust, was in dire need of help. After 115 years, the interior of the studio needed only limited repairs, but the exterior of the building was both aesthetically displeasing and structurally unsound.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.