Restoration

 

If you’ve had a chance to check out Preservation magazine’s Fall issue cover story, you know that most of the damage incurred at the Washington National Cathedral during the August 2011 earthquake was to the high stone pinnacles and towers.

Though I'm not afraid of much, I am definitely afraid of heights. But in spite of that, when I was offered the opportunity to take a look at the damage -- and the preservation progress -- up close, my immediate answer was, “I’m in.”

It was cool to go behind (above?) the scenes and see how much progress has been made since we last visited in April. Here is a photo gallery of my favorite details and views from my most recent visit:

To learn more about the preservation and restoration work ongoing at the Washington National Cathedral, or to donate to help with repair and preservation expenses, visit SavingPlaces.org.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman is editor in chief of Preservation magazine. He’s lived all over the United States but currently resides in Baltimore where he is restoring a 1918 center hall Colonial.

[Slideshow] Restoration Diary: Ch-ch-ch-Changes Inside & Out

Posted on: September 28th, 2012 by David Garber

 

After hearing word the other day that the scaffolding was down at Lionel Lofts, I popped over to check out the recent progress -- which turned out to be pretty dramatic. Not only is the 3-story scaffold down, but the interior has been fitted out with -- wait for it -- floors and walls! It's. All. Starting. To. Come. Together!

Check it out:

 
More information on this development project can be found on the Lionel Lofts website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

[Slideshow] Restoration Diary: Work Begins on the Historic Facade

Posted on: August 20th, 2012 by David Garber

 

We've been covering the adaptive reuse of the c. 1905 Lionel Lofts building on DC's fast-changing 14th Street NW for about eight months now. And up to this point, most of the construction work has taken place inside the building -- which, aside for a few original brick walls, isn't seeing a lot of restoration. But with the sidewalk scaffolding now in place in front of the building, some actual restoration is finally happening!

Take a look at our slideshow of recent progress below. Not only is the exterior finally moving forward, the interior is also starting to look a little different thanks to brickwork, new steel framing, and installed floor joists.

 
More information on this development project can be found on the Lionel Lofts website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Restoration Diary: Joists and Belgian Waffles

Posted on: June 5th, 2012 by David Garber 1 Comment

 

The big news at Lionel Lofts over the past month -- during which time not a lot of *visual* progress has been made, save for the new foundation wall in the back of the building -- is that the retail space has been leased to "B Too," a new concept from Belgian chef Bart Vandaele, who has built a following at the Capitol Hill neighborhood's popular brunch spot Belga Café.

 
Even cooler is the news that all of the building's original joists will be reused inside the restaurant. The boards will be taken offsite to be cleaned and treated, but will retain a rustic looks inside the new space.

The Washington Post revealed some exciting details on the restaurant space last month:

The ground floor of the 150-seat restaurant, a former locksmith shop, will feature a waffle bar and breakfast by day and frites served through a window at night. To access the private dining room in the basement of B Too, diners will descend on a glass stairway that will make visible the contents of the wine and beer cellar. Open kitchens will distinguish both floors.

Guess we still have a few Restoration Diary posts to go before this great building adaptation is complete...

More information on this development project can be found on the Lionel Lofts website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Restoration Diary: Underpinning the Foundation Walls

Posted on: April 24th, 2012 by David Garber 1 Comment

 

Although things don't *look* all that different inside the future Lionel Lofts building on DC's 14th Street, NW, there's been a fair amount of important progress expanding the basement to the back of the building and underpinning (extending and strengthening) the foundation.

As you can see in the photos below, underpinning is dirty work -- but doing this the right way will ensure that the restored and adapted building will stay standing for as long as it's used and treasured.


More information on this development project can be found on the Lionel Lofts website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.