Restoration

 

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Left: Gary Martinez of Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Right: The marquee and facade of the restored Saenger Theatre in New Orleans.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we take a peek behind the curtain at the newly renovated Kings Theatre in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Seized during the 1970s in lieu of back taxes, the historic venue idled vacant until the New York City Economic Development Corporation issued a Request for Proposals to restore it in 2008.

A consortium of groups participated in the project, spearheaded by ACE Theatrical Group and Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Below are excerpts from our wide-ranging conversation with Gary Martinez, president and principal at Martinez+Johnson. [The interview has been edited for length and clarity.]... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

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Last week the Trust for the National Mall announced a project to rehabilitate the Constitution Gardens. Pictured: a model of phase one of the rehabilitation design.

What is the nation’s most visited National Park? Yosemite? Yellowstone? The Grand Canyon? Nope. If you guessed the National Mall, you’d be right. Though it gets a whopping 29 million visitors a year, many Americans don’t actually realize that it’s part of the park service.

National Mall locations such as the Washington Monument have become symbolic of the United States, but lesser known Mall sites like Constitution Gardens, for example, are literally hiding in plain sight. The nonprofit Trust for the National Mall (TNM), in partnership with the National Park Service (NPS), however, is trying to change that.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman is editor in chief of Preservation magazine. He’s lived all over the United States but currently resides in Baltimore where he is restoring a 1918 center hall Colonial.

The Restoration of Al Capone’s Miami Beach Mansion

Posted on: April 28th, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

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The two-story pool cabana is on the edge of Biscayne Bay. A spiral staircase leads to the top floor which comprises two, mirror-image large rooms -- one bedroom and one full bathroom.

Prohibition is dead, gone, and if this blog is any indication, ain't coming back (thank God). But the former home of Al Capone, the Prohibition era’s most notorious bootlegger, was recently resurrected.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

By Tyler Anthony Smith

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The "Two Sisters" houses were home to African-American ship caulkers between 1842-1854.

Have you ever noticed two small, 218-year-old, wood-sided houses on South Wolfe Street in Baltimore’s Fell’s Point? The Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fell’s Point owns these buildings, often referred to as the “Two Sisters,” which likely date to 1797 -- the same year that the U.S. Frigate Constellation was built in a Fell’s Point ship yard.

Originally part of a building with four identical units, the remaining "Two Sisters" each stand just twelve feet wide and fifteen feet deep, with a single room on the first floor and a half story garret above. The buildings housed many working Baltimore residents, including African-American ship caulkers Richard Jones, Henry Scott, and John Whittington from 1842 to 1854. As ship caulkers they are associated with a unique Baltimore story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Celebrating National Library Week 2015, Preservation-Style

Posted on: April 13th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 1 Comment

 

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National Library Week is April 12-18, 2015.

In honor of National Library Week (which runs from April 12-18 and is sponsored by the American Library Association), the National Trust is using a preservation perspective to spotlight three historic buildings that have been repurposed into a bookworm’s paradise. These three libraries are an excellent example of National Library Week 2015's theme: "unlimited possibilities." So, prepare yourselves, bibliophiles, for an impromptu road trip!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Wilshire Boulevard Temple: Restoring a 1929 Landmark

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

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The restored and renovated Wilshire Boulevard Temple in Los Angeles was on display in the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine. Dedicated in 1929 and named a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973, the temple had never undergone a major restoration until recently. Here, we take you on a deeper look inside this iconic house of worship.


Wilshire Boulevard Temple by National Trust for Historic Preservation on Exposure

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.