Restoration

[11 Most Endangered] Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Posted on: July 8th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: David Casteel
Mokuaikaua Church was built in 1837 by Hawaii's first Christian missionaries. 

The ohia wood rafters in the sanctuary of the Mokauikaua Church in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, have been sheltering worshipers since 1837, when King Kamehameha II gave Hawaii's first Christian missionaries his blessing to build the structure just a stone's throw from the ocean.

Mokauikaua -- 177 years later -- has become immeasurably valuable in not only giving residents of Kailua-Kona on Hawaii’s Big Island a beautiful place to meet and worship, but also in helping to tell the state’s unique story. Pastor David de Carvalho, the 31st to serve at the church, estimates that it welcomes about 400 people every Sunday, an even split of regulars and tourists eager to experience a service in the Aloha State's oldest house of worship.

That’s why, in light of structural damage from a 6.6 magnitude earthquake in 2006 and a slew of problems due to typical wear-and-tear in Hawaii's tropical climate, the National Trust decided to grant the church a place on its 2014 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

Uptop, Colorado: A Ghost Town With a Beating Heart

Posted on: July 7th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 1 Comment

 

Credit: Larry Lamsa, Flickr
Uptop, Colorado, was settled in 1877, but remains a ghost town outside La Veta.

When you hear the term “ghost town,” you probably imagine a diminishing population, failing industries, and bleak economic fortunes. That’s why the story of Uptop, Colorado -- a 40-acre settlement, established in 1877, near the town of La Veta -- paves the way for a newer understanding of what it means to be a ghost town.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.

HOPE Crew: Training the Next Generation of Preservationists

Posted on: July 3rd, 2014 by Lauren Walser

 

140703_blog_photo_HOPECrew_Hinchliffe_1_DuncanKendall
A HOPE Crew in Paterson, New Jersey, paints Hinchliffe Stadium in April.

As any preservationist knows, the task of caring for and maintaining historic sites is a never-ending one. With that in mind, the National Trust for Historic Preservation recently launched a new program called Hands-On Preservation Experience (HOPE) Crew to introduce preservation to the next generation.

HOPE Crew will provide practical, hands-on preservation training to thousands of young people and veterans through a partnership with The Corps Network, a national advocacy and support group for youth development programs that has more than 100 youth corps members. (Read more about HOPE Crew and its partnership with The Corps Network in the Summer 2014 issue of Preservation magazine.)

Each HOPE Crew will partner with local preservation craftspeople and a preservation adviser who will provide mentorship and training. The corpsmembers receive hourly wages for their work; the professionals who provide their expertise on each project receive compensation, as well.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Building the Brew: Historic Preservation & Breweries in Cincinnati

Posted on: June 25th, 2014 by Guest Writer

 

Written by Daniel Ronan, Site Projects & Public Engagement Coordinator, National Public Housing Museum

Credit: Jack Martin
The pump station in 1894 for the adjacent Eden Park Reservoir

When I visited Cincinnati for the first time in March, I was amazed by the Queen City’s fervor for historic preservation. In particular, efforts to revitalize neighborhoods such as the Over-the-Rhine (OTR) -- one of the largest historic districts in the United States -- and the enthusiasm for local preservation enthusiasm encouraged me to look deeper into Cincy’s burgeoning cultural renaissance.

And what says culture more than a pint of beer?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

American World’s Fairs Icons that Have Stood the Test of Time

Posted on: June 20th, 2014 by Steven Piccione 6 Comments

 

Credit: Library of Congress, Wikimedia Commons
An aerial-view print of the 1901 Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, N.Y.

The World’s Fair is one of the longest-running international exhibitions, in which countries gather to showcase premier inventions -- from Belgian waffles and ice cream to X-ray machines and electrical current systems. Ever since the first World’s Fair in 1851, which took place in London, host countries have constructed the most fantastic buildings, each outdoing the previous host.

During the Paris Universal Exposition in 1889, France erected the Eiffel Tower. In return, Chicago unveiled the never-before-seen Ferris wheel during the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which drew a crowd equal to a third of the U.S. population at the time. However, most World’s Fair buildings are constructed to be temporary, torn down after the one-time event.

Fortunately, not all World’s Fair buildings are demolished, and some even become the most iconic symbol of a city: Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, the New York State Pavilion, and certainly the Eiffel Tower. The upcoming World’s Fair will take place in Milan next year, but let’s take a look at some of the most iconic buildings that were built for the World’s Fair that have stood the test of time here in the United States.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione

Steven Piccione is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. He enjoys carbonated water, all things British, and living in a city warmer than Chicago. Follow him on Instagram at @stebbsjp.