Restoration

 

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This 1998 statue, by Ted Aub, depicts the first meeting in 1851 between famed suffragettes, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, (who were introduced by activist Amelia Bloomer, depicted in the center).

Can you name 20 American historical figures that are women, excluding famous athletes, celebrities, and First Ladies? Most college students cannot, which isn’t surprising given that less than 5% of the content of history textbooks refers to women. On top of that, only 8% of sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places embody underrepresented communities, including women.

The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York aims to change that.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O’Connor is the member services assistant at the National Trust. She enjoys learning, writing, and talking about museums, art, architecture, and anything historic.

Life in a Converted Firehouse

Posted on: March 10th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding

 

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Inside David Braly and Mark Montoya's converted firehouse home

Everyone likes the idea of living in a converted something-or-other. An old barn, an industrial loft, a former schoolhouse: With a lot of TLC, all of these building types have the potential to become comfortable, appealing residences.

In Montgomery, Alabama, David Braly and Mark Montoya were up to this task. They lavished attention on a neglected firehouse, turning it into a lovely (and quirky) home that honors both past and present. Photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daley have documented the Braly-Montoya residence in the images that appear in the upcoming Spring issue of Preservation magazine, as well as in the video shown here. Enjoy!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

[Historic Bars] Duluth, Minnesota’s Tycoons Alehouse & Eatery

Posted on: January 30th, 2015 by David Weible 2 Comments

 

What's more fun than a historic bar? A historic bar with a theme! And that's exactly what we're featuring in our next installment of historic bars -- establishments with kitschy, unusual, and unique calling cards. Next up: Duluth's Tycoons Alehouse & Eatery.


Tycoon's Alehouse sits in the fully restored 1889 Duluth City Hall.

While its collection of trout streams, mountain bike trails, and ski hills -- not to mention one of the largest bodies of fresh water on the globe -- have made Duluth, Minnesota an outdoorsman's utopia, the city of some 80,000 isn't lacking in history either.

Take its 1889 city hall. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Behind the Scenes: Cannon House Office Building Renewal

Posted on: January 26th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

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The Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C. is undergoing a ten-year restoration.

Preservation was recently invited by the Architect of the Capitol (AOC) to the Cannon Renewal Project press briefing to see the current condition of the oldest Congressional office and hear more about the ten-year plan underway to restore and preserve it.  On hand to discuss the renewal project were Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers; Superintendent of House Office Buildings William Weidemeyer; and Historian of the U.S. House of Representatives Matthew A. Wasniewski.

Built in 1908, the Beaux-Arts style Cannon House Office Building (known on Capitol Hill by its acronym, "CHOB" or simply “Cannon”) was designed by prominent New York-based architecture firm Carrère and Hastings. Located just one block south of the U.S. Capitol, Cannon is home to the offices of 142 U.S. Representatives across five floors, and includes four committee hearing rooms, the historic Caucus Room, and the Rotunda.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

Mad River Glen’s Single-Chair Lift: Restoring an Icon

Posted on: December 30th, 2014 by Lauren Walser

 

Left: Crews remove the aging towers from their concrete bases. Right: The single-chair lift takes one skier per chair on a 12-minute ride to the top of General Stark Mountain.
Left: Crews remove the aging towers from their concrete bases. Right: The single-chair lift takes one skier per chair on a 12-minute ride to the top of General Stark Mountain.

Mad River Glen ski area in Vermont’s Green Mountain Range isn’t like most ski areas. As you’ll read in the Winter 2015 issue of Preservation, it tends to buck the trends: It rarely uses manmade snow, it does minimal grooming of its trails, it forbids snowboarding, and it’s owned by its skiers, who formed the Mad River Glen Cooperative in 1995.

In fact, Mad River Glen today looks much the way it did when it celebrated its grand opening 66 years ago.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Retro Roadmap] The Roxy Theatre – Northampton, Pennsylvania

Posted on: December 12th, 2014 by Beth Lennon

 

The only single screen movie house for miles, patrons line up below the glow of the Roxy’s marquee.
The only single screen movie house for miles, patrons line up below the glow of the Roxy’s marquee.

At the beginning of the 20th century, before the advent of TV and way before the Internet, it was common for many small towns to have more than one theater offering a variety of entertainment. Fast forward to today at the beginning of the 21st century, and finding any downtown theater is a rarity.

Even more rare is to find a place like the Roxy Theatre. Located in the small town of Northampton, Pennsylvania, the Roxy is a lovingly restored Art Deco movie house and live venue, complete with working pipe organ and dazzling marquee.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.