Restoration

 

The Spud Drive-In. Photo courtesy jpc.raleigh, Flickr.
The Spud Drive-In

Anyone who owns -- or has tried to buy -- a camera any time in the past 10 years knows that digital photography has replaced film almost entirely. This transformation has not been limited to still pictures; digital is now king at the movies, too, which has created challenges at many older movie theaters.

The Spud Drive-In in Driggs, Idaho, is no exception. The theater, which opened in 1953 (and celebrates its 60th birthday this week) has long been a beloved part of the community, but has faced closure twice in recent years -- first from management changes, and then from the transition to digital projection.

Local fans rallied with Facebook outreach that reached thousands, and to date enough "Save the Spud" t-shirts have been sold to cover half the cost of a new digital projector. (They're still available -- get 'em while they're hot!)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

 

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Shankweiler's in Orefield, Pennsylvania is the oldest drive-in theatre in the country.

It was only supposed to be a temporary gig. Paul Geissinger, a recent high school graduate, agreed to run the projection booth at Shankweiler’s Drive-in Theatre in Orefield, Pa., for just a couple weeks until the theater’s new owner could find a permanent employee.

Forty-two years later, Geissinger is still there -- except now, he owns the place.

“I remember, I told [the owner] no, I’m not interested in working at a drive-in,” says Geissinger, who, at the time, was enrolled in electronics school. “But I said, fine, I’ll give you two weekends while you find someone else. But after two weeks, he couldn’t find anyone, so I gave him three weeks. Then another week. And I’m still there.”

This April, Geissinger opened up the beloved Shankweiler’s Drive-in Theatre, the oldest drive-in theater in the country, for its 80th season.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

No School Left Behind: Saving Montana's Rural Classrooms

Posted on: June 24th, 2013 by Aria Danaparamita

 

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The little school on the prairie. Rural schoolhouses, like this one in western Montana, may soon exist only in fiction.

Sandy Hart’s grandmother rode her horse to school. Out in rural Montana, wooden bell towers ring in the school day as the stars and stripes flutter atop lone flagpoles.

Tucked among mountains and prairies, these schoolhouses only have one or two classrooms. Yet steeped in the state’s homestead history, the rough hewn logs, clapboard, or cobblestone walls, are -- or were once -- a beacon for learning and community life.

Montana abounds with these one-and-two room schools built to educate children in the countryside. But these schools are getting, literally, left behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita

Aria Danaparamita, or Mita, is a contributor to the PreservationNation blog and recent graduate of Wesleyan University. She enjoys walks, coffee, and short stories. Follow her odd adventures on Twitter at @mitatweets.

Ellinwood's Historic Wolf Hotel: Giving Hope to a Hometown

Posted on: June 21st, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Chris McCord and business partner Kelli Penner are hoping to turn the National Register-listed Wolf Hotel into a bed and breakfast. Credit: Kelli Penner
Owner Chris McCord and business partner Kelli Penner are hoping to turn the National Register-listed Wolf Hotel into a bed-and-breakfast.

In 117 years, the Italianate-style Wolf Hotel in sleepy Ellinwood, Kan. has had only four owners. The newest, 26-year-old Chris McCord, is still in awe of his new responsibility.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an editorial assistant at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Slideshow] Cincinnati's Workers Murals: Historic Treasures on the Move

Posted on: June 8th, 2013 by David Robert Weible

 

Winold Reiss traveled to local Cincinnati industries and businesses in search of scenes to capture in his murals. Pictured here is a scene from American Laundry Machinery Inc., which at the time, was the world’s largest producer of industrial laundry equipment. This mural is one of the nine that will have to be moved.
Winold Reiss traveled to local Cincinnati industries and businesses in search of scenes to capture in his murals. Pictured here is a scene from American Laundry Machinery Inc., which at the time, was the world’s largest producer of industrial laundry equipment. This mural is one of the nine that will have to be moved.

They've done it before. The question is whether they can do it again.

With the completion of Cincinnati’s new Art Deco Union Terminal in 1933, officials commissioned over 18,000 square feet of art for its walls meant to transform the city’s image from one to be avoided on cross-country train travel, to a desired stopover. The largest portion of that space went to Winold Reiss, who set about depicting the industrial prowess of the Cincinnati area with 23 glass mosaic tile murals.

But after train service ceased at Union Terminal in 1972, and with the impending demolition of the concourse, 14 of the murals depicting specific scenes from local industries and businesses like Procter & Gamble, ended up being the ones on the move.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.