Restoration

The Denmark Presbyterian Church: A Corner of Tennessee History

Posted on: November 7th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 6 Comments

 

The exterior of the church after restoration was completed. Credit: Big Black Creek Historical Association
The exterior of the Denmark Presbyterian Church after restoration was completed.

With a current population of seven (yes, just seven), you’d think there wouldn’t be much to the town of Denmark in west Tennessee. But the little crossroads just 70-odd miles northeast of Memphis is a place with some oversized history.

Denmark is said to be the oldest Anglo town in West Tennessee, dating roughly to the 1818 treaty that Andrew Jackson signed for the land with the Chickasaw tribe. And contrary to the belief of the 40 or so Danish nationals that visit the town each year, the name is believed to come from the Chickasaw term for their hunting ground.

Most of the area was settled on land grants during the 1820s at three cents an acre. An estimated 50 to 60 percent of those grants remain in the families of their original owners. The town was the largest in the region until the railroads boosted neighbors like the city of Jackson.

And today, the little town’s crown jewel is the Denmark Presbyterian Church.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

A Prized Restoration: Saving Cincinnati's Pulitzer/Rauh House

Posted on: November 6th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

This International Style house was built in 1938 by Cincinnati architect John Becker for prominent insurance agent Frederick Rauh and his family. Credit: Jeffrey Jakucyk - Architects Plus
This International Style house was built in 1938 by Cincinnati architect John Becker for prominent insurance agent Frederick Rauh and his family.

In the March/April 2012 issue of Preservation magazine, we featured the inspiring story of Cincinnati’s 1938 Pulitzer House, a once-grand International Style home that was slated for demolition after suffering decades of neglect. Emily Rauh Pulitzer, the co-founder of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts with her late husband, former St. Louis Post-Dispatch editor Joseph Pulitzer Jr., purchased the house in 2011 after she was contacted by local preservationists trying to save the structure.

Rauh Pulitzer grew up in the home, which was commissioned by her father. After paying to stabilize the historic house, the 79-year-old philanthropist donated it to the Cincinnati Preservation Association, along with the funds needed to complete a thorough, historically accurate restoration. It now looks almost exactly the way it did when she was a girl, with the added bonus of modern amenities like insulated glass windows and up-to-date electric and plumbing systems.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

A photograph of the diary’s author, A.N. See. Credit: President Lincoln's Cottage
A photograph of the diary’s author, A.N. See.

From the outside, it doesn’t look like much -- just a tattered, oversized volume with a simple cloth spine. But the 1864 diary of Albert Nelson See, a U.S. Army soldier and member of Abraham Lincoln’s Presidential Guard, contains a rare, up-close perspective on a pivotal time in U.S. history.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

Tenants in the Rice Mill Lofts are prohibited from altering the building’s original graffiti. Credit: Studio WTA Architects
Tenants in the Rice Mill Lofts are prohibited from altering the building’s original graffiti.

If you’ve ever longed to make your home in a century-old industrial rice mill amid preserved graffiti and masonry brick walls, New Orleans’ Rice Mill Lofts might be the perfect place for you.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

A Young Crew Puts a Restoration on Ice in Lake Superior

Posted on: October 25th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

From left to right: Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa members Nick Cox, Nai Yang, Christina Schaufler, Emily Miller, and Isac Kautto in front of the West Bay Lodge. Credit: The Corps Network
Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa members Nick Cox, Nai Yang, Christina Schaufler, Emily Miller, and Isac Kautto in front of the West Bay Lodge.

When Midwestern architect Charles Buechner designed West Bay Lodge on remote Sand Island in 1912 as a vacation home, necessity dictated that he include an icehouse in his plans. The wooden structure, constructed right on the shore of Lake Superior, still stands as a relic of pre-refrigeration days. But decades of harsh winds and heavy snow took their toll.

“It was an original building, built along with the lodge,” explains Jeff Peters, whose family has cared for the property, located within the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore off the coast of northern Wisconsin, for the last 50 years. “It’s important to keep that story alive, and the way to tell that story is to have the icehouse still standing.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.