Restoration

[Retro Roadmap] The Roxy Theatre – Northampton, Pennsylvania

Posted on: December 12th, 2014 by Beth Lennon No Comments

 

The only single screen movie house for miles, patrons line up below the glow of the Roxy’s marquee.
The only single screen movie house for miles, patrons line up below the glow of the Roxy’s marquee.

At the beginning of the 20th century, before the advent of TV and way before the Internet, it was common for many small towns to have more than one theater offering a variety of entertainment. Fast forward to today at the beginning of the 21st century, and finding any downtown theater is a rarity.

Even more rare is to find a place like the Roxy Theatre. Located in the small town of Northampton, Pennsylvania, the Roxy is a lovingly restored Art Deco movie house and live venue, complete with working pipe organ and dazzling marquee.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Beth Lennon

Beth Lennon is the creator of the website RetroRoadmap.com. As "Mod Betty," she delights as the retro travel "hostess with the mostess," scouting out cool vintage places and sharing them with the world.

 

Before the house is restored it will be moved 32 feet further away from the busy intersection.
Before the house is restored, it will be moved 32 feet further away from the busy intersection.

A few years ago we featured a travel story in Preservation magazine about the C & O Canal and the restored lockhouses that can be reserved for overnight stays while hiking or biking along the canal tow path. So when I was invited to the unlocking of a related lockkeeper’s house that hasn’t been open to the public in more than 40 years, I jumped at the chance -- despite torrential rains.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman

Dennis Hockman is editor in chief of Preservation magazine. He’s lived all over the United States but currently resides in Baltimore where he is restoring a 1918 center hall Colonial.

Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre: 125 Years of Entertainment for All

Posted on: December 9th, 2014 by David Robert Weible

 

In total, the Auditorium Theatre held more than 4,000 seats. Adler designed the theatre’s acoustics to allow the seats farthest from the stage to hear each performance cleary.
In total, the Auditorium Theatre held more than 4,000 seats. Adler designed the theatre’s acoustics to allow the seats farthest from the stage to hear each performance clearly.

By 8:00 p.m. on May 4, 1886, Chicago’s Haymarket Square was bustling with as many as 3,000 people. They had gathered to support the city’s labor movement and hear its leaders speak.

The day before, policemen had killed union workers outside of the city’s McCormick Reaper Works as a crowd jeered the scabs who replaced them. Two days before that, tens of thousands had walked out on their jobs and paraded down Michigan Avenue, demonstrating for an eight-hour workday.

By 10:30 on the night of the 4th, the speeches in Haymarket were nearing their end. As the crowd thinned, nearly 200 policemen stormed the square. A dynamite bomb was thrown into their lines. The police responded with a confused volley through the spectators and their own ranks. Eight officers and an unknown number of bystanders were killed.

Before its completion in 1890, the Auditorium Theatre hosted the 1888 Republican National Convention. A massive tarp was drawn across the roofless building to accommodate the event.
Before its completion in 1890, the Auditorium Theatre hosted the 1888 Republican National Convention. A massive tarp was drawn across the roofless building to accommodate the event.

Just a small town in 1830, Chicago would grow into America’s second-largest city in 60 years. By 1850, half its residents had been born abroad. Those immigrants lucky enough to find jobs often worked long, dangerous hours in the city’s factories and mills. Many came home to squalid living conditions in the tenements of ethnic enclaves. Strikes and violence were commonplace.

Social and political division permeated the city. Even theater and entertainment were battlegrounds between the city’s capitalist, natural-born elite and its socialist working class. Workingmen’s orchestras, theater groups, and lectures were organized as politically motivated alternatives to their capitalist counterparts.

The brainchild of prominent Chicagoan Ferdinand Peck, the Auditorium Theatre was intended as an entertainment venue not only for the city’s elite, but for its working class masses.
The brainchild of prominent Chicagoan Ferdinand Peck, the Auditorium Theatre was intended as an entertainment venue not only for the city’s elite, but for its working class masses.

But from the smoldering social tension of the time, plans emerged for a building that would be the catalyst for Chicago’s ascension to one of world’s great cities. Just four weeks after the Haymarket Affair, Ferdinand Peck, one of the city’s richest and most prominent figures, announced his plans for Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

By Kristi Eaton

The home as it currently looks as it nears completion of the restoration work
The Tulsa home as it currently looks as restoration work nears completion.

Mark Sanders had been driving by and looking at the McGregor House in Tulsa, Oklahoma, for more than 20 years. Something about the lines, he says, always appealed to him. He’d also heard rumblings that Bruce Goff -- known for being the mastermind behind some of Tulsa’s most noteworthy buildings, including the Boston Avenue Methodist Church -- may have designed the home, but nobody ever had solid confirmation. So Sanders continued to drive by admiring the home’s design.

But all that changed in 2013, when a For Sale By Owner sign was placed in the front yard of the home.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Eighteenth-Century House Ruin to Be Restored…With Glass

Posted on: December 3rd, 2014 by Meghan O'Connor 26 Comments

 

The Menokin Foundation aims to rehabilitate Menokin, home of Declaration of Independence signer Francis Lightfoot Lee, using structural glass.
The Menokin Foundation aims to rehabilitate Menokin, home of Declaration of Independence signer Francis Lightfoot Lee, using structural glass.

What some people see when they look at Menokin is a collapsed house, an old ruin, a testament to the perils of ignoring preservation.  What the staff and Board at Menokin see, however, is a cutting-edge preservation opportunity.

The Menokin Foundation does not want to restore the house to its original condition. Instead, the Foundation believes Menokin is more valuable to the public in pieces. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O'Connor

Meghan O’Connor is the member services assistant at the National Trust. She enjoys learning, writing, and talking about museums, art, architecture, and anything historic.