Restoration

 

Written by Anya Grahn

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Single-wall structures can be found throughout the Pacific Northwest, West, and the South. Some communities, such as Park City, Utah, have found ingenious ways to restore these structures.

Chances are that if you live in a community that sprung up because of sawmills, railroads, oilfields, or even mining, your historic structure may be comprised of single-wall, plank wall, or box house construction.

Rapid population growth during times of economic boom required the immediate construction of buildings, and single-wall construction or “wood tents” allowed communities to meet mounting demands. These rudimentary wood structures were meant to provide temporary shelter; however, many have been successfully preserved and continue to be used today.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Tuberculosis Sanitariums: Reminders of the White Plague

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 5 Comments

 

Written by Anya Grahn

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Left: Consumptives playing in front of an open-air cottage at the Wisconsin State Sanitarium (circa 1940). Right: Mae Panzenhagen Strong in front of the Wisconsin State Sanitarium where she had been a patient (circa 1945).

For centuries, the white plague -- also known as tuberculosis (TB) or consumption -- was considered an ailment of the poor. The rich often escaped the embarrassment of the disease by retreating to European health spas, while the poor continued to suffer with no relief. As the Industrial Revolution brought more workers into crowded urban centers, the plague spread and no one was immune.

Bacteriologist Robert Koch’s germ theory in 1882 provided better insight into the disease, and lent itself to explaining the spread of tuberculosis. State and local anti-tuberculosis organizations led social movements to improve sanitary conditions through anti-spitting laws and health regulations; encouraged consumptives to seek medical treatment; and persuaded state and local governments to create a network of state and county hospitals that isolated consumptives.

These sanitariums mark the beginning of government-funded campaigns to address tuberculosis. At these sites, consumptives spent years seeking a cure through prescribed regimens of fresh air and sunlight. Located away from local urban populations, these self-sufficient medical complexes became isolated communities containing a series of buildings that provided housing for patients and staff, medical and administrative offices, utility plants, and other uses. While many of these structures have been lost, others have found new uses as housing developments, medical facilities, and even museums.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Fall Asleep in Class at Portland, Oregon’s Kennedy School

Posted on: July 29th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 2 Comments

 

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Kennedy School in northeast Portland, Oregon, was built in 1915.

Go ahead -- drink a beer or take a nap at northeast Portland, Oregon’s Kennedy Elementary School. We promise you won’t get detention.

Since its doors re-opened in 1997, Kennedy School, as it’s now called, has traded in reading, writing, and arithmetic for something a little different, thanks to its new owners, McMenamins. The popular Portland-based chain worked its magic on the long-vacant school, turning it into a combination hotel, restaurant, bar, brewery, theater, music venue, community garden, and community gathering space.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

[Video] A Project of Stewardship in Savannah

Posted on: July 14th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

By Elizabeth Byrd Wood, Senior Content Manager, Preservation Leadership Forum

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Giselle Rahn and her fiancé Matt in front of the Savannah house they are rehabbing.

Most stories about renovating an old house have to do with crumbling plaster and rotting sills. But when Giselle Rahn and her boyfriend took on the restoration of a 110-year-old house in Savannah, they soon recognized that they also faced complex issues involving social and economic status and racial disparity.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

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Shelby put her new masonry skills to use as a volunteer at the Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park this year.

Last year, right around this time, corpsmembers from the Michigan-based SEEDS Youth Conservation Corps were in the midst of rehabilitating the historic Goffar Barn at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, alongside Lake Michigan.

One corpsmember, Shelby, was not only able to learn while on the job, she was able to take the preservation masonry and repointing skills she had picked up at the Goffar Barn to volunteer her time, and expertise, to another nearby preservation project.

We caught up with Shelby, one year out from her training experience in HOPE Crew, and learned about her new opportunities, including a volunteer masonry project for the Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park in Traverse City, Michigan.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Tom Wall

Tom Wall is the Associate Manager of Community Outreach. His background includes television production, journalism, nonprofit communications, and marketing. Originally from Santa Fe, New Mexico, Tom is a graduate of the George Washington University, with a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication.

[Photos] Une Belle Maison: The Lombard Plantation House

Posted on: June 30th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

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Left: S. Frederick Starr in front of the fully-reconstructed kitchen house on his Lombard Plantation property. He was able to rebuild the kitchen house from scratch using 19th-century notarial drawings. Right: When Starr initially purchased the Lombard Plantation house, a cement-block biker bar called Sarge’s sat in the front yard. 

We’re excited to feature the story of the Lombard Plantation house -- one of the last 19th-century plantation houses still in existence inside New Orleans’ city limits -- in the 2015 Summer issue of Preservation magazine. We couldn’t fit all of the wonderful photos of the house inside our six-page spread, so to make sure they didn’t go to waste, we’re featuring a selection of outtakes by photographer Sara Essex Bradley here.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.