Reflections

A Love Letter to the Wilson County Courthouse

Posted on: February 28th, 2013 by Jason Clement

 

The Huffington Post is currently hosting The Love Letters Project, an anthology of reflections on American places by the local people that define them. Our very own Jason Lloyd Clement made the cut with this letter of love and admiration for the Wilson County Courthouse in Floresville, Texas. Reposted here for your enjoyment!

Jason Clement takes pictures at Wilson County Courthouse during the I Love Texas Courthouse campaign. Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation
Jason Clement takes pictures at Wilson County Courthouse during the I Love Texas Courthouses campaign.
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jason Clement

Jason Clement

Jason Lloyd Clement is the director of community outreach at the National Trust, which is really just a fancy way of saying he’s a professional place lover. For him, any day that involves a bike, a camera, and a gritty historic neighborhood is basically the best day ever.

High Tide for Modernism in Rehoboth Beach?

Posted on: February 26th, 2013 by Guest Writer 1 Comment

 

Written by Arnold Berke, Rehoboth homeowner and Contributing Editor at Preservation magazine

This article originally appeared in Letters from CAMP Rehoboth.

Modernism style in North Shores, Rehobeth Beach. Credit: Arnold Berke
A modern home in North Shores

On the main drag of North Shores stands a gorgeous house.

I love its simple form (two tall boxes joined by a recessed “hyphen” and topped with a flat roof), colors (a soft grey set off by mustard, red, and black), lack of embellishment, and the way its slightly irregular arrangement of windows, doors, and decks pulls the composition back from total symmetry. The house is crisp and witty, and, despite four garage doors at ground level, seems to float over the landscape. The place makes me smile.

But tell people I’m smitten, and they give me a look of lemon-sucking disdain that even Violet, Dowager Duchess of Grantham in Downton Abbey, would be hard-put to surpass: head canted back and twisted, lips tightly pursed, eyes widened into saucers of disbelief.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Cross-Examining My Family's Texas Courthouse History

Posted on: February 19th, 2013 by Gwendolyn Purdom 3 Comments

 

The author’s great-great-great-grandfather was one of the first judges at the Comal County Courthouse. Robert Bodemann is pictured in front of the courthouse (fourth from the left) the year the structure was built. Credit: Gwendolyn Purdom
The author’s great-great-great-grandfather was one of the first judges at the Comal County Courthouse. Robert Bodemann is pictured in front of the courthouse (fourth from the left) the year the structure was built.

I never met my namesake. My maternal grandmother, Gwendolyn, died when my own mother was just a girl, along with my maternal grandfather a few years later. So my understanding of where I came from, on that side of the family at least, derives almost entirely from stories I’ve been told and the mountain of yellowed records, tattered documents, and black-and-white photos my mom keeps piled in an upstairs closet as unofficial “family historian.” Those things -- and the cornerstone of the 1898 Comal County Courthouse in New Braunfels, Texas.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Space to Reflect: The 57th Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service at Washington National Cathedral

Posted on: January 25th, 2013 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 1 Comment

 

This post, written by National Trust Executive Vice President and Chief Preservation Officer David J. Brown, originally appeared on SavingPlaces.org.

Outside Washington National Cathedral the morning of the 57th Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service. Credit: NewsHour, Flickr
Outside Washington National Cathedral the morning of the 57th Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service.

Every four years, when the country gathers to inaugurate a president, some of the nation’s most historic buildings take center stage. From the Benjamin Latrobe-designed St. John’s Church where the First Family attends a morning service, to the White House where the President meets with his successor or the leaders of Congress, to the U.S. Capitol where the Chief Executive takes the oath of office under a magnificent dome largely completed during the darkest days of the Civil War -- our nation’s peaceful transfer of power occurs in and around stately buildings that are cherished witnesses to history.

And the inauguration ceremonies end the following morning at yet another historic building -- Washington National Cathedral -- where the nation’s secular and religious leaders gather for the Presidential Inaugural Prayer Service.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

My Preservation Resolution: Build the Movement in 2013

Posted on: January 4th, 2013 by Priya Chhaya 2 Comments

 

Shutterbug series at Central Terminal, Buffalo, NY. Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation
Local preservationists at Buffalo's Central Terminal.

Observation: This is my fourth year putting pen to paper to map out my annual goals (see 2010, 2011, and 2012), and I’ve noticed that as the years go by, my list gets less specific.

Look at last year’s resolution, for example:

My 2012 Preservation Resolution is to not back down, to be inventive, to be engaged, and to look outside every box to find workable solutions in a challenging environment. For 2012 I vow to make connections and find tools that will allow preservationists to be all that they can be -- to turn opportunity into something tangible.

It could be that my resolutions are increasingly aspirational, and thus a little broader. But to look at it another way, my resolutions increasingly commit me to taking a stand, to changing minds and changing hearts -- not just with one action, but with a whole year of actions, one at a time.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.