Reflections

 

Sunrise over Fort Monroe. Credit: OkiGator, Flickr

Ten years ago I visited Fort Monroe with my colleague Free Harris, who served then as the National Trust’s director for diversity. The tour with Free, whose family is rooted in Hampton, was an eye-opener and my first step toward understanding what President Obama has called the fortress’s “storied history in the defense of our nation and the struggle for freedom.” Since then I’ve done my best to share Fort Monroe with my own family and to advocate effectively for this National Treasure.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Rob Nieweg

Rob Nieweg

Rob Nieweg is a Field Director & Attorney for the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He leads the National Trust’s Washington Field Office, which works to save historic resources in Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. He has worked as a preservation advocate since 1989.

Visiting Tinner Hill: Local History, National Significance

Posted on: February 25th, 2015 by Stephanie Meeks

 


Check out Stephanie's remarks at 12:38.

As president of the National Trust, I visit historic sites all over the country quite often -- that is my job! But recently, I had the chance to attend a special event right next to my home: the official opening of the Tinner Hill Historic Site in Falls Church, Virginia. There, a century ago, Falls Church residents stood up for civil rights and social justice. It was so welcome and inspiring to see my own community working to save the local places that matter, and that tell the full story of our area.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

[Q&A] The Chautauqua Amphitheater: An Insider’s Guide

Posted on: February 4th, 2015 by David Weible 1 Comment

 

The Amphitheater's open-air construction is one of its defining characteristics. It's speeches and concerts can be heard for blocks through the warm summer air.

The Amphitheater's open-air construction is one of its defining characteristics. Its speeches and concerts can be heard for blocks through the warm summer air.

Since it opened in 1875, the Chautauqua Institution in western New York has served as one of the great centers for public discourse on the important issues facing American society. And since 1893, the Chautauqua Amphitheater has been at the center of both that discourse and the community of Chautauqua itself.

Last week, as part of an announcement of the Amphitheater as one of our newest National Treasures, we published a Q&A with Vanity Fair architecture critic Paul Goldberger discussing the threat to the 4,000-seat, open-air structure’s historical integrity. This week, we thought we’d follow up with a Q&A with three life-long Chautauquans about what the Amp means to them.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

10 Preservation Wins & Losses in 2014

Posted on: December 31st, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 6 Comments

 

By Sarah Berger, Public Affairs Intern

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The year 2014 marked momentous milestones for preservation -- local communities fought for their landmarks, corporations embraced adaptive reuse, and a huge National Parks bill was passed by Congress. At the same time, more significant buildings and places were lost to neglect, demolition, and the test of time.

Since we are an optimistic group here at the National Trust, we want to focus on the positive preservation achievements, of which, there were many. And we will use the losses to propel us forward in our work to save America’s historic places.

As we celebrate our first year at the Watergate building, we are thankful for the growing support of our organization, and of the preservation movement as a whole. Transitioning into 2015, take a look back at preservation’s year in review; we hope it inspires you to make a difference in the New Year!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

This Old House: Fisherman Brown’s Cottage

Posted on: November 17th, 2014 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Susan Pollack

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Susan Pollack and her husband spent years hunting for their dream home, ultimately choosing this 1735 cottage in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The day my husband and I bought our house, the real estate agent gave us a loose-leaf binder with copies of maps and deeds dating back to 1735, when a fisherman named Joseph Brown built the Cape Ann Cottage.

For years we had looked at houses. We’d hoped to find a roomy, if neglected, Victorian that, with our efforts, might one day resemble one of the Gloucester houses celebrated by Edward Hopper. But “an antique?” That’s how our agent described the tiny gambrel-roofed cottage. Seeing its exposed adze-hewn beams, wide pine floorboards and fireplace, we said yes immediately.

I had lived in other people’s homes all of my adult life. Suddenly, I was not only a homeowner, but a steward of a piece of Cape Ann history. What does it mean to acquire a building with an historic marker posted on its clapboards? Does one’s responsibility go beyond keeping cedar shingles on the roof and a satellite dish off it? When you buy a house, do you inherit a responsibility to its history as well?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Summer with HOPE Crew: Inspiring a New Generation of Preservationists

Posted on: September 4th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Juliana Glassco, HOPE Crew Intern

HOPE Crew workers and scaffolding at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area included repainting the exterior of the historic Peters building. Credit Mathew Grubel, HOPE Crew craft expert
HOPE Crew work at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area included repainting the exterior of the historic Peters building.

In late August, I traveled with the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s HOPE Crew staff to visit the National Park Service’s Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, just in time to congratulate a HOPE Crew made up of Student Conservation Association (SCA) corpsmembers on a job well done as they completed a two-month project in the recreation area.

The crew members, most of them current college students or recent graduates, spent their summer documenting, cleaning, stabilizing, and painting historic structures. They spent most of their time at Camp Ken-Etiwa-Pec (KEP), a former camp constructed by Boy Scouts of America in the 1930s.

I was able to catch up with a few of the tired but happy crew members to talk about what they are taking away from their experience. The corpsmembers learned firsthand that preservation work isn’t always glamorous; they removed a LOT of debris from some of the structures that have been vacant for a few years -- and they had fun doing it!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.