Reflections

 

We're periodically featuring posts from our colleague Tom Mayes, deputy general counsel at the National Trust and a 2013 Rome Prize winner in Historic Preservation from the American Academy. (Follow Preservation Leadership Forum for Tom's periodic essays on "why old places matter.") Here on PreservationNation, he'll be sharing his reflections on preservation at home and abroad.

Patricia Cronin's "Ghosts" exhibit at Museo Centrale Montemartini, Rome, Italy. Credit: Thompson Mayes
Patricia Cronin's "Ghosts" exhibit at Museo Centrale Montemartini, Rome, Italy

“Context is everything,” says Patricia Cronin, talking about the placement of her art in old and historic places -- from the three-ton marble monument "Memorial to a Marriage" in historic Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, to her evanescent fabric Ghosts in Museo Centrale Montemartini, Rome.

“It’s not just ‘times three,’” she says. “It’s exponential.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

By Kathleen M. Yasas, President, Save The Sherburne Inn Restoration Project, Inc.

A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today. Credit: Rick L. Crowell Photography
A bird's-eye-view of The Sherburne Inn today.

There was no Jimmy Stewart. No basket full of cash spilled onto a table to get George Bailey out of trouble. No little girl telling her daddy that every time a bell sounds an angel gets his wings. But there is no question that angels were close by on December 6, 2013, when The Sherburne Inn opened its doors for the first time in more than decade to welcome over a hundred people to gather and celebrate the rebirth of a century-old landmark.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Beyond Beauty: Seeing Possibility in All Historic Places

Posted on: January 20th, 2014 by Priya Chhaya

 

Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C. Credit: CohenKenny, Flickr
Biltmore Estate in Asheville, N.C.

We often talk about historic places by their physical characteristics. It’s a building. A landscape. A barn. A train station. A home. We’re saving places.

But let’s try an experiment. Close your eyes. Clear your mind. What is the first thing that you see when you think about your favorite historic site?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.

 

Over the next few months, we'll be featuring posts from our colleague Tom Mayes, deputy general counsel at the National Trust and a 2013 Rome Prize winner in Historic Preservation from the American Academy. (Follow Preservation Leadership Forum for Tom's periodic essays on "why old places matter.") Here on PreservationNation, he'll be sharing his reflections on preservation at home and abroad.

Outside Venice's Arsenale, where the Biennale was held. Credit: Thompson Mayes
Outside Venice's Arsenale, where the Biennale was held

I recently took a quick trip to Venice to see the 55th Venice Biennale, an international art exhibition that happens every two years. Over two days, I wandered through the installations at the two primary locations -- the Giardini and the Arsenale.

Although I entered the exhibition thinking only about experiencing art, I quickly recognized that many works dealt with preservation issues. With a theme of the Encyclopedic Palace -- the idea of capturing all the world’s knowledge in a museum -- it’s not surprising that many of the artists grappled with themes of history, place, collective memory, and identity.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Giving Thanks for Preservation's Most Essential Part: Its People

Posted on: November 21st, 2013 by Priya Chhaya

 

Thirty Instagram aficionados went behind the scenes at Miami Marine Stadium in October 2013. Credit: RAYMEDphotography
Thirty Instagram aficionados went behind the scenes at National Treasure Miami Marine Stadium in October 2013.

Fall is when the leaves change color, the temperature lowers, and we look to places that bring us warmth and comfort. It is the season when we return home, the space where the first spark of the past comes together in a real and personal way. Autumn is a visible reminder of the passage of time, and when we Americans articulate our thanks for what the year has brought.

This fall, I am thankful for the people of preservation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya

Priya Chhaya is Associate Manager for Online Content, Preservation Resources at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A public historian at heart, she sees history wherever she goes and believes that it is an important part of the American identity.