Reflections

10 Preservation Wins & Losses in 2014

Posted on: December 31st, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation 6 Comments

 

By Sarah Berger, Public Affairs Intern

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The year 2014 marked momentous milestones for preservation -- local communities fought for their landmarks, corporations embraced adaptive reuse, and a huge National Parks bill was passed by Congress. At the same time, more significant buildings and places were lost to neglect, demolition, and the test of time.

Since we are an optimistic group here at the National Trust, we want to focus on the positive preservation achievements, of which, there were many. And we will use the losses to propel us forward in our work to save America’s historic places.

As we celebrate our first year at the Watergate building, we are thankful for the growing support of our organization, and of the preservation movement as a whole. Transitioning into 2015, take a look back at preservation’s year in review; we hope it inspires you to make a difference in the New Year!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

This Old House: Fisherman Brown’s Cottage

Posted on: November 17th, 2014 by Guest Writer 2 Comments

 

Written by Susan Pollack

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Susan Pollack and her husband spent years hunting for their dream home, ultimately choosing this 1735 cottage in Gloucester, Massachusetts.

The day my husband and I bought our house, the real estate agent gave us a loose-leaf binder with copies of maps and deeds dating back to 1735, when a fisherman named Joseph Brown built the Cape Ann Cottage.

For years we had looked at houses. We’d hoped to find a roomy, if neglected, Victorian that, with our efforts, might one day resemble one of the Gloucester houses celebrated by Edward Hopper. But “an antique?” That’s how our agent described the tiny gambrel-roofed cottage. Seeing its exposed adze-hewn beams, wide pine floorboards and fireplace, we said yes immediately.

I had lived in other people’s homes all of my adult life. Suddenly, I was not only a homeowner, but a steward of a piece of Cape Ann history. What does it mean to acquire a building with an historic marker posted on its clapboards? Does one’s responsibility go beyond keeping cedar shingles on the roof and a satellite dish off it? When you buy a house, do you inherit a responsibility to its history as well?... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

Summer with HOPE Crew: Inspiring a New Generation of Preservationists

Posted on: September 4th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Juliana Glassco, HOPE Crew Intern

HOPE Crew workers and scaffolding at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area included repainting the exterior of the historic Peters building. Credit Mathew Grubel, HOPE Crew craft expert
HOPE Crew work at Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area included repainting the exterior of the historic Peters building.

In late August, I traveled with the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s HOPE Crew staff to visit the National Park Service’s Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, just in time to congratulate a HOPE Crew made up of Student Conservation Association (SCA) corpsmembers on a job well done as they completed a two-month project in the recreation area.

The crew members, most of them current college students or recent graduates, spent their summer documenting, cleaning, stabilizing, and painting historic structures. They spent most of their time at Camp Ken-Etiwa-Pec (KEP), a former camp constructed by Boy Scouts of America in the 1930s.

I was able to catch up with a few of the tired but happy crew members to talk about what they are taking away from their experience. The corpsmembers learned firsthand that preservation work isn’t always glamorous; they removed a LOT of debris from some of the structures that have been vacant for a few years -- and they had fun doing it!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

A Farewell to South Dakota’s Human Services Center, a Past 11 Most Site

Posted on: June 24th, 2014 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Jenny Buddenborg, Denver Senior Field Officer

Credit: Jenny Buddenborg, National Trust for Historic Preservation
Built in 1898 and listed on the National Register, the Lee building featured a load-bearing masonry exterior with a wood-framed interior. It was demolished instead of being reused for a different purpose.

So much of our work as preservation advocates places us in the role of influencing decisions but not necessarily having the power to make crucial decisions ourselves. This is particularly difficult when you are trying to save a threatened place that is not under your ownership or management.

Succeeding under these circumstances is immensely satisfying, but losing is tremendously frustrating. Just because you want something to happen and you put as much energy and resource into it as possible doesn’t mean it will. Ultimately, your priority may never become a priority for the people you try to persuade.

That is how I felt after recently losing nine of 11 historic buildings to the wrecking ball at the Human Services Center (HSC) in Yankton, S.D., after spending five years advocating alongside partners for their preservation and adaptive reuse.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

 

By William Tyre, Executive Director and Curator, Glessner House Museum


Glessner House Museum, restored 2011.

In 2013, Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago was designated a National Historic Landmark (NHL) -- the only individually listed church in the city to be so honored. On a personal level it represented something very special to me because it meant that I now lived, worked, and worshiped in National Historic Landmarks -- something I consider to be a rare and possibly unique privilege.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.