Real Estate

Historic Properties for Sale: Small on Mortgage, Big on History

Posted on: January 5th, 2011 by Sarah Heffern

 

Circa 1863 home for sale in New Market, MD.

Circa 1863 home for sale in New Market, MD.

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent. Today, we're looking at  a few listings that won't (necessarily) break the bank.

I've lived in Washington, DC long enough to know that I am, well, let's say jaded when it comes to real estate prices.  The tiny clapboard-fronted row houses on my street routinely sell for well upwards of a half-million dollars, and I've seen one bedroom condos in my neighborhood list for just a shade under $300K. I'm not the best person to ask when it comes to what a reasonable price for a house is, since even during the downturn, I haven't seen a reasonable price in years. (Oh, yes... I do rent. How did you guess?)

Blueberry Manor in Fayetteville, PA.

Blueberry Manor in Fayetteville, PA.

These listings, however, caught my eye because they really seem like a steal. A 3,000 square foot plantation house on 20 acres in South Carolina for $250K? Or how about a seven-bedroom mansion named after the blueberries that grow on its property (giving a new meaning to "bed and breakfast") for less than $300,000? And this antebellum plantation in Missouri is only $285K? For real? And I can hardly believe this Main Street corner property in Maryland's "antiques capital" is just $199,900. Honestly, these are deals so compelling that they're making me think about telecommuting options... I mean, New Market, Maryland isn't that far, right?

These - and many, many other listings - are available now through our Historic Properties for Sale website. Check it out!

Sarah Heffern is the content manager for PreservationNation.org.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

Historic Properties for Sale: Greek Revival Edition

Posted on: December 23rd, 2010 by Alex Baca

 

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday.* It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent.  This week, check out these Greek Revival properties. With columns galore, they'd look fantastic draped in garland for the holidays...

This is the backyard of Temple Hills, a four-story planter's townhouse in Columbus, Mississippi. Built around 1837, this Mississippi Landmark property is on the National Register and the Historic American Buildings Survey. It's restored, furnished, boasts terraced grounds with two period outbuildings, and fourteen Doric columns.

If you would like to make those fourteen Doric columns your own, you'll have to contact the agent. See the full listing here.

Falling Spring, in Sheperdstown, West Virginia, "is steeped in history and presents a rare opportunity to acquire a significant piece of history." The property includes the original smoke house, carriage house, guest house, and springs that lend the estate, built in 1830, its name. Preside over Falling Spring's 10.9 acres for $850,000.

See the full listing, and an extensive history, here.

* Yes, we know it's Thursday. An Internet outage yesterday at the National Trust headquarters prevented getting this posted on its normal day.

Alex Baca, a senior at the University of Maryland, is an intern in the Online Communications department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and also at the Washington City Paper.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Mixed Use Edition

Posted on: December 15th, 2010 by Alex Baca

 

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent.  This week, check out these properties that, located in mixed-use structures, are more than just housing.

This loft apartment was renovated in 2001 and "can boast the only survivor of original Coe Block on Columbia Street" in Bangor, Maine. The expansive, multi-story property sports a ground-floor studio, a second-floor rental office, and the residential loft on the third and fourth floors. All that space--and original woodworking--can be yours for $450,000. See the full listing here.

While this property in Mobile, Alabama isn't strictly mixed use, it's got the potential to serve as office, retail, or residential space--if not all three at once! The Kress Building, circa 1914, is two floors, 8,700 square feet, and lies in a 2-block radius that has seen around $500 million in investment over the past five years. It's also within the Lower Dauphin Street Historic District. Looks like it's the place to be. The Kress Building can be yours for...well, you'll have to contact the agent for that. See the full listing here.

Alex Baca, a senior at the University of Maryland, is an intern in the Online Communications department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and also at the Washington City Paper.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Fantastic Farms

Posted on: December 8th, 2010 by Alex Baca 1 Comment

 

As we mentioned last week, we'll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It's just like Preservation magazine's well-loved homes section, but much more frequent.  This week, check out these fantastic farm properties.

The Historic Cristman Barn sits on 33 square acres of land near Cooperstown, New York (that's right: Baseball!). Its listing boasts "Featured in Architecture magazines, this fantastic 1886, 10,000 sq. ft. Post & Beam Barn has been converted to a six bedroom, 7 1/2 bath residence, but it continues to retain its unique original characteristics.  Soaring ceilings reach to 20 feet in some places,and the first floor, which has stone walls, featues an open floor plan that flows from the huge dining room, to a spacious living room, an atrium, a family room, a card/game room with a wet bar, and a hearth room with a stone fireplace.  The kitchen includes restaurant-quality appliances." Fancy, huh? It's yours for $1,600,000. See the full listing here.

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If a fixer-upper is more your style, may we suggest the Tudor Farm outside of Annapolis, Maryland. The building is circa 1723 and "is an extraordinary opportunity to restore a historic estate that is rich in history, with much of its original detailing intact." Construction costs might set you back so, fortunately, the Tudor Farm is a steal at$1,290,000. See the full listing (and read the property's extensive history) here.

Alex Baca, a senior at the University of Maryland, is an intern in the Online Communications department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and also at the Washington City Paper.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Homes for Sale: Not Just for the Magazine Anymore

Posted on: December 1st, 2010 by Sarah Heffern 2 Comments

 

Philip Johnson’s first commission, the Booth House, in Bedford, NY.

Philip Johnson’s first commission, the Booth House, in Bedford, NY.

I think we've all been in this situation at one time or another: When telling someone for the first time where you work, they reply with the one fact - or cliché - they know about your job. ("Oh? You work for NASA? I guess you really are a rocket scientist!") Here at the National Trust for Historic Preservation, we usually hear, "Oh! I get your magazine!" followed immediately by, "I always look at the houses for sale first!"

I totally understand this impulse. It's the same one that gets us out the door to open houses on Sundays whether or not we're house hunting. And sells jillions of home design magazines. And keeps channels like HGTV and DIY on the air. We all want to see how other people live, and perhaps for a brief moment, pretend their lives are ours.

The J­ava Head estate in Coral Gables, FL.

The J­ava Head estate in Coral Gables, FL.

I'm happy to report that, for historic home fans like us, this is no longer a habit that can only be indulged once every two months when the newest edition of Preservation lands in your mailbox. We've launched a real estate section on our site where anyone selling a historic home can load up an advertisement at any time, which means a fairly constant stream of new houses to drool over. Right now, you could buy the first house Philip Johnson was commissioned to design, or an Art Moderne estate, or a Tuscan villa. (A Tuscan villa! Want!)

Not all of the homes are straight from fantasy-land, however - listings range from must-sell distressed properties to fixer-uppers to well, villas. And Philip Johnson houses.

For the next few months (or maybe longer) we'll be featuring a listing or two every Wednesday here on the PreservationNation blog. Think of it as an online reminder to gape at historic homes, in the same way that Preservation hitting your mailbox has been for all these years.  So go ahead - stop by and take a peek in the windows... you just might find the home of your dreams!

Sarah Heffern is the content manager for PreservationNation.org.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.