Real Estate

 

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent. This week we're looking at a lovely selection of Victorians.

Charles Town, West Virginia

Charles Town, West Virginia

I grew up with house envy. Don't get me wrong, the house I grew up in was perfectly nice, but I lived on the newer south side of town, where the houses all dated from the 1930s and 40s, rather than on the west side, where the Victorian houses were. Of course, I didn't know at the time that they were Victorians - I just knew they had towers, and bright paint colors, and huge wrap-around porches, and they looked to me like castles. I wanted one, specifically one with a turret, because I knew a tower bedroom was clearly what I meant to have, being a a girl with princess ambitions - decades before Disney made it a marketing concept.

As I grew up and realized the my name meaning "princess" was as close as I was ever going to get to the royal life, I developed an appreciation for the house - and neighborhood - I grew up in. This week's new listings, however, reminded me how much I used to covet the Victorians on Riverside Drive.

Take this gem in Henderson, Kentucky - shown above - for example. Tower? Check. Massive front porch? Check. Added bonus? It was featured in the movie A League of their Own. (Fun fact: "There's no crying in baseball!" may be the movie line I quote more than any other.)

Henderson, Kentucky

Henderson, Kentucky

The Perkins House also sports a turret and a spiffy porch, but this Charles Town, West Virginia, house has a claim to fame that's more historic than cinematic - it's on the property where abolitionist hero John Brown was executed. (Being much geekier about Civil War history than I am about baseball, I find this to be even cooler than the house above.)

Of course, these are just a couple of the options that appear when you search "Victorian" on the Historic Real Estate. Others include a house in Lewes, Delaware that's just minutes from the beach, the Greenhills Farm in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and a charming greystone on Chicago's Gold Coast.

Oh, now... there is is again. My old friend house envy.

Sarah Heffern is the content manager for PreservationNation.org. Every week when she writes this post she wonders anew why it is that she lives in a 600-square-foot apartment.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

Historic Properties for Sale: Small on Mortgage, Big on History

Posted on: January 5th, 2011 by Sarah Heffern

 

Circa 1863 home for sale in New Market, MD.

Circa 1863 home for sale in New Market, MD.

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent. Today, we're looking at a few listings that won't (necessarily) break the bank.

I've lived in Washington, DC long enough to know that I am, well, let's say jaded when it comes to real estate prices. The tiny clapboard-fronted row houses on my street routinely sell for well upwards of a half-million dollars, and I've seen one bedroom condos in my neighborhood list for just a shade under $300K. I'm not the best person to ask when it comes to what a reasonable price for a house is, since even during the downturn, I haven't seen a reasonable price in years. (Oh, yes... I do rent. How did you guess?)

Blueberry Manor in Fayetteville, PA.

Blueberry Manor in Fayetteville, PA.

These listings, however, caught my eye because they really seem like a steal. A 3,000 square foot plantation house on 20 acres in South Carolina for $250K? Or how about a seven-bedroom mansion named after the blueberries that grow on its property (giving a new meaning to "bed and breakfast") for less than $300,000? And this antebellum plantation in Missouri is only $285K? For real? And I can hardly believe this Main Street corner property in Maryland's "antiques capital" is just $199,900. Honestly, these are deals so compelling that they're making me think about telecommuting options... I mean, New Market, Maryland isn't that far, right?

These - and many, many other listings - are available now through our Historic Properties for Sale website. Check it out!

Sarah Heffern is the content manager for PreservationNation.org.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class.

Historic Properties for Sale: Greek Revival Edition

Posted on: December 23rd, 2010 by Alex Baca

 

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday.* It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent. This week, check out these Greek Revival properties. With columns galore, they'd look fantastic draped in garland for the holidays...

This is the backyard of Temple Hills, a four-story planter's townhouse in Columbus, Mississippi. Built around 1837, this Mississippi Landmark property is on the National Register and the Historic American Buildings Survey. It's restored, furnished, boasts terraced grounds with two period outbuildings, and fourteen Doric columns.

If you would like to make those fourteen Doric columns your own, you'll have to contact the agent. See the full listing here.

Falling Spring, in Sheperdstown, West Virginia, "is steeped in history and presents a rare opportunity to acquire a significant piece of history." The property includes the original smoke house, carriage house, guest house, and springs that lend the estate, built in 1830, its name. Preside over Falling Spring's 10.9 acres for $850,000.

See the full listing, and an extensive history, here.

* Yes, we know it's Thursday. An Internet outage yesterday at the National Trust headquarters prevented getting this posted on its normal day.

Alex Baca, a senior at the University of Maryland, is an intern in the Online Communications department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and also at the Washington City Paper.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Mixed Use Edition

Posted on: December 15th, 2010 by Alex Baca

 

We’ll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It’s just like Preservation magazine’s well-loved homes section, but much more frequent. This week, check out these properties that, located in mixed-use structures, are more than just housing.

This loft apartment was renovated in 2001 and "can boast the only survivor of original Coe Block on Columbia Street" in Bangor, Maine. The expansive, multi-story property sports a ground-floor studio, a second-floor rental office, and the residential loft on the third and fourth floors. All that space--and original woodworking--can be yours for $450,000. See the full listing here.

While this property in Mobile, Alabama isn't strictly mixed use, it's got the potential to serve as office, retail, or residential space--if not all three at once! The Kress Building, circa 1914, is two floors, 8,700 square feet, and lies in a 2-block radius that has seen around $500 million in investment over the past five years. It's also within the Lower Dauphin Street Historic District. Looks like it's the place to be. The Kress Building can be yours for...well, you'll have to contact the agent for that. See the full listing here.

Alex Baca, a senior at the University of Maryland, is an intern in the Online Communications department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and also at the Washington City Paper.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Fantastic Farms

Posted on: December 8th, 2010 by Alex Baca 1 Comment

 

As we mentioned last week, we'll be featuring listings from our Historic Properties for Sale site every Wednesday. It's just like Preservation magazine's well-loved homes section, but much more frequent. This week, check out these fantastic farm properties.

The Historic Cristman Barn sits on 33 square acres of land near Cooperstown, New York (that's right: Baseball!). Its listing boasts "Featured in Architecture magazines, this fantastic 1886, 10,000 sq. ft. Post & Beam Barn has been converted to a six bedroom, 7 1/2 bath residence, but it continues to retain its unique original characteristics. Soaring ceilings reach to 20 feet in some places,and the first floor, which has stone walls, featues an open floor plan that flows from the huge dining room, to a spacious living room, an atrium, a family room, a card/game room with a wet bar, and a hearth room with a stone fireplace. The kitchen includes restaurant-quality appliances." Fancy, huh? It's yours for $1,600,000. See the full listing here.

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If a fixer-upper is more your style, may we suggest the Tudor Farm outside of Annapolis, Maryland. The building is circa 1723 and "is an extraordinary opportunity to restore a historic estate that is rich in history, with much of its original detailing intact." Construction costs might set you back so, fortunately, the Tudor Farm is a steal at$1,290,000. See the full listing (and read the property's extensive history) here.

Alex Baca, a senior at the University of Maryland, is an intern in the Online Communications department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and also at the Washington City Paper.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.