Real Estate

Historic Properties for Sale: The Game of MASH Edition

Posted on: August 19th, 2011 by David Garber 1 Comment

 

No need for embarrassment. We all played MASH (Mansion, Apartment, Shack, House). You know, that game that predicts who you'll end up with, what kind of car you'll drive, what your job will be, and what kind of place you'll live in? I remember distinct moments on the playground and in carpool being so intrigued by what my future might hold. Because, duh, the game does have real-life epic powers of prediction... right?

Anyway, what better way to rehash those grand old days than to play the grown-up version with houses that are actually for sale??

 MANSION

The Starrett Mansion - Port Townsend, Washington


(Photo: Flickr user josema_a)

The Starrett Mansion overlooks the city and bay of Port Townsend, Washington. Built in 1889 by George Starrett for his beloved wife Anne, the house is also known as "the House of the Four Seasons" because of the frescoes that depict the four seasons hand painted on the cieling of the home's three story tower. Pricetag: $899,000

APARTMENT

New Raton Hotel Apartments - Raton, New Mexico

Now, of course this is a properties for sale post, so in the name of staying true to the game and the blog, this listing is an adapted hotel that contains three apartments - and a ground floor restaurant called the Santa Fe Cafe. Pricetag: $785,000

SHACK

Fachwerk Sunday HouseCastroville, Texas

Looking for a charming fixer upper with some acreage? This 1845 historic 1-bedroom, 1-bath, 633 square feet Alsacian-style fachwerk home boast 83 feet of Medina river frontage, and is located just 23 miles west of San Antonio. Pricetag: $179,000

HOUSE

Historic Ott Farm House - Raphine, Virginia

Located on ten acres of rolling pasture and adjacent to easement-protected land, the Ott Farm house was built in 1854 in the Carpenter Gothic style. The home is located only 45 minutes from Charlottesville and with its central AC and updated kitchen, is perfectly suited to modern family living. Pricetag: $495,000

So, which one did you get? The Queen Anne Victorian on the seaside of Washington state, the apartment in New Mexico, the (okay people it does have potential) shack in Texas, or the historically-beautiful house in Virginia? *Cue Jeapardy waiting music.* The mansion?! Lucky...

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. If memory serves him right, he dreaded the "apartment" option as a child, yet now does, in fact, live in one.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Virginia Country Glamour Edition

Posted on: August 12th, 2011 by David Garber

 

Today's highlighted Historic Properties for Sale all hail from that oh-so-wonderfully-American and oh-so-expensively-close-to-Washington-DC land called the Northern Virginia countryside.

Canterbury - Warrenton, Virginia
(Get ready for some serious glam country, folks.)

Called “One of the most beautiful homes in America" by the American and French Society of Architects after its completion in 1939, this majestic Georgian Revival home sits on 373 acres behind a mile-long private driveway.

Canterbury was modernized and restored to its original elegance in 2007. Pricetag: $14,500,000

Orange Hill - Marshall, Virginia

Built in 1801, this Georgian manor home sits on 200 acres in the prestigious Orange County Hunt.

As you can see, the home boasts gorgeous views of the countryside, and has that very Virginian foxhunts-and-boxwoods feel about it. Into horses? There's a 13-stall stable right on the property. Pricetag: $7,500,000

Pelham - Middleburg, Virginia

Pelham was built in 1878 and features whimsical design features of the Victorian age. As you can see, the home features a gracious front porch and cascading lawns that open up toward an expansive view of the Blue Ridge foothills.

The property contains a historic 6-stall barn with a wood paneled lounge area, exposed beams, heart of pine floors, built in shelves, half bath, kitchenette, and a cedar-lined storage room. Pricetag: $4,250,000

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media department at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He'd look into buying these houses, but then, he doesn't *quite* have the down-payment saved up.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Dr. Generous Henderson Edition

Posted on: August 5th, 2011 by David Garber

 

Built in 1899 along Kansas City's then-prestigious Paseo boulevard, The Dr. Generous Henderson House is the last remaining Second Italian Renaissance Revival structure in the city, and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The home was built for a Dr. Generous Henderson whose Kansas City medical practice existed for forty-five years.

According to the National Register nomination for the house,

Dr. Henderson was born in New London, Indiana. He graduated from the Chicago Medical College and the medical department of the University of Michigan. Around 1880, after practicing in Chicago for twelve years, he moved to Kansas City.and began a medical practice that would continue for forty-five years. Advertisements he placed in the local newspapers encouraged consultation by letter, stressed his numerous cures for "sexual debility and private diseases", offered picture books describing diseases, and mentioned the free museum in his office.


(Photo: National Register of Historic Places)

The home boasts 5,515 square feet and is zoned for both residential and commercial use, and comes with a carriage house out back (fully accessible via an underground tunnel from the basement). Any takers?

If this house isn't exactly what you're looking for, check out our many other listings on the Historic Properties for Sale website.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Woodsy Modernism Edition

Posted on: July 29th, 2011 by David Garber

 

"Life moves pretty fast. You don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it. " Sometimes even fast enough to shatter a curtain wall...

"The place is like a museum. It's very beautiful and very cold, and you're not allowed to touch anything."

If you've seen "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" you probably remember the scene where Ferris and his buddy Cameron return the rare 1961 Ferrari GT California that they "borrowed" from Cameron's dad. Cameron is freaking out. Ferris, characteristically, is trying to keep things cool. But it's the location that truly makes the scene: the glassy garage of the 1953 modernist Highland Park home designed by A. James Speyer and David Haid. (That, incidentally, was up for sale earlier this year.)

Now before we let this scene take over the entire post (believe me, if I could, I would), the reason I bring this up is because the house and garage fit perfectly into today's Historic Properties for Sale category: woodsy modernism. Fortunately, we've got a couple listings that bring young Mr. Frye's house to mind.

The Round House - Worthington, Ohio

Situated among mature trees in the mid-century neighborhood of Rush Creek Village just outside Columbus, the Round House is a crisp specimen of the style's affinity for natural materials, simple shapes, and a yielding presence on the landscape. I mean, who doesn't want banquette seating lining their curved living room wall? (See more great photos on the listing.)

18 Twin Pond Lane - Lincoln, Massachusetts

If the above photo doesn't prove the whole woodsy modernism thing, the description of this 1962 home seals it: "The house is a modest wood-framed contemporary; secluded in a wooded neighborhood with proximity to walking trails and permanently protected conservation land." Appears to be a fixer-upper, but who isn't up for a little (or a lot of) DIY?

Where do woodsy modern houses fit on your own list of most-desired house styles? Is Ferris Bueller right about them feeling cold and museum-like?

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. You know, although the style probably wouldn't top his list of all-time most wanted homes (there's a creepiness factor to them), he certainly wouldn't turn one down.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Properties for Sale: Ski Vacation, Please Edition

Posted on: July 22nd, 2011 by David Garber

 

In this ultra heatwave (we're at a 119 degree heat index here in DC) a post dedicated to "houses near skiing" was all I could do to survive. *gasps for air* Not a skier? Never fear, all these houses work just as well for those that enjoy glorious vistas, good country and small town livin'.

Asa Burton Farmhouse - Thetford, Vermont

Behind this Cape Cod exterior sits one of the most charming and authentic 18th-century houses in Vermont, originally built by one of Thetford’s first ministers.  A former dairy farm, it sits on 12 acres, with two barns and a two-story workshop, and an attached two-car garage perfect for storing your snowplow. Ahh, the practical side of ski-home homeownership. Hey, on a day like today, bring it on.

The Wells House - Newbury, Vermont

Built in 1830, this beautiful cape sits on an almost 2-acre lot in the heart of the Newbury Village Historic District. Fun fact: during the mid 1800s the Wells House served as a boarding house for the first Methodist theological school in America, out of which Boston University and Vermont College were later formed.

Greystone Lodge - Mount Jackson, Virginia

Nestled on over 22 acres overlooking Bryce Ski Resort, Greystone Lodge is a Manor-style Cape Cod built in or around 1929 and used as a hunting lodge. Loose rumors have it that ranking government officials, including the likes of Roosevelt and Churchill, met here during World War II.

David Garber is a member of the Digital and New Media team at the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Seeing as people pay good money for hot yoga, he is considering organizing a flash session on the sidewalks of DC later this afternoon. BYOM (bring your own mat).

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.