Real Estate

Historic Real Estate: The Modestly Scaled Edition

Posted on: May 3rd, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

blog_photo_Barnaby House
Barnaby House in Oxford, Md.

Historic Barnaby House -- Oxford, Maryland

The Barnaby House is one of only three 18th-century buildings remaining in Oxford, a small town on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, and the only one that has retained its original historic integrity. Inside the one-and-a-half story house, you’ll find elaborate Georgian woodwork, raised panel woodwork, and a series of incised schooners that decorate the kitchen fireplace. Price tag:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

 

In our ongoing series about buying a historic home, we've covered how to find a historic house, determine its architectural style (parts One and Two), and finance the cost. Today we're on to the next step in the process -- how to inspect the house to make sure it is in good condition.

Of course, a professional inspection -- which will cover many of these same areas, but with greater depth and accuracy -- is necessary once you move from looking to buying, but knowing what to look for while you're shopping around can help you make your decision!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

[10 on Tuesday] How to Finance Your Historic House

Posted on: April 23rd, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 2 Comments

 

We've talked about how to find a historic house and figure out its style (parts One and Two), so this week, we'll cover how you can help pay for it all.

Purchasing a house is a complex process, with many steps, costs, and decisions along the way. When you’re buying a historic house in particular, there are a few different elements and terms you’ll want to be aware of ahead of time so you can prepare and plan accordingly.

Side note: You’ll find this toolkit referencing things like deed restrictions, easements, and historic house inspections. We will explain these concepts in more detail in upcoming toolkits so you have the complete picture.

But in the meantime, let’s talk about the money. Here’s what you need to know about financing your historic house:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

Historic Real Estate: The 19th Century Edition

Posted on: April 19th, 2013 by Emily Potter 1 Comment

 

blog_photo_Stone Cottage, Burlington, NJ
Stone Cottage, on the corner of Riverbank and Talbot Streets in Burlington, NJ.

1840 Stone Cottage -- Burlington, New Jersey

Designed and built by acclaimed Philadelphia architects William Strickland and Thomas Ustick Walter, this nearly 5,000-square-foot cottage is a Gothic Revival masterpiece. It was built on the highest point of Burlington City’s riverfront and offers gorgeous views and original historic features throughout. Price tag:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.

 

Part Two of our architectural style digest (read Part One here) offers definitions and examples of houses from approximately 1855 up to 1960.

When you’re looking at historic houses, it’s important to remember that many are not exactly a single kind of style. You’ll discover that some have used other materials or details not found in the technical definition, or alterations, additions, and updates have melded two different styles together.

These nuances and variations are what make each historic house special and oftentimes historically significant. So preserve them, celebrate them, and enjoy them!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Emily Potter

Emily Potter is a copywriter at the National Trust. She enjoys writing about places of all kinds, the stories that make them special, and the people who love them enough to save them.