Preservation Magazine

Behind the Scenes in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Posted on: September 26th, 2013 by Julia Rocchi 1 Comment

 

Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Ark., is now a brewery and distillery. Credit: Rush Jagoe
Superior Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Ark., is now a brewery and distillery.

Our travel feature in the Fall issue of Preservation magazine puts the spotlight on Hot Springs, Ark., an unexpected gem in the Ouachita Mountains where thermal waters played a huge role in the city's past -- and are now influencing its future.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi

Julia Rocchi is the associate director for digital content at the National Trust. By day she wrangles content; by night (and weekends), she shops local, travels to story-rich places, and walks around looking up at buildings.

See the Unseen: Amazing 3-D Views of Historic Churches and Theaters

Posted on: September 26th, 2013 by Lauren Walser 2 Comments

 

Reconstructed Chapter House. Vina, California. (2013)

For the past two years, San Francisco-based designer Scott Page has been taking his 11-lb. 3-D laser scanner into historic churches and theaters all around the Bay Area, including Bernard Maybeck’s First Church of Christ, Scientist in Berkeley and the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, collecting point clouds of data and photographic images to quickly and accurately map every detail of a building’s interior, down to each visible beam and pipe.

“[Scanning] allows you to visualize buildings in ways you couldn’t see them before,” Page says. “You can really get to places where you couldn’t before, even just five years ago.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

10 Recommended Stops on the Journey Through Hallowed Ground

Posted on: September 25th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Oak Hill, James Monroe's country estate. Credit: Gordon Beall
Oak Hill, James Monroe's country estate

The 180-mile long, 75-mile wide Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area stretches from Gettysburg, Pa. to Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello near Charlottesville, Va. Featuring hundreds of historical treasures such as presidential homes (including James Monroe’s Oak Hill, featured in the Fall issue of Preservation,) National and State Parks, Civil War battlefields, and historic towns and villages, the heritage corridor affords visitors the unique opportunity to take in centuries of overlapping American history and to walk in the footsteps of some of our country’s most influential leaders.

We’ve rounded up a top 10 list of lesser-known Hallowed Ground sites that are well worth a stop on the journey:... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

The Moravian Legacy: Discovering the Group's Southern Stronghold

Posted on: September 25th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 3 Comments

 

Bethabara Moravian Church also known as the Gemeinhaus. Credit: Jeanette Runyon, Flickr
Bethabara Moravian Church (also known as the Gemeinhaus) in Winston-Salem, N.C.

In this fall’s Itinerary department of Preservation magazine, three locals provide a virtual tour of historic Bethlehem, Pa., and the surrounding Lehigh Valley’s industrial ancestry and Moravian heritage. But for a better understanding of who these Moravians really are, we thought we’d share a bit more of their story, along with an outline of another area where their history and influence can be explored.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

(l.) Unisphere from the 1964 World's Fair; (r.) Cover of Tomorrow-Land. Photos courtesy TAPorto, Flickr; Lyons Press.
(l.) Unisphere from the 1964 World's Fair; (r.) Cover of Tomorrow-Land.

The theme of the 1964-65 World’s Fair in New York was “Peace Through Understanding.” But as Joseph Tirella demonstrates in his forthcoming book, Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World’s Fair and the Transformation of America (Lyons Press), the fair’s preparations -- and the United States, in general -- were anything but peaceful in turbulent 1960s America.

Tirella, a widely published journalist who has covered Queens, N.Y., for the New York Times’ City section, follows New York’s fair from its earliest days as a seed of an idea to 18 months after the last visitor left the fairgrounds and the land was rechristened Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

With great detail, he tells the story of powerful Robert Moses, New York’s “Master Builder” who used any number of tricks and tactics to create the fair he envisioned -- even when it became clear to the public that the fair was a financial disaster. He lays bare the political landscape of New York and all its major players, as well as all the negotiations and in-fighting that took place during the years leading up to the fair’s opening.

And Tirella takes readers past these planning stages to the opening day of the fair, when the pavilions were largely panned by architecture critics and the number of actual visitors fell far short of expectations.

1964 World's Fair Pavilion. Photo courtesy: Bill Cotter, www.worldsfairphotos.com
1964 World's Fair Pavilion

But understanding the 1964-65 fair and what led to its disappointing outcome, Tirella argues, requires an examination beyond the fair itself. It requires a closer look at America in the ‘60s. After all, fairs had always been a celebration of cultures, nations, and ideas, with an eye to the excitement of the future. Why was this fair not greeted with the same enthusiasm?

To answer that, Tirella presents an impressive historic overview of the decade, spanning popular music trends, the political climate, Civil Rights efforts, and the rise in urban crime. He surveys the major players of the decade -- the Beatles, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Andy Warhol, for starters -- and the major events -- like the Harlem Riots, New York City’s crackdown on downtown bohemians and artists, and the Vietnam War -- to show that the world was changing in ways that no longer fit with the common ethos of the fairs of the past.

Tomorrow-Land will hit bookshelves in January 2014, just months before the 50th anniversary of the opening of the New York World’s Fair.

Until then, you can read more about the fair, and the current state of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, in the Fall 2013 issue of Preservation magazine.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.