Preservation Magazine

Preservation Battle Ends in Demolition of Texas School

Posted on: September 27th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Denison High SchoolWhen a North Texas high school began to fall in June, the town rallied around it, trying everything to save the 94-year-old structure. In just two months, a grassroots group raised $2 million to preserve Old Denison High School.

"I have never seen a preservation battle like this," says Denise Alexander, program officer at the National Trust's Southwest Office, which gave Castle's group a grant for a conditions-assessment report. "To raise $700,000 in a month with commitments of up to $2 million … the outpouring of support has really been amazing."

But on Monday, after months of legal battles and a resident's last-minute offer to buy the building, a crane began demolishing the last section of the Spanish Mission style-building.

"I'm very angry with the short-sightedness of it all," says Michelle Castle, who led the effort to save the 1913 section of the school. "They shouldn't have rushed to the demolition."... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Boston's 19th-Century Jail Reopens as Hotel

Posted on: September 26th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Liberty Hotel, BostonAfter housing inmates since the 19th century, Boston's former Charles Street Jail now hosts hotel guests.

Completed in 1851, the Boston Granite Style building had been empty since 1990.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Disney Museum Takes Shape in San Francisco's Presidio

Posted on: September 25th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

1897 Presidio barracks (Page & Turnbull)Disney in the Presidio?

That's right. This month, workers are busy converting three historic buildings in San Francisco's Presidio, a National Park, for the future Walt Disney Family Museum.

"People are very surprised," says Carolyn Kiernat, principal at Page & Turnbull, the San Francisco firm overseeing the project. "Their first question tends to be 'Why in the Presidio?'"

Two years ago, Walt Disney's daughter, Diane Miller, and her husband, Ron, asked Jay Turnbull to design a museum near their home in Northern California about her father's life and work.

The family found the site ideal, Kiernat says. "Walt Disney was a huge fan of the military and Gen. Pershing [who commanded the Presidio] in particular." In addition, she says, the museum building "recalls the Main Street USA in Disney World." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Louis Sullivan's Last Chicago Building Restored

Posted on: September 24th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

Krause Music, SteveHall@HedrichBlessing.comThings are looking up for the oeuvre of Louis Sullivan (1856-1924), the architect known as the father of modernism. After three of his buildings were destroyed last year, his last commission, the 1922 Krause Music Store in Chicago, was renovated this year.

The National Register-listed building's terra cotta exterior was restored and its interior converted to offices; this month, workers are completing the landscaping portion of the project.

"Being the son of an architect, my dad always pointed out the Krause Music store. I've known the building for years," says Jacob Goldberg, president of Chicago-based Goldberg General Contracting, Inc., which completed the 16-month project this spring. "To get the opportunity and the responsibility to restore the facade and renovate the whole building was a really big deal for me." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Betting on Saratoga's Future

Posted on: September 20th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Saratoga Springs FoundationThe racehorses may be finished for the season at Saratoga Race Course, but the ordeal regarding the future of the famous racetrack is far from over.

The Saratoga Race Course, which opened in the city of Saratoga Springs in 1863, is the oldest organized sporting venue in the United States, and track attendance and profits increase each season. Will its good fortune last?

Although the state owns the buildings and tracks, the New York Racing Association (NYRA) currently owns the franchise to run thoroughbred racing at Saratoga Race Course. Because that contract ends in December, many wonder what will happen to the 350-acre racing complex. With talk of possible renovation and modernization, Saratoga residents fear the racecourse is in danger of losing its historical charm.

For the past two years, an extensive proposal and bidding process has gone on between NYRA and other contenders in anticipation of NYRA's soon-to-expire contract, and after reviewing all proposals, Gov. Spitzer decided to recommend that NYRA receive the franchise for the next 30 years. The final decision, expected in December, is in the hands of state legislators, who must determine whether to take the governor's recommendation or choose a different company.

Saratoga Springs Preservation Foundation Supervisor Joanne Yepsen thinks the state and its legislators should consider residents during the decision-making process, as the upcoming year could mean big changes.

"We don't want to see the relationship between the residents and NYRA deteriorate due to lack of zoning or planning. There needs to be a partnership, as opposed to the residents just taking what they can get."

- Jeesoo Park

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.