Preservation Magazine

Brad Pitt Visits Farnsworth House

Posted on: August 22nd, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mies van der Rohe’s glass-and-steel temple (Jon Miller, Hedrich Blessing)Brad Pitt, the world's most famous architecture fan, visited Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House this week, generating $60,000 for the National Trust Historic Site outside Plano, Ill.

"It's a very hard job, but it does have its perks," says Whitney French, historic site director. "Mr. Pitt was incredibly enjoyable, very interesting, very personable, very charismatic, very interested in architecture. Brad knew all about the house and its history and the saving of the house."

Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969) completed the iconic, groundbreaking Farnsworth House in 1951. In 2003, the house's owner put it on the auction block. Fearing a developer would tear it down or build on the 58-acre site, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Landmarks Illinois raised $7.5 million to purchase the house, which is now open to the public.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Taft's Cincinnati Cottage for Sale

Posted on: July 30th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

The Quarry, built in 1886 (Cincinnati Preservation Association)The Cincinnati honeymoon cottage of William Howard Taft (1857-1930) is for sale, prompting fears that it could be torn down for new houses.

Built in 1886 for Taft's bride, Nellie, the six-bedroom Shingle-style house has been on the market for about a month for $700,000. Although Taft's nearby boyhood home is a National Historic Site overseen by the National Park Service, the Quarry is not listed as a local landmark, and the riverview property is zoned for multi-family housing.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Houston Victorian Razed for "Victorian Classic"

Posted on: July 26th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Detail of the overgrown Doyle House, which was bulldozed on July 18, 2007. (Greater Houston Preservation Alliance)Last week, a day before a rally to protest the possible demolition of a 101-year-old Victorian in Houston, a local builder tore down the house to make way for a new Victorian-style mansion.

At a meeting earlier this month, local architect Harry James had told the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance that he would be willing to sell the house for $900,000—more than triple its 2007 appraisal of $290,000.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Last Summer for D.C. Diner?

Posted on: July 25th, 2007 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Special to Preservation magazine by Jimmy Scarano

The Waffle Shop’s lease expires in September, and an office building is planned for the block. (Jimmy Scarano)

With plans for a high-rise office complex in the works, Washington, D.C., is in danger of losing the Waffle Shop, the sole survivor of a local six-restaurant chain that opened in the 1950s.

The classic diner, built in 1950, is one of the few remaining examples of moderne style in the city. The storefront showcases the original neon signage and stainless-steel frames, and inside the decor includes mosaic tiles and vintage horseshoe countertops.

But with its lease expiring in September, the Waffle Shop's days may be numbered.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.

Landmark Status Recommended for Felix the Cat

Posted on: July 24th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

The Los Angeles city council will make the final decision later this year on designating the 1948 sign, which is attached to a 1920 showroom. (Ed Fuentes/ViewFromaLoft)Proving that cats always land on their feet, a 49-year-old neon sign in Los Angeles inched closer to historic designation earlier this month.

The city's Cultural Heritage Commission voted 4-1 on July 12 to recommend the Felix Chevrolet sign for designation as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument. At the meeting, however, representatives of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and a city councilmember opposed the designation, saying it could impede development of the area.

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The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.