Preservation Magazine

New Look for Palm Springs Modern Hotel

Posted on: December 12th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Del Marcos HotelPalm Springs has become a hotspot for fans of mid-century modern architecture, inspiring restorations of the city's rare collection of Rat Pack-era buildings.

This fall, the new owners of the 1947 Del Marcos Hotel completed a renovation of the 16-room inn, designed by desert architect William F. Cody.

The hotel reopened in September after workers updated the lobby, installed new restrooms, and created a saltwater pool complete with piped-in music. "It's back to A-plus condition," says Jack Davis, manager and partner in the company that bought the hotel last year.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Last Frank Lloyd Wright Hotel on Track for 2010 Reopening

Posted on: December 10th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mason City, IowaWork is under way at the last remaining hotel Frank Lloyd Wright designed, the Park Inn Hotel in Mason City, Iowa, which has been closed since 1972.

Wright designed the Park Inn Hotel and adjacent City National Bank in 1910.

In September, Wright on the Park, Inc., the organization that is overseeing the work, bought the City National Bank, coming a step closer to fulfilling its mission to "own, restore, preserve, and maintain" the hotel and bank building.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Oregon Railroad Tries to Get Back on Track

Posted on: December 7th, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Mt. Hood RailroadFor a century, the sturdy little Mount Hood Railroad carried lumber, fruit, and passengers through Oregon's Hood River valley, 60 miles east of Portland. But a year ago, disaster struck. November rainfall, surpassing 15 inches, broke records. Part of Mount Hood's Eliot Glacier broke away, releasing torrents that poured off the mountain and damaged local trails, roads, and bridges—and the railroad. The force of the floodwaters literally changed the course of the Hood River at milepost 15, leaving 150 feet of track hanging in the air.

"The track is in place, but there's no land under it. It looks like a suspension bridge," says the railroad's general manager Michelle Marquart. For the past year, the railroad company has been working with an engineering firm to get planning and permitting in place to restore the tracks. "We have a very solid plan, but it is a very expensive plan," says Marquart.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Ohio Roller Coaster Going Down?

Posted on: December 5th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Big DipperThe past two months have been, well, a roller coaster ride for the 1925 Big Dipper at Ohio’s Geauga Lake amusement park, which has been in operation since 1888.

The last of 13 wood roller coasters designed by John Miller, the ride is for sale, along with two other wood coasters and the entire 500-acre site in Aurora, Ohio. With no buyers, its future looks bleak. In September, its owner, Cedar Fair Entertainment Company, announced its plans to turn the park into a water park and sell its 40 rides in time for opening day in May 2008.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) has asked Cedar Fair to reconsider its plans. “Ideally, keeping the Big Dipper in its Aurora, Ohio, home would be preferable—perhaps by including the coaster as part of a mixed-use retail and amusement complex or as part of a classic amusement park museum,” Brown wrote in a letter to Cedar Fair officials last month. “As Cedar Fair makes final decisions on the future of the Dipper, I strongly urge against destroying or scrapping this unique piece of Buckeye State history.”... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Historic Seattle Restores 1907 House

Posted on: December 5th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Dearborn House, SeattleOn Sunday, a Seattle preservation group celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Dearborn House, which it has restored as its offices.

Historic Seattle bought the Henry H. Dearborn House 10 years ago, thanks to a large donation. The exterior was restored in 2003 with a grant from the Washington State Historical Society Heritage Fund.

Last year Historic Seattle began the interior work, removing false ceilings and replacing original doors and windows in the National Register-listed building, which became a city landmark in May.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lost: Mid-Century Modern House in Texas

Posted on: December 3rd, 2007 by Preservation magazine

 

Carousel HouseTexas lost a mid-century modern house last month.

Once called the "Carousel House," the circular house in Meyerland was designed and built in 1964 by Robert Cohen, who constructed the house out of wood frames and steel.

In 1987, the elderly Cohens moved out, and the house remained empty until June 2004, when Texas lawyer John O'Quinn purchased it for his classic car collection's manager, Zev Isgur. When Isgur went to jail, the house was deserted.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.