Preservation Magazine

Googie Diner Reopens in California

Posted on: November 27th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mel’s Drive-InA Googie-style restaurant reopened yesterday, almost three years after its owners decided to demolish the 1967 structure in Seal Beach, Calif.

After fans of the Parasol rallied to save the building—more than 12,000 supporters signed a petition—Santa Monica-based owner Century National Properties switched gears and spent $1 million to renovate the building, which has an umbrella-shaped roof designed by Mayer & Kanner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Smithsonian Seeks New Use for 1881 Arts and Industries Building

Posted on: November 26th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Kim O’Connell photoThe Smithsonian Institution is working to find a new use for its shuttered Arts and Industries Building, built in 1881 and empty since 2004, when an engineering firm's report deemed it a safety hazard.

Earlier this month, the Smithsonian issued a request for qualifications for public or private companies to redevelop the National Historic Landmark, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

In June 2006, the National Trust for Historic Preservation named the High Victorian building designed by Adolph Cluss one of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

St. Louis Suburb Fights McMansion Trend

Posted on: November 21st, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

kirkwoodh.jpgIt all started with a little old lady's house and a few red signs.

In the suburban St. Louis town of Kirkwood, Mo., 80-year-old Helen Ballard's 1924 Tudor revival was being sold to a developer with plans to tear it down for a larger house.

It was the last straw for neighbors like Tad Skelton, who had watched eight houses fall for new ones in one of the town's two national historic districts. Skelton and others planted red plastic signs in their yards, protesting the teardown trend. Today 550 front yards in the town of 27,000 display the "Protect Historic Kirkwood" signs.

"They misled the woman. That's what really put people off," Skelton says. "Instead of one letter to the local newspaper, these signs were there day after day. You couldn't forget about it." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Spokane's Art Deco Theater Reopens

Posted on: November 20th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

Spokane’s Fox TheatreTuxedos, red carpets, antique cars—the scene at Saturday's grand reopening of the 1931 Fox Theatre in Spokane, Wash., was a scene from old Hollywood.

"It was a great party," says Joanne Moyer, National Trust advisor. "We've had a real renaissance in downtown Spokane."

Katharine Hepburn, Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong once performed at the art deco theater, designed by Robert Reamer.

Seven years ago, the National Register-listed theater, along with its neighborhood, had become shabby, and it was slated to be torn down for a parking lot. "The community rallied to provide the initial funds to buy the building," Moyer says. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lowe's Pays to Move 1885 House

Posted on: November 19th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mott HouseA house on Lowe's new headquarters in Mooresville, N.C., has been moved a mile away, where it will be renovated as an office.

Lowe's began construction on the site in 2003 and began working with Preservation North Carolina to find someone to claim the house, built in 1885 by local businessman Samuel Mott and empty since Lowe's bought the property four years ago.

Local interior designer Kay Kirby read a story about the 2,400-square-foot Mott House in the Charlotte Observer and contacted Preservation North Carolina.

"We worked with several people that were interested, and she was the best fit," says Mike Stout, director of the nonprofit's northwest office. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.