Preservation Magazine

Rare 18th-Century Tavern Saved

Posted on: November 29th, 2007 by Margaret Foster 2 Comments

 

DeJarnette’s Tavern A preservation group has found a new owner for one of the country's few remaining taverns, the DeJarnette Tavern, built c.1780 in Halifax County, Va.

Named after Daniel DeJarnette, son of a Revolutionary War captain, the building was a colorful stagecoach inn and watering hole. "The tavern is said to have attracted a fun-loving clientele, particularly those who enjoyed horseracing, card playing, and cockfighting," according to the National Register nomination, which APVA Preservation Virginia prepared.

The Oct. 15 sale transferred the dilapidated tavern to a Connecticut couple whose name have not been released. Using state historic tax credits, the owner plans to restore the 1,300-square-foot building to its Civil War appearance, APVA Preservation Virginia announced this week.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Illinois Villa Stripped of Landmark Status

Posted on: November 28th, 2007 by Preservation magazine 1 Comment

 

Villa de Chantal, Rock Island, Ill.The city of Rock Island, Ill., rescinded the local landmark designation of the century-old Villa de Chantal on Nov. 12, clearing the way for its demolition.

The Rock Island-Milan School District has proposed a new $9 million building on the National Register-listed villa's 14-acre site.

The Gothic revival Villa de Chantal was built in four portions, two of which were designed by George Stauduhar and completed by 1906: the chapel, dormitories, and classrooms. ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Googie Diner Reopens in California

Posted on: November 27th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Mel’s Drive-InA Googie-style restaurant reopened yesterday, almost three years after its owners decided to demolish the 1967 structure in Seal Beach, Calif.

After fans of the Parasol rallied to save the building—more than 12,000 supporters signed a petition—Santa Monica-based owner Century National Properties switched gears and spent $1 million to renovate the building, which has an umbrella-shaped roof designed by Mayer & Kanner.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Smithsonian Seeks New Use for 1881 Arts and Industries Building

Posted on: November 26th, 2007 by Margaret Foster

 

Kim O’Connell photoThe Smithsonian Institution is working to find a new use for its shuttered Arts and Industries Building, built in 1881 and empty since 2004, when an engineering firm's report deemed it a safety hazard.

Earlier this month, the Smithsonian issued a request for qualifications for public or private companies to redevelop the National Historic Landmark, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

In June 2006, the National Trust for Historic Preservation named the High Victorian building designed by Adolph Cluss one of America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

St. Louis Suburb Fights McMansion Trend

Posted on: November 21st, 2007 by Margaret Foster 1 Comment

 

kirkwoodh.jpgIt all started with a little old lady's house and a few red signs.

In the suburban St. Louis town of Kirkwood, Mo., 80-year-old Helen Ballard's 1924 Tudor revival was being sold to a developer with plans to tear it down for a larger house.

It was the last straw for neighbors like Tad Skelton, who had watched eight houses fall for new ones in one of the town's two national historic districts. Skelton and others planted red plastic signs in their yards, protesting the teardown trend. Today 550 front yards in the town of 27,000 display the "Protect Historic Kirkwood" signs.

"They misled the woman. That's what really put people off," Skelton says. "Instead of one letter to the local newspaper, these signs were there day after day. You couldn't forget about it." ... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.