Preservation Magazine

Sacred Native American Sites: Bear Butte and Wind Cave

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

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Bear Butte State Park, which the Lakota refer to as Mato Paha and the Cheyenne call Noahvose, was established as a state park in 1961.

The Black Hills of South Dakota offer inspiring landscapes with a rugged vitality steeped in history and tradition. In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, writer Reed Karaim documents his journey through the sacred lands that have been home to Native American tribes for generations.

Along the way he visits two of the region’s most enchanting natural wonders -- Bear Butte and Wind Cave -- and speaks with Jace DeCory, member of the Lakota-Cheyenne River Sioux tribe and assistant professor of American Indian Studies at Black Hills State University in Spearfish, South Dakota.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

Ride Through History on These Historic Zoo Trains

Posted on: June 15th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson No Comments

 

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The Fleishhacker Playfield Limited, or "Little Puffer," has been at the San Francisco Zoo since 1925.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we feature the Zooliner and the Centennial, two beloved miniature vintage trains at the Oregon Zoo that were restored and are now fully functional. In today’s post, we encourage you to hop aboard three additional historic trains and take a ride through history at the San Francisco Zoo, Detroit Zoo, and St. Louis Zoo.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Roadside Rest Shelters

Posted on: June 11th, 2015 by Lauren Walser 1 Comment

 

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This rest area stands against the desert backdrop near Abiquiu, New Mexico.

Think back to your last road trip. Where did you stop for a bite to eat? What scenery did you study when you paused to stretch your legs?

Before options like drive-thrus and commercial travel centers made road travel a little more convenient, small roadside rest areas, many of which were built as part of the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1956, were a driver’s only option.

On a drive from Los Angeles to Austin, Texas, in 2007, photographer Ryann Ford took notice of these rest shelters. “As a photographer, it’s hard not to notice them,” she says. “They’re perfect minimalist structures set on a perfect landscape. And they’re each different in their own way.”

For the last six years, Ford has traveled the country documenting rest shelters along highways and in state and national parks.

“I think they tell the story of a different time,” she says. “Now, we’re so rushed with our travel. We just want to get from point A to point B really quickly, whether it’s by plane or jumping on the fastest highway and getting there as fast as possible. If you eat, it’s through a drive-thru. [These rest shelters] tell the story of a different era in travel, when it was about the journey.”

You can explore Ford’s full collection of photographs in her book, The Last Stop: Vanishing Relics of the American Roadside, due out from powerHouse Books next spring. Until then, you can see a sampling of her photos in the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation.

We’ve also shared a few more of her images here. And we’d love to hear from you. Share your memories of roadside rest areas below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Dive Into These Six Historic Swimming Pools

Posted on: June 8th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding 8 Comments

 

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The Roman Pool at Hearst Castle

We’ve had historic swimming pools on the brain lately. The Summer 2015 issue of Preservation magazine features a story on the architect Julia Morgan, who was known in part for designing unusually lovely pools. (Plus, it’s another hot summer here in Washington, D.C., so the thought of a refreshing dip helps make our workday go swimmingly.)

Below, we’ve assembled a photo tour of six standout pools, three of them designed by Morgan. If you have other favorite historic pools, please let us know about them in the comments section.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

 

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Left: Gary Martinez of Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Right: The marquee and facade of the restored Saenger Theatre in New Orleans.

In the upcoming Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we take a peek behind the curtain at the newly renovated Kings Theatre in Flatbush, Brooklyn. Seized during the 1970s in lieu of back taxes, the historic venue idled vacant until the New York City Economic Development Corporation issued a Request for Proposals to restore it in 2008.

A consortium of groups participated in the project, spearheaded by ACE Theatrical Group and Martinez+Johnson Architecture. Below are excerpts from our wide-ranging conversation with Gary Martinez, president and principal at Martinez+Johnson. [The interview has been edited for length and clarity.]... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

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Atalaya Castle is a unique example of Moorish architecture infused with American craftsmanship.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation magazine, Logan Ward takes readers on a road trip down South Carolina' s Grand Strand, where Myrtle Beach is located. Along the way he visits the ruins of Atalaya in Murrells Inlet, an 80-year-old castle part of Huntington State Park with a vibrant history of art and culture.

Today, Atalaya hosts an annual arts festival in September, drawing fine artisans and aficionados from around the country. Here, we take a fresh look at the estate with more photos by Jody Horton from our feature story.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.