Preservation Magazine

All Aboard! Check Out These Train Depots-Turned-Restaurants

Posted on: March 23rd, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson 30 Comments

 

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The Fullerton Union Pacific Station now houses The Old Spaghetti Factory restaurant.

In the Spring 2015 issue of Preservation, we feature three train depots-turned-restaurants.  Now, we’ve rounded up three more transformed train depots that are sure to supply the tasty ticket for your taste buds.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

In the state of “Smiling Faces and Beautiful Places,” between Myrtle Beach and North Myrtle Beach, lies a pearl.

Atlantic Beach, nicknamed “The Black Pearl” for its rich history and African-American owned businesses, is located in Horry County (pronounced OH-ree) in the northeast corner of South Carolina. Though it was conceived as a result of segregationist laws, Atlantic Beach flourished as a thriving African-American vacation spot and as a nucleus for the surrounding communities of  Crescent Beach, Windy Hill, Ocean Drive, and Cherry Grove that would later become part of North Myrtle Beach. Today, those living in the Black Pearl strive to preserve and communicate the distinctive history of this African-American enclave and the Gullah-Geechee culture that has shaped it.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

Life in a Converted Firehouse

Posted on: March 10th, 2015 by Meghan Drueding

 

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Inside David Braly and Mark Montoya's converted firehouse home

Everyone likes the idea of living in a converted something-or-other. An old barn, an industrial loft, a former schoolhouse: With a lot of TLC, all of these building types have the potential to become comfortable, appealing residences.

In Montgomery, Alabama, David Braly and Mark Montoya were up to this task. They lavished attention on a neglected firehouse, turning it into a lovely (and quirky) home that honors both past and present. Photographers Steve Gross and Susan Daley have documented the Braly-Montoya residence in the images that appear in the upcoming Spring issue of Preservation magazine, as well as in the video shown here. Enjoy!

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Behind the Scenes: Cannon House Office Building Renewal

Posted on: January 26th, 2015 by Geoff Montes 1 Comment

 

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The Cannon House Office Building in Washington, D.C. is undergoing a ten-year restoration.

Preservation was recently invited by the Architect of the Capitol (AOC) to the Cannon Renewal Project press briefing to see the current condition of the oldest Congressional office and hear more about the ten-year plan underway to restore and preserve it.  On hand to discuss the renewal project were Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers; Superintendent of House Office Buildings William Weidemeyer; and Historian of the U.S. House of Representatives Matthew A. Wasniewski.

Built in 1908, the Beaux-Arts style Cannon House Office Building (known on Capitol Hill by its acronym, "CHOB" or simply “Cannon”) was designed by prominent New York-based architecture firm Carrère and Hastings. Located just one block south of the U.S. Capitol, Cannon is home to the offices of 142 U.S. Representatives across five floors, and includes four committee hearing rooms, the historic Caucus Room, and the Rotunda.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes

Geoff Montes is the Editorial Assistant for Preservation magazine. He enjoys Art Deco architecture, any activity that can be done at the beach, and cotton candy.

 

Lt. Col. (Ret.) Porter Johnson purchased and began restoring the 1850 plantation house in his hometown of Tallulah, Louisiana after returning from Iraq in the summer of 2011.
Lt. Col. (Ret.) Porter Johnson purchased and began restoring the 1850 plantation house in his hometown of Tallulah, Louisiana, after returning from Iraq in the summer of 2011.

In the winter issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight the story of Lt. Col. (Ret.) Porter Johnson, who was bitten by the preservation bug while serving in Baghdad from 2010-2011. After returning home, Johnson set to work restoring an 1850 plantation house in his hometown of Tallulah, Louisiana.

Johnson was one of the best and most enthusiastic interviews I had all year, and I wish I could have made more of his story fit on the page. Luckily for me -- and for you -- I get the chance to publish more of his unique story below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

St. John and St. Thomas: A Supplemental Virgin Islands Travel Guide

Posted on: January 12th, 2015 by David Weible

 

View of St. Thomas from Blackbeard's Castle
View of St. Thomas from Blackbeard's Castle

When I woke up in my apartment in Northwest D.C. this morning, I could practically see my breath. And as I sit here writing this, my back is turned to the outlines of downtown Washington adrift in a blotted mist of freezing rain. I’m sure many of you can relate.

But somewhere there were American citizens that woke up to a perfect 74-degree, sunlit day. They were surrounded by palm trees, warm waters, and plenty of rum. That place is St. Croix, in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The island’s human history -- spanning thousands of years and seven different colonial claims -- was explored by writer Scott Elder in the Winter 2015 issue of Preservation. And though there are enough attractions on St. Croix to last longer than your average vacation, the U.S. Virgin Islands also include St. John and St. Thomas.

Below is a guide to a few of their most interesting historical spots, if you’re ever inclined to leave a dark, cold place behind.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.