Preservation Magazine

[Interview] Q & A with Musician and Design Blogger Moby

Posted on: September 5th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding 4 Comments

 

The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles. Credit Moby
The dramatic exterior of Moby’s restored 1920s French Norman-style house in Los Angeles

In our conversation with Moby for the upcoming Fall 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, he had so many interesting things to say that we didn’t have room for the whole interview in print. Read on for an extended version of our talk with the multitalented electronic musician and DJ, whose writings and photographs of local buildings are showcased on his blog Moby Los Angeles Architecture. An avid architecture and preservation buff, Moby has also shared with us some photos of his restored 1920s house in Los Angeles, which you can see below.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

Pharmacies-Turned-Restaurants: The Cure for What Ails You

Posted on: June 30th, 2014 by Katherine Flynn

 

Credit: W.A. Frost & Co.
W.A. Frost & Company prides itself on serving seasonal, organic, locally sourced cuisine. 

If only you could get a doctor to write you a prescription for a meal in a refurbished pharmacy-turned-restaurant -- you'd feel better in no time. In the Summer 2014 issue of Preservation magazine, we highlight three such eateries: the Gryphon Tea Room in Savannah, Ga., housed in the city’s 1926 Scottish Rite Building; the Hillside Farmacy in Austin, Texas, named for the 1920s drugstore that occupied the same space; and Tonic at Quigley’s in Washington, D.C., located in the circa-1891 Quigley’s Pharmacy.

There are several more around the country, however, that could also do the trick -- consult our handy guide below.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

 

Credit: Lindsey Derrington
The Lewis and Clark Branch of St. Louis County Library is expected to be demolished as early as August.

It’s no secret that Midcentury Modern designs can be a little harder to love than their counterparts from earlier eras, but as these buildings from the post-war period come of age, communities across the country are grappling with the question of whether or not they deserve the same attention and protection as their pre-war ancestors. That seems to be just the case for the Lewis & Clark Branch Library in St. Louis County, Mo.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery in Portland, Oregon: A Refuge for All

Posted on: June 19th, 2014 by Meghan Drueding

 

Credit: Metro and Friends of Lone Fir Cemetery
The MacLeay family mausoleum, in the southern section of Lone Fir.

Portland, Ore., might have been known as Boston, Ore., if not for the outcome of a simple coin toss in 1845. Founding father Asa Lovejoy had been pulling for Boston as the city’s name, but co-founder Francis Pettygrove, who was partial to the Portland moniker, outflipped him.

The penny they used is enshrined at the Oregon Historical Society, and Lovejoy himself rests in peace at Lone Fir Pioneer Cemetery, in the city’s Buckman neighborhood. (Pettygrove, fittingly enough, is buried in another cemetery on the opposite side of the Willamette River.)

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding

Meghan Drueding is the managing editor of Preservation magazine. She has a weakness for mid-century modern, walkable cities, and coffee table books about architecture and design.

First HOPE Crew Project Revitalizes 75-Year-Old Stable

Posted on: June 17th, 2014 by Lauren Walser 3 Comments

 

Credit: Susana Raab
Members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia helped rehabilitate the Skyland Stable, built in 1939, at Shenandoah National Park earlier this year as part of the National Trust's HOPE Crew initiative.

When a crew of young members of the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia arrived at Shenandoah National Park’s Skyland Stable back in March, they knew plenty about construction, but not much about historic preservation.

Less than three months later, however, the once-dilapidated stable looked much as it did when it was built in 1939, thanks to the young corpsmembers who trained alongside preservation professionals to conduct a large-scale rehabilitation of the property.
... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.