Preservation Magazine

 

Written by Jeff Lunden

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The facade of ICA-Art Conservation’s office in the Vitrolite Building.

The Fall 2015 issue of Preservation magazine features a story on the conservation and restoration of the King Sculpture Court ceiling and clerestory at Oberlin College’s Allen Memorial Art Museum. The museum chose Cleveland-based ICA-Art Conservation to lead this project, which seemed only fitting.

In 1952, six Midwestern museums, including the Allen, founded ICA as a nonprofit, and during the 1980s and ‘90s it was housed in the museum’s Postmodern wing. ICA moved to the historic Vitrolite building in Cleveland’s Detroit Shoreway neighborhood in 2003, where it conserves and restores paintings, paper, textiles, and objects, primarily for Midwestern clients.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Guest Writer

Although we're always on the lookout for blog content, we encourage readers to submit story ideas or let us know if you've seen something that might be interesting and engaging for a national audience. Email us at editorial@savingplaces.org.

 

The original version of this post appeared on August 22, 2012.

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Preservationists in Phoenix and beyond rallied to save the David & Gladys Wright House when it faced demolition in 2012.

In the architecture world, no name carries more weight than Frank Lloyd Wright. But, as a dispute in Phoenix Arizona shows, the name alone does not protect iconic buildings from demolition threats. A 1952 Arcadia home built for Wright’s son, David Wright, was in danger of being torn down a few years ago by then-current owners, the 8081 Meridian Corporation.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Climate Change and Preservation: Where Do They Intersect?

Posted on: August 11th, 2015 by Stephanie Meeks 3 Comments

 

In her President's Note in the Summer Issue of Preservation magazine, National Trust for Historic Preservation President, Stephanie Meeks discusses preservationists' responsibility to protect historic places in the face of climate change. Her thoughts have been republished in full below.

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National Trust for Historic Preservation President, Stephanie Meeks.

Summertime brings picnics, baseball games, family vacations, and, increasingly, record-busting temperatures. Each of the 10 hottest years on record has happened since 1998, including the hottest of all, 2014. As a preservation community, we are starting to grapple with the effects of this changing climate in very concrete ways.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Stephanie Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks

Stephanie K. Meeks is president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Fun Facts about Oregon Zoo’s Miniature Trains

Posted on: August 6th, 2015 by Jamesha Gibson No Comments

 

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The Centennial (left) and the Zooliner (right) at the Oregon Zoo

In the Summer 2015 issue of Preservation, we report on the restoration of the Oregon Zoo’s miniature trains, The Centennial and the Zooliner. These locomotives have been transporting visitors around the Portland-based zoo since they were installed in 1958 (Centennial) and 1959 (Zooliner). In June 2014, the miniature trains were sent to the Pacific Truck Centers in Ridgefield, Washington for restoration work. Here we share some more fun facts about these beloved attractions and their restoration.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

 

Our In Transition series digs back in and brings you up to speed on the current status of historic places previously featured in Preservation magazine or the PreservationNation blog.

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The Orange County Government Center is a Brutalist-style building designed by architect Paul Rudolph.

The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, New York was featured in the Winter 2013 Issue of Preservation magazine as the focus of the article, “Defending Brutalism.” The complex was designed by architect Paul Rudolph and completed in 1971. After 40 years of use, wear and tear on the building showed in its leaky roofs and outdated mechanical systems. In 2011, tropical storms Irene and Lee exacerbated problems and closed the Orange County Government Center for good.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson

Jamesha Gibson is an Editorial Intern at the National Trust. She is passionate about using historic preservation as an avenue for underrepresented communities to share their unique stories. Jamesha also enjoys learning about other cultures through reading, art, language, dancing, and especially cuisine.

[Photos] Une Belle Maison: The Lombard Plantation House

Posted on: June 30th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn 3 Comments

 

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Left: S. Frederick Starr in front of the fully-reconstructed kitchen house on his Lombard Plantation property. He was able to rebuild the kitchen house from scratch using 19th-century notarial drawings. Right: When Starr initially purchased the Lombard Plantation house, a cement-block biker bar called Sarge’s sat in the front yard. 

We’re excited to feature the story of the Lombard Plantation house -- one of the last 19th-century plantation houses still in existence inside New Orleans’ city limits -- in the 2015 Summer issue of Preservation magazine. We couldn’t fit all of the wonderful photos of the house inside our six-page spread, so to make sure they didn’t go to waste, we’re featuring a selection of outtakes by photographer Sara Essex Bradley here.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.