Pop Culture

The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament Round 1 Recap!

Posted on: March 13th, 2015 by David Weible

 

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The Dresden has been a Los Angeles institution since 1954. Credit: Blaise Nutter
The Dresden in Los Angeles takes home the prize in its matchup.

Just like any crowded bar room after midnight, the only guarantee in the first round of a national championship tournament is that there’s going to be some drama.

The first round of The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament saw its fair share, with a number of buzzer beaters, blowouts, and bar-room brawls. Now, straight to the action...... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

The Big Tap: Historic Bars Tournament Tip-Off!

Posted on: March 9th, 2015 by David Weible 20 Comments

 

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From Cinderella stories to buzzer beaters, the NCAA basketball tournament ensures March is a month where history is made. But this year, history and the Big Dance mix to form an even more intoxicating brew: "The Big Tap" Historic Bars Tournament.

Starting in June 2014, the PreservationNation blog poured through dive bars, sports bars, tiki bars, taverns, cocktail lounges, and a slew of other establishments to crack open the stories of some of the nation’s most historic watering holes. But stirring as it was, our virtual bar crawl was merely the regular season. Now it’s time to shake things up with a little post-season drinking game.

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The Historic Bars Tournament has tapped 32 joints from our menu of historic drinkeries to compete against one another in a NCAA Tournament-style, single elimination format. Each week we’ll serve another round of pairings where readers will vote for their favorite inns and alehouses. When the matchups run dry on April 3, only one bar will claim the top shelf.

Below, you’ll find the full tournament bracket with first round matchups. Here's how to vote:

  • To learn more about the contestants, click on any matchup in the bracket for links to our original blog post about each bar.
  • To make your selections during each round, scroll down to the text portion of the blog and click on a bar’s name to highlight it.
  • To submit your vote, enter your email address and zip code, then click “submit.”
  • You can vote for as many or as few bars as you like during each visit, and as many times as you like during each round -- just don’t over-serve yourself.

Voting for each round will last one week and close every Friday morning at 8:00 a.m. ET. Once each round is complete, the bracket will be updated with vote counts and winners. We’ll also publish a new blog post recapping that week’s action, followed by the next round of matchups.

Now that you know the house rules, it’s finally time for tip-off. (Or is that tap-off?) Help yourself to the open bar of matchups below!

Learn More the Historic Bars Matchups

 

UPDATED: Voting has now closed for Round 1. Vote in the current round here.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Weible

David Weible

David Weible is a content specialist for the National Trust, previously with Preservation magazine. He came to D.C. from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

[Historic Bars] New York City’s White Horse Tavern

Posted on: March 6th, 2015 by Katherine Flynn

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Last one up: White Horse Tavern in New York City.

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The White Horse Tavern has hosted dozens of literary luminaries over the years.

After Welsh poet Dylan Thomas downed an alleged eighteen shots of the last whiskey of his life at Greenwich Village’s White Horse Tavern on November 3, 1953, legend has it that he immediately stumbled outside and collapsed on the sidewalk. He was taken back to his room at the Chelsea Hotel, and died at New York’s St. Vincent Hospital a few days later of complications from pneumonia and other ailments.

Thomas’s legacy, however, is still alive and well at the last drinking establishment he patronized.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.

[Historic Bars] San Francisco’s Vesuvio Cafe

Posted on: February 26th, 2015 by Lauren Walser

 

In our next round of historic bars, let's sidestep reality and look at those establishments reflected in some way through the lens of pop culture. Next up: Vesuvio Café in San Francisco.

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Vesuvio Café was founded in 1948.

Writer Henry Miller once wrote to Jack Kerouac, saying that he enjoyed The Dharma Bums and would like to meet the younger author in person. Kerouac agreed, and they arranged to meet one night in 1960 in Big Sur, along California’s central coast.

But the night of the meeting, Kerouac never made it out of San Francisco. Instead, he spent his evening at Vesuvio Café.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

 

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In this day of green screens, CGI, and other special effects techniques, it’s easy for filmmakers to fake reality. But when it comes to historic places, many of this year’s Oscar contenders opted for the real deal.

Below, we look at five Academy Award-nominated films that shot on-location at historic sites across the country.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

10 Iconic Movie Sets Starring … The Antiquities Act!

Posted on: February 19th, 2015 by National Trust for Historic Preservation

 

Written by Denise Ryan, Director of Public Lands Policy

An R2-D2 character visits Death Valley (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars"). Credit: Alyse & Remi, Flickr
An R2-D2 figure visits Death Valley National Park (also known as the planet Tatooine in "Star Wars").

The Antiquities Act may sound like a dusty old piece of legislation, a relic of a bygone era that long ago ceased to have relevance for average Americans. But you will spill your popcorn to learn that the Antiquities Act -- considered America’s first preservation law enacted in 1906 -- continues to play a critical role in protecting places across the country that have been featured in some of Hollywood’s best-known blockbusters.

From “Star Wars” to “Titanic,” from “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” to “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” some of our most beloved movies were filmed in landscapes and historic sites protected by the Antiquities Act. "The Godfather: Part II," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind," and "The Cider House Rules" are all Oscar winners and feature places protected by this little-known law which allow the President to permanently protect federally owned or controlled structures and lands.

On Thursday, February 19, the President will take direct action for the 14th time and establish a new National Monument from a portion of the Pullman Historic District in Chicago. The Pullman neighborhood was featured in the Oscar-winning movies "The Road to Perdition" and "The Fugitive," creating yet another link between great films and iconic American landscapes and historic sites.

Before you settle down this Sunday night to watch the stars walk the red carpet on their way to the 87th Academy Awards, enjoy nine more of our favorite places featured in motion pictures protected and recognized by the Antiquities Act of 1906 -- now including historic Pullman in Chicago!... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

National Trust for Historic Preservation

National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded non-profit organization, works to save America's historic places.