Pop Culture

 

The Spud Drive-In. Photo courtesy jpc.raleigh, Flickr.
The Spud Drive-In

Anyone who owns -- or has tried to buy -- a camera any time in the past 10 years knows that digital photography has replaced film almost entirely. This transformation has not been limited to still pictures; digital is now king at the movies, too, which has created challenges at many older movie theaters.

The Spud Drive-In in Driggs, Idaho, is no exception. The theater, which opened in 1953 (and celebrates its 60th birthday this week) has long been a beloved part of the community, but has faced closure twice in recent years -- first from management changes, and then from the transition to digital projection.

Local fans rallied with Facebook outreach that reached thousands, and to date enough "Save the Spud" t-shirts have been sold to cover half the cost of a new digital projector. (They're still available -- get 'em while they're hot!)... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern

Sarah Heffern is the social media strategist for the National Trust’s Public Affairs team. While she embraces all things online and pixel-centric, she’s also a hard-core building hugger, having fallen for preservation in a fifth grade “Built Environment” class. Follow her on Twitter at @smheffern.

 

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Shankweiler's in Orefield, Pennsylvania is the oldest drive-in theatre in the country.

It was only supposed to be a temporary gig. Paul Geissinger, a recent high school graduate, agreed to run the projection booth at Shankweiler’s Drive-in Theatre in Orefield, Pa., for just a couple weeks until the theater’s new owner could find a permanent employee.

Forty-two years later, Geissinger is still there -- except now, he owns the place.

“I remember, I told [the owner] no, I’m not interested in working at a drive-in,” says Geissinger, who, at the time, was enrolled in electronics school. “But I said, fine, I’ll give you two weekends while you find someone else. But after two weeks, he couldn’t find anyone, so I gave him three weeks. Then another week. And I’m still there.”

This April, Geissinger opened up the beloved Shankweiler’s Drive-in Theatre, the oldest drive-in theater in the country, for its 80th season.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser

Lauren Walser is the Los Angeles-based Field Editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys writing and thinking about history, art, architecture, and public space.

Gone But Not Forgotten: Minnesota's Cottage View Drive-In

Posted on: June 20th, 2013 by David Robert Weible 1 Comment

 

The Cottage View Drive-In’s iconic 1960s sign. Credit: City of Cottage Grove
The Cottage View Drive-In’s iconic 1960s sign

From its first showing of It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World on opening night in 1966 until its farewell feature of Grease in September of 2012, the Cottage View Drive-In served the southeastern suburbs of Minneapolis-St. Paul with good, old-fashioned American summertime fun (short as those summertimes may be). And while not all the movies it showed over its 46-year service had happy endings, each left the loyal patrons of the Cottage View satisfied. The same can be said for the theater itself.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible

David Robert Weible is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. He came to DC from Cleveland, Ohio, where he wrote for Sailing World and Outside magazines.

 

The executive producer and architecture buff behind AMC's 1960s-set megahit Mad Men sat down with Preservation magazine for its upcoming Summer issue and dished on his work with the LA Conservancy, his passion for places, and why he believes Don Draper is a preservationist.

Weiner is so passionate about the topic, in fact, that we couldn't fit the whole interview in print -- which means you get to enjoy it here instead!

Matthew Weiner on set. Credit: Matthew Weiner
Matthew Weiner on set

... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

One Man's Quest to Restore the Humble Homes of American Icons

Posted on: May 30th, 2013 by Katherine Flynn 1 Comment

 

Dan Riedemann, of Nineteenth Century Restorations, LLC, poses with a sign outside Johnny Carson’s birthplace before the restoration. Credit: Dan Riedemann/Nineteenth Century Restorations, LLC
Dan Riedemann, of Nineteenth Century Restorations, LLC, poses with a sign outside Johnny Carson’s birthplace before the restoration.

Woody Guthrie, Nina Simone, and Johnny Carson are just three of the many American legends to be born in small, modest homes in America’s heartland, far away from the bright lights of the bustling cities where they would one day perform. Two of these three homes are still standing, serving as a testament to the fact that great things can come from humble beginnings.

Dan Riedemann, who co-owns Nineteenth Century Restorations, LLC, with his wife, has taken on the task of restoring each of these homes to their original, historically accurate appearances. For the past four months, Riedemann has been restoring Johnny Carson’s childhood home in Corning, Ia., a 1,000-square-foot house where Carson spent the first three years of his life.... Read More →

The National Trust for Historic Preservation works to save America's historic places. Join us today to help protect the places that matter to you.

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn

Katherine Flynn is an assistant editor at Preservation magazine. She enjoys coffee, record stores and uncovering the stories behind historic places. Follow her on Twitter at @kateallthetime.